Home

Commercial Diving Operations Protection PPE

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

Commercial Diving Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) must be worn by workers when a worker may be exposed to one or more of the following types of hazards during a diving operation:

  • drowning;
  • umbilical fouling;
  • respiratory and circulatory health effects;
  • hypothermia (e.g. cold water below 4 deg C [40 deg F]);
  • hyperthermia (e.g. hot water greater than 30.5 deg C [87 deg F]);
  • pressure-related injuries, such as dysbarism (adverse health effect due to a difference between ambient pressure and the total gas pressure in tissues, fluids, or cavities of the body);
  • hazards associated with actual work (e.g. equipment, release of hazardous substances, entrapment, explosions, etc.);
  • environmental (e.g. biological contaminants; marine or freshwater life, limited visibility, noise, hazardous/noxious substances, etc.);
  • water specific conditions (e.g. high currents or tidal conditions); and
  • injuries from equipment (e.g. cranes), etc.

Employers must first attempt to control these hazards by using the hierarchy of controls prior to having workers wear commercial diving PPE. The hierarchy of controls requires employers to first consider alternative control measures, such as scheduling diving activities during warmer months, construction of guards or screens, or draining the water from ponds, instead of relying on PPE alone to protect workers. Remember, PPE is the last line of safety! See “PPE Basics” for further information on the hierarchy of controls.

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations require workers to use, properly care for, and inspect the PPE provided to them by the employer. The Regulations also require employers to provide PPE at no cost to the individual worker and provide training to the worker on how to use and inspect the PPE properly.

The Commercial Diving Operations PPE Code of Practice provides guidance and information about the regulatory requirements and applicable CSA standards, such as CSA Z275.2 Occupational Safety Code for Diving Operations and CSA Z275.4 Competency Standard for Diving Operations. In addition, the employer must determine appropriate PPE based on a job hazard assessment (JHA), as the Code and CSA standard cannot anticipate every scenario/work task that may require commercial diving PPE. The JHA should:

  • identify potential hazards associated with each step of the diving operation. If the job is too complex, break it into several tasks and prepare a JHA for each task;
  • consider potential accident causes;
  • consider both environmental and health hazards; and
  • consider situations where there may be multiple hazards for a given task that could cause injuries, such as environmental conditions, excessive physical loads, and working hours/rest periods, etc.

Employers must:

  • inform the workers about the job hazard assessment and required PPE;
  • inform the workers about the diving plan and ensure they understand the plan;
  • evaluate the effectiveness of the control measures prior to the diver entering the water;
  • educate and train workers on the proper use and care of commercial diving PPE. Include the following information:
    • why commercial diving PPE is necessary;
    • when workers must wear commercial diving PPE;
    • how to wear a commercial diving PPE;
    • how to inspect the PPE  for signs of wear;
    • how to clean and care for, and use the commercial diving PPE;
    • what is considered misuse of commercial diving PPE (e.g. modifications); and
    • when commercial diving PPE must be returned and/or replaced.
  • ensure only competent workers are permitted to complete diving tasks;
  • ensure workers follow the decompression tables and procedures published or approved by the Defense Research and Development Canada Toronto
  • ensure workers undergo comprehensive medical evaluation at least annually,  prior to diving  in accordance with the CSA Z275.2-11 standard 
  • require the worker to provide a copy of their medical certificate and retain a copy throughout the worker’s employment;
  • have diving operations completed under the direction of a supervisor and provide adequate resources for the supervisor to protect the health and safety of the divers;
  • ensure there is a sufficient number of workers present to complete the diving operation safely;
  • ensure a standby diver is trained, equipped, and ready to give assistance to a submerged diver in an emergency;
  • designate a worker as the diver’s tender, who is dedicated only to the task of monitoring the diver;
  • ensure the breathing air used by the diver is clean, wholesome, and of adequate quantity for the diving operation. In addition, there  must be a reserve supply of 2.5 times what is required for the diving operation;
  • ensure that any air or mixed gas used as a breathing gas meets CSA Z180  “Compressed Breathing Air Systems” for composition and purity requirements;
  • ensure an appropriate decompression procedure and schedule is followed if the breathing gas is a mixed gas;
  • ensure all diving equipment is free from defects, adequately maintained, protected ,and examined and tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications;
  • prohibit diving operations unless there is a properly established, equipped, and maintained diving base;
  • provide a hyperbaric chamber that meets CSA Z275.1 “Chamber Standards” for dives planned to exceed the decompression limit or if the depth of the dive exceeds 50 m;
  • ensure each occupational diving operation is supervised by a knowledgeable and competent diving supervisor. The supervisor must be competent in the techniques being used, must remain on-site, and must be in direct control of the diving operation.
  • ensure a diving plan is submitted in writing by the supervisor prior to the start of a diving operation. The diving plan  must include instructions, equipment, quantity of breathing gas, and contingency plans to ensure the health and safety of the diver;
  • only permit free swimming diving if the dive cannot be safely completed in the tethered mode;
  • during a scuba diving operation, ensure the diver uses open-circuit equipment, a bail-out system, a  lifeline, and an exposure suit or appropriate protective clothing for the conditions of  work and water temperature;
  • ensure divers using scuba equipment do not dive to a depth exceeding 50 m or dive without a lifeline under ice or in hazardous conditions;
  • ensure the diver uses mixed gas for dives beyond 50 metres; and
  • ensure that surface-supply dives are properly equipped with lifelines, air lines, a bail-out system, and effective two-way communication.

Workers (divers) must:

  • use the required commercial diving PPE according to the instructions and training that they receive;
  • inspect the commercial diving PPE immediately before each dive;
  • check all equipment for leaks and proper function through submersion at the start of each dive;
  • return and notify the employer of any defects found in the commercial diving PPE;
  • follow the diving plan and the diving supervisor’s instructions;
  • maintain a personal diver’s log and retain it for a five-year period after the log is completed; and
  • ensure they know all of the requirements in Section 305 when they use the buddy system during a dive.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General duties of employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Part 20 DIVING OPERATIONS

Section 291 Competent workers

291. An employer shall ensure that only competent workers are required or permitted to perform diving operations.

Section 292 Standards

292. An employer shall ensure that divingoperations, repetitive dives and treatments of divers are carried out in strict accordance with decompression tables and procedures published or approved by the Defence Research and Development Canada Toronto (formerly known as Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine) or another approved agency.

Section 293 Medical examination

293. (1) An employer who employs a diver shall ensure that the diver has a comprehensive medical examination that is

(a) conducted by a medical professional not less than least once every 12 months; and

(b) in accordance with the criteria set out in Appendices A and B of Canadian Standards Association standard CAN/CSA-Z275.2-11 Occupational Safety Code for Diving Operations , as amended from time to time.

(2) A diver shall not dive unless he or she has been certified by a medical professional in accordance with subsection (1) to be free of any medical condition that could make unsafe the performance of the type of dive to be carried out.

(3) A diver shall

(a) provide the employer with a copy of the certification referred to in subsection (2); and

(b) place the original certificate in the diver’s personal log kept in accordance with section 304.

(4) An employer shall

(a) ensure that a diver is not required or permitted to dive unless the diver furnishes the employer with a copy of a certificate obtained under subsection (2) within the preceding 12 months;

(b) retain the copy of the certificate referred to in paragraph (a) while the diver works for the employer.

Section 294 Diving supervisor

294. An employer shall

(a) ensure that diving operations are conducted under the direction of diving supervisors; and

(b) provide to diving supervisors information and resources necessary to protect the health and safety of each diver under the direction of the diving supervisors.

Section 295 Minimum crew

295. An employer shall ensure that workers are present in sufficient numbers for a diving operation to ensure that the operation can be undertaken safely.

Section 296 Standby diver

296. (1) In this section,

"dressed-in" means fully equipped to dive and ready to enter the water, with all life support and communications equipment tested and at hand, but not necessarily with the helmet, face plate or face mask in place;

"standby diver" means a diver who is

(a) available at a dive site to give assistance to a submerged diver in an emergency,

(b) dressed-in, and

(c) trained and equipped to operate at the depths and in the circumstances in which the submerged diver is operating.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a standby diver is present when diving operations are in progress.

(3) An employer shall not require or permit a standby diver to dive other than in an emergency.

Section 297 Diver’s tender

297. (1) An employer shall designate a worker as a diver’s tender to monitor the dive of a diver.

(2) A diver’s tender must be competent in the operation of diving apparatus used for a dive, the diving operation in progress and the emergency diving procedures and signals to be used between diver and diver’s tender.

(3) An employer shall ensure that

(a) a diver’s tender acceptable to the diver is provided for each diver in the water during a diving operation; and

(b) the diver’s tender devotes his or her whole time and attention to the work as a diver’s tender.

Section 298 Breathing gas

298. (1) In this section, "mixed gas" means a respirable breathing mixture, other than air, that provides adequate oxygen to support life and does not cause excessive breathing resistance, impairment of neurological functions or other detrimental physiological effects.

(2) If air is used as the breathing gas by a diver, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the air is clean and wholesome and supplied in adequate quantity; and

(b) a reserve supply of 2.5 times the air required for the operation is supplied.

(3) An employer shall ensure that any air or mixed gas used as a breathing gas by a diver meets the approved standard for composition and purity requirements.

(4) If a mixed gas is used as a breathing gas by a diver, an employer shall ensure that the decompression procedures, schedules and tables used are appropriate for the mixed gas.

Section 299 Diving equipment

299. An employer shall ensure that diving equipment, including breathing apparatus, compressors, compressed gas cylinders, gas control valves, pressure gauges, reserve supply devices, pipings, helmets, winches, cables, diving bells or stages and other accessories necessary for the safe conduct of the diving operation, is

(a) of approved designs, sound construction, adequate strength and free from obvious defects;

(b) maintained in a condition that will ensure the equipment’s continuing operating integrity and suitability for use;

(c) adequately protected against malfunction at low temperatures that could be caused by ambient air or water or by the expansion of gas; and

(d) examined, tested, overhauled and repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Section 300 Diving base

300. (1) An employer shall not allow a diving operation to proceed unless a diving base is set up before and maintained during the diving operation.

(2) While a diving operation is in progress, an employer shall ensure that the diving base is equipped with the following:

(a) if scuba is being used, one complete spare set of underwater breathing apparatus with fully charged cylinders to be used for emergency purposes only;

(b) an adequate quantity of oxygen for therapeutic purposes;

(c) one shot-line of weighted 19 mm manila of sufficient length to reach the bottom at the maximum depth of water at the dive site;

(d) a first aid kit that is appropriate for the number of workers and the work site;

(e) one complete set of decompression tables;

(f) a suitable heated facility for the use of divers that is located on or as near as possible to the dive site;

(g) any other equipment that could be necessary to protect the health and safety of workers.

Section 301 Hyperbaric chamber

301. (1) In this section,

"Class A hyperbaric chamber" means a hyperbaric chamber that meets the requirements for a Class A hyperbaric chamber as set out in Canadian Standards Association standard Z275.1-05, Hyperbaric Facilities , as amended from time to time;

"decompression limit" means the point in the descent of a diver, based on the depth and duration of the dive and determined in accordance with a decompression table, beyond which the diver will require one or more decompression stops during ascent if the diver descends further.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a Class A hyperbaric chamber in operable condition is on site if

(a) a dive is planned that could exceed the decompression limit; or

(b) the depth of a dive exceeds 50 m.

Section 302 Diving plan

302. (1) In this section, "surface crew" includes the minimum crew required under section 295, the diving supervisor, standby diver and diver’s tender.

(2) A diving supervisor shall submit a general diving plan in writing to the employer before beginning a diving operation.

(3) A diving supervisor shall

(a) plan the dive to ensure the health and safety of the diver;

(b) instruct the surface crew on the procedures necessary to ensure the health and safety of the diver;

(c) ensure that all necessary equipment is available and is in good operating condition;

(d) ensure that the quantity of breathing gas supplied to a diver is sufficient for the dive that is planned;

(e) develop and implement a contingency plan for any reasonably foreseeable emergency situation that could endanger the diver;

(f) keep a log showing each diver’s activities on each day and make entries respecting each dive on the day on which the dive is performed;

(g) remain in the immediate area of the dive site while a diving operation is in progress;

(h) ensure that each diver enters in the diver’s personal log the information required by paragraph 304(3)(a) for each dive performed by the diver; and

(i) verify the accuracy of the information recorded in each diver’s personal log required by paragraph 304(3)(a) and sign the entry to acknowledge the supervisor’s verification.

(4) Nothing in this section limits the responsibilities of an employer under this Part.

Section 303 General responsibilities of diver

303. A diver shall

(a) proceed in accordance with the general diving plan and the instructions of the diving supervisor;

(b) inspect his or her equipment immediately before each dive; and

(c) begin each dive by submerging and checking all equipment to ensure that there are no leaks and that the equipment is functioning properly.

Section 304 Diver’s personal log

304. (1) In this section,

"bottom time" means the total elapsed time, measured in minutes, from the time a descending diver leaves the surface of the water to the time the diver begins final ascent;

"therapeutic recompression" means treatment of a diver for decompression sickness, usually in a hyperbaric chamber.

(2) A diver shall keep a personal log and retain the log for a five-year period after the log’s completion.

(3) A diver shall record in the personal log, in chronological order

(a) an entry for each dive that he or she has made, verified and signed by the diving supervisor and including

(i) the type of breathing apparatus used,

(ii) the breathing gas used,

(iii) the time at which the diver left the surface,

(iv) the bottom time,

(v) the maximum depth reached,

(vi) the time the diver left the bottom,

(vii) the time the diver reached the surface,

(viii) the surface interval, if more than one dive is undertaken in a day,

(ix) the decompression table and schedule used,

(x) the date of the dive,

(xi) any observations relevant to the health or safety of the diver arising from the dive, and

(xii) the name of the employer; and

(b) an entry signed by an attending physician or diving supervisor, respecting any therapeutic recompression or other exposure to a hyperbaric environment.

Section 305 Buddy system

305. (1) The buddy system of diving involves the use of two divers, each of whom is responsible for the other diver’s safety.

(2) A diver who is diving using the buddy system shall

(a) maintain constant visual contact with the other buddy diver during the dive;

(b) know the hand signals being used and acknowledge each signal as given;

(c) not leave the other buddy diver unless it is an emergency requiring the assistance of one of the buddy divers; and

(d) abort the dive immediately if the buddy divers become separated from each other or the other buddy diver aborts the dive.

Section 306 Free swimming diving

306. (1) In this section, "free swimming diving" means diving while using self-contained underwater breathing apparatus with the diver supervised but not tethered to the surface by a lifeline or float.

(2) An employer shall ensure that free swimming diving is performed only if a dive cannot safely be accomplished in the tethered mode.

(3) An employer shall not require or permit a diver to perform free swimming diving unless

(a) the diver is accompanied by a tethered in-water standby diver or the buddy system is used; and

(b) the employer has first ensured that conditions are such that the free swimming dive can be undertaken safely.

Section 307 Scuba diving

307. (1) An employer shall ensure that, during scuba diving operations, a diver uses

(a) open-circuit scuba equipped with a demand regulator and a tank with quick-release harness;

(b) a reserve device or bail-out system;

(c) a lifeline unless the buddy system is used; and

(d) an exposure suit or protective clothing that is appropriate for the condition of work and the temperature of the water.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a diver using scuba equipment does not

(a) dive to a depth exceeding 50 m; or

(b) dive without a lifeline

(i) under ice, or

(ii) if hazardous conditions exist, including water currents, low visibility and adverse weather conditions.

Section 308 Surface-supply diving

308. (1) In this section,

"surface-supply diving" means a mode of diving where the diver is supplied from the dive site with breathing gas from an umbilical;

"umbilical" means a life support hose bundle comprising a composite hose and cable, or separate hoses and cables, that

(a) extends from the surface to a diver or to a submersible chamber occupied by a diver, and

(b) supplies breathing gas, power, heat and communication to the diver.

(2) If a diver is required or permitted to perform surface-supply diving, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the umbilical incorporates a lifeline to prevent stress on the hose;

(b) the connections between the air line and the equipment supplying the breathing gas to the diver are secured and properly guarded to prevent accidental disconnection or damage;

(c) the air line is equipped with the following, in sequence from the surface connection:

(i) a regulating valve that is clearly marked as to which diver’s air supply the valve controls,

(ii) a pressure gauge that is accessible and clearly visible to the diver’s tender,

(iii) a non-return valve at the point of attachment of the air line to the diving helmet or mask;

(d) the diver carries a bail-out system; and

(e) the diver is equipped with a lifeline and an effective means of two-way communication between the diver and the diver’s tender referred to in section 297.

[R-085-2015, s. 7]

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General Duties of Employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Part 20 DIVING OPERATIONS

Section 291 Competent workers

291. An employer shall ensure that only competent workers are required or permitted to perform diving operations.

Section 292 Standard

292. An employer shall ensure that diving operations, repetitive dives and treatments of divers are carried out in strict accordance with decompression tables and procedures published or approved by the Defence Research and Development Canada Toronto (formerly known as Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine) or another approved agency.

Section 293 Medical examination

293. (1) An employer who employs a diver shall ensure that the diver has a comprehensive medical examination that is

(a) conducted by a medical professional not less than least once every 12 months; and

(b) in accordance with the criteria set out in Appendices A and B of Canadian Standards Association standard CAN/CSA-Z275.2-11 Occupational Safety Code for Diving Operations, as amended from time to time.

(2) A diver shall not dive unless he or she has been certified by a medical professional in accordance with subsection (1) to be free of any medical condition that could make unsafe the performance of the type of dive to be carried out.

(3) A diver shall

(a) provide the employer with a copy of the certification referred to in subsection (2); and

(b) place the original certificate in the diver’s personal log kept in accordance with section 304.

(4) An employer shall

(a) ensure that a diver is not required or permitted to dive unless the diver furnishes the employer with a copy of a certificate obtained under subsection (2) within the preceding 12 months;

(b) retain the copy of the certificate referred to in paragraph (a) while the diver works for the employer.

Section 294 Diving supervisor

294. An employer shall

(a) ensure that diving operations are conducted under the direction of diving supervisors; and

(b) provide to diving supervisors information and resources necessary to protect the health and safety of each diver under the direction of the diving supervisors.

Section 295 Minimum crew

295. An employer shall ensure that workers are present in sufficient numbers for a diving operation to ensure that the operation can be undertaken safely.

Section 296 Standby diver

296. (1) In this section,

"dressed-in" means fully equipped to dive and ready to enter the water, with all life support and communications equipment tested and at hand, but not necessarily with the helmet, face plate or face mask in place;

"standby diver" means a diver who is

(a) available at a dive site to give assistance to a submerged diver in an emergency,

(b) dressed-in, and

(c) trained and equipped to operate at the depths and in the circumstances in which the submerged diver is operating.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a standby diver is present when diving operations are in progress.

(3) An employer shall not require or permit a standby diver to dive other than in an emergency.

Section 297 Diver’s tender

297. (1) An employer shall designate a worker as a diver’s tender to monitor the dive of a diver.

(2) A diver’s tender must be competent in the operation of diving apparatus used for a dive, the diving operation in progress and the emergency diving procedures and signals to be used between diver and diver’s tender.

(3) An employer shall ensure that

(a) a diver’s tender acceptable to the diver is provided for each diver in the water during a diving operation; and

(b) the diver’s tender devotes his or her whole time and attention to the work as a diver’s tender.

Section 298 Breathing Gas

298. (1) In this section, "mixed gas" means a respirable breathing mixture, other than air, that provides adequate oxygen to support life and does not cause excessive breathing resistance, impairment of neurological functions or other detrimental physiological effects.

(2) If air is used as the breathing gas by a diver, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the air is clean and wholesome and supplied in adequate quantity; and

(b) a reserve supply of 2.5 times the air required for the operation is supplied.

(3) An employer shall ensure that any air or mixed gas used as a breathing gas by a diver meets the approved standard for composition and purity requirements.

(4) If a mixed gas is used as a breathing gas by a diver, an employer shall ensure that the decompression procedures, schedules and tables used are appropriate for the mixed gas.

Section 299 Diving equipment

299. An employer shall ensure that diving equipment, including breathing apparatus, compressors, compressed gas cylinders, gas control valves, pressure gauges, reserve supply devices, pipings, helmets, winches, cables, diving bells or stages and other accessories necessary for the safe conduct of the diving operation, is

(a) of approved designs, sound construction, adequate strength and free from obvious defects;

(b) maintained in a condition that will ensure the equipment’s continuing operating integrity and suitability for use;

(c) adequately protected against malfunction at low temperatures that could be caused by ambient air or water or by the expansion of gas; and

(d) examined, tested, overhauled and repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Section 300 Diving base

300. (1) An employer shall not allow a diving operation to proceed unless a diving base is set up before and maintained during the diving operation.

(2) While a diving operation is in progress, an employer shall ensure that the diving base is equipped with the following:

(a) if scuba is being used, one complete spare set of underwater breathing apparatus with fully charged cylinders to be used for emergency purposes only;

(b) an adequate quantity of oxygen for therapeutic purposes;

(c) one shot-line of weighted 19 mm manila of sufficient length to reach the bottom at the maximum depth of water at the dive site;

(d) a first aid kit that is appropriate for the number of workers and the work site;

(e) one complete set of decompression tables;

(f) a suitable heated facility for the use of divers that is located on or as near as possible to the dive site;

(g) any other equipment that could be necessary to protect the health and safety of workers.

Section 301 Hyperbaric chamber

301. (1) In this section,

"Class A hyperbaric chamber" means a hyperbaric chamber that meets the requirements for a Class A hyperbaric chamber as set out in Canadian Standards Association standard Z275.1-05, Hyperbaric Facilities, as amended from time to time;

"decompression limit" means the point in the descent of a diver, based on the depth and duration of the dive and determined in accordance with a decompression table, beyond which the diver will require one or more decompression stops during ascent if the diver descends further.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a Class A hyperbaric chamber in operable condition is on site if

(a) a dive is planned that could exceed the decompression limit; or

(b) the depth of a dive exceeds 50 m.

Section 302 Diving Plan

302. (1) In this section, "surface crew" includes the minimum crew required under section 295, the diving supervisor, standby diver and diver’s tender.

(2) A diving supervisor shall submit a general diving plan in writing to the employer before beginning a diving operation.

(3) A diving supervisor shall

(a) plan the dive to ensure the health and safety of the diver;

(b) instruct the surface crew on the procedures necessary to ensure the health and safety of the diver;

(c) ensure that all necessary equipment is available and is in good operating condition;

(d) ensure that the quantity of breathing gas supplied to a diver is sufficient for the dive that is planned;

(e) develop and implement a contingency plan for any reasonably foreseeable emergency situation that could endanger the diver;

(f) keep a log showing each diver’s activities on each day and make entries respecting each dive on the day on which the dive is performed;

(g) remain in the immediate area of the dive site while a diving operation is in progress;

(h) ensure that each diver enters in the diver’s personal log the information required by paragraph 304(3)(a) for each dive performed by the diver; and

(i) verify the accuracy of the information recorded in each diver’s personal log required by paragraph 304(3)(a) and sign the entry to acknowledge the supervisor’s verification.

(4) Nothing in this section limits the responsibilities of an employer under this Part.

Section 303 General responsibilities of diver

303. A diver shall

(a) proceed in accordance with the general diving plan and the instructions of the diving supervisor;

(b) inspect his or her equipment immediately before each dive; and

(c) begin each dive by submerging and checking all equipment to ensure that there are no leaks and that the equipment is functioning properly.

Section 304 Diver’s personal log

304. (1) In this section,

"bottom time" means the total elapsed time, measured in minutes, from the time a descending diver leaves the surface of the water to the time the diver begins final ascent;

"therapeutic recompression" means treatment of a diver for decompression sickness, usually in a hyperbaric chamber.

(2) A diver shall keep a personal log and retain the log for a five-year period after the log’s completion.

(3) A diver shall record in the personal log, in chronological order

(a) an entry for each dive that he or she has made, verified and signed by the diving supervisor and including

(i) the type of breathing apparatus used,

(ii) the breathing gas used,

(iii) the time at which the diver left the surface,

(iv) the bottom time,

(v) the maximum depth reached,

(vi) the time the diver left the bottom,

(vii) the time the diver reached the surface,

(viii) the surface interval, if more than one dive is undertaken in a day,

(ix) the decompression table and schedule used,

(x) the date of the dive,

(xi) any observations relevant to the health or safety of the diver arising from the dive, and

(xii) the name of the employer; and

(b) an entry signed by an attending physician or diving supervisor, respecting any therapeutic recompression or other exposure to a hyperbaric environment.

Section 305 Buddy system

305. (1) The buddy system of diving involves the use of two divers, each of whom is responsible for the other diver’s safety.

(2) A diver who is diving using the buddy system shall

(a) maintain constant visual contact with the other buddy diver during the dive;

(b) know the hand signals being used and acknowledge each signal as given;

(c) not leave the other buddy diver unless it is an emergency requiring the assistance of one of the buddy divers; and

(d) abort the dive immediately if the buddy divers become separated from each other or the other buddy diver aborts the dive.

Section 306 Free swimming diving

306. (1) In this section, "free swimming diving" means diving while using self-contained underwater breathing apparatus with the diver supervised but not tethered to the surface by a lifeline or float.

(2) An employer shall ensure that free swimming diving is performed only if a dive cannot safely be accomplished in the tethered mode.

(3) An employer shall not require or permit a diver to perform free swimming diving unless

(a) the diver is accompanied by a tethered in-water standby diver or the buddy system is used; and

(b) the employer has first ensured that conditions are such that the free swimming dive can be undertaken safely.

Section 307 Scuba diving

307. (1) An employer shall ensure that, during scuba diving operations, a diver uses

(a) open-circuit scuba equipped with a demand regulator and a tank with quick-release harness;

(b) a reserve device or bail-out system;

(c) a lifeline unless the buddy system is used; and

(d) an exposure suit or protective clothing that is appropriate for the condition of work and the temperature of the water.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a diver using scuba equipment does not

(a) dive to a depth exceeding 50 m; or

(b) dive without a lifeline

(i) under ice, or

(ii) if hazardous conditions exist, including water currents, low visibility and adverse weather conditions.

Section 308 Surface-supply diving

308. (1) In this section,

"surface-supply diving" means a mode of diving where the diver is supplied from the dive site with breathing gas from an umbilical;

"umbilical" means a life support hose bundle comprising a composite hose and cable, or separate hoses and cables, that

(a) extends from the surface to a diver or to a submersible chamber occupied by a diver, and

(b) supplies breathing gas, power, heat and communication to the diver.

(2) If a diver is required or permitted to perform surface-supply diving, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the umbilical incorporates a lifeline to prevent stress on the hose;

(b) the connections between the airline and the equipment supplying the breathing gas to the diver are secured and properly guarded to prevent accidental disconnection or damage;

(c) the air line is equipped with the following, in sequence from the surface connection:

(i) a regulating valve that is clearly marked as to which diver’s air supply the valve controls,

(ii) a pressure gauge that is accessible and clearly visible to the diver’s tender,

(iii) a non-return valve at the point of attachment of the air line to the diving helmet or mask;

(d) the diver carries a bail-out system; and

(e) the diver is equipped with a lifeline and an effective means of two-way communication between the diver and the diver’s tender referred to in section 297.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Accueil

EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

L’équipement de protection individuelle (EPI) pour des activités commerciales de plongée doit être porté par des travailleurs exposés à au moins un des types de dangers suivants lorsqu’ils effectuent une plongée :

  • noyade;
  • emmêlement des ombilicaux;
  • effets sur la santé respiratoire et circulatoire;
  • hypothermie (p. ex., eau froide de moins de 4 oC [40 oF]);
  • hyperthermie (p. ex., eau chaude de plus de 30,5 oC [87 oF]);
  • blessures imputables à la pression, comme le dysbarisme (effet néfaste sur la santé découlant d’un écart entre la pression ambiante et la pression de gaz totale dans les tissus, liquides ou cavités du corps);
  • dangers liés directement au travail exercé (p. ex., équipement, rejet de substances dangereuses, emprisonnement et explosions);
  • dangers environnementaux (p. ex., contaminants biologiques; vie en eau douce et vie marine, visibilité réduite, bruit et substances nocives ou potentiellement dangereuses);
  • conditions propres aux eaux (p. ex., courants forts et fortes marées);
  • blessures causées par l’équipement (p. ex., grues).

Un employeur doit d’abord tenter de maîtriser ces dangers en recourant à la hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle avant d’exiger le port d’EPI par les travailleurs pour des activités commerciales de plongée. La hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle oblige un employeur à considérer d’abord d’autres mesures de contrôle, telles que l’inscription des activités de plongée pendant les mois plus chauds, la construction de grilles ou d’écrans ou encore le drainage de l’eau de bassins, au lieu de compter uniquement sur l’EPI pour protéger les travailleurpar. Rappelez-vous, l’EPI est une mesure de dernier recours en matière de sécurité! Se reporter à «  Rudiments de l’EPI » pour de plus amples renseignements sur la hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle.

Le Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail oblige les travailleurs à utiliser, à bien entretenir et à inspecter l’EPI fourni par l’employeur. Il oblige également un employeur à fournir l’EPI sans frais à chaque travailleur et à le former sur la façon d’utiliser et d’inspecter convenablement l’EPI.

Le Code de pratique EPI Activités commerciales de plongée fournit des directives et des renseignements concernant les exisgences réglementaires et les normes de l'Association canadienne de normalisation (CSA), comme CSA Z275.2 Règles de sécurité pour les travailleurs en plongée et CSA Z275.4 Norme de compétence pour les opérations de plongée. En outre, l’employeur doit déterminer l’EPI approprié en fonction d’une évaluation des dangers, car ni le Code ni la norme CSA ne peuvent anticiper chaque scénario/tâche où l’EPI pourrait s’avérer nécessaire pour des activités commerciales de plongée. Cette évaluation devrait :

  • identifier les dangers possibles liés à chaque étape de la plongée. Si le travail s’avère trop complexe, le diviser en plusieurs tâches et préparer une évaluation des dangers pour chacune d’elles;
  • examiner les causes possibles d’accident;
  • examiner les risques pour l’environnement et la santé;
  • envisager des situations dans lesquelles il pourrait y avoir, pour une tâche donnée, de nombreux risques qui pourraient occasionner des blessures, comme les conditions environnementales, les charges physiques excessives et les heures de travail/périodes de repopar.

Les employeurs doivent  :

  • informe les travailleurs des évaluations des dangers et leur indique l’EPI nécessaire;
  • communique aux travailleurs le plan de plongée et s’assure qu’ils le comprennent;
  • évalue l’efficacité des mesures de contrôle avant que la personne ne plonge à l’eau;
  • sensibilise et forme les travailleurs au sujet de l’utilisation et de l’entretien convenables de l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée. Les renseignements suivants doivent être inclus :
    • pourquoi l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée est nécessaire,
    • quand les travailleurs doivent porter l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée,
    • comment porter l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée,
    • comment inspecter l’EPI pour y déceler toute marque d’usure,
    • comment nettoyer l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée et en assurer l’entretien,
    • ce qui est considéré comme une mauvaise utilisation de l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée (p. ex., modifications),
    • quand l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée doit être retourné et/ou remplacé;
  • s’assure que seuls des travailleurs compétents sont affectés aux activités de plongée;
  • s’assure que les travailleurs respectent les tables et protocoles de décompression publiés ou approuvés par Recherche et développement pour la défense Canada, à Toronto;
  • s’assure que les travailleurs font l’objet d’un bilan de santé complet au moins annuellement, avant d’effectuer une plongée conformément à la norme CSA Z275.2-11;
  • exige du travailleur qu’il fournisse une attestation de bonne santé, copie qu’il conservera pendant la durée d’emploi du travailleur;
  • veille à ce que les activités de plongée soient effectuées sous la direction d’un superviseur et donne à ce dernier des ressources adéquates pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des plongeurs;
  • s’assure qu’il y a un nombre suffisant de travailleurs pour que les plongées se fassent en toute sécurité;
  • s’assure qu’il y a un plongeur en alerte qui est formé, muni de l’équipement nécessaire et prêt à prêter assistance à un plongeur immergé dans une situation d’urgence;
  • désigne un travailleur comme assistant de plongée ayant pour tâche exclusive de surveiller le plongeur;
  • s’assure que le mélange respiratoire utilisé par le plongeur est salubre, sain et que l’alimentation en air est suffisante pour la plongée. En outre, il doit y avoir une alimentation équivalant à 2,5 fois la quantité nécessaire pour la plongée;
  • s’assure que tout air ou mélange gazeux utilisé comme mélange respiratoire respecte la norme CSA Z180 « Air comprimé respirable et systèmes connexes » en matière de composition et de pureté des mélanges respiratoires;
  • s’assure qu’un protocole et un temps de décompression appropriés sont respectés si le mélange respiratoire est constitué d’un mélange gazeux;
  • s’assure que tout l’équipement de plongée est exempt de défauts, conservé dans un état adéquat, protégé et examiné et vérifié conformément aux indications techniques du fabricant;
  • interdit les plongées à moins qu’une base de plongée ait été installée, équipée et entretenue de la manière appropriée;
  • fournit une chambre hyperbare répondant à la norme CSA Z275.1 « Normes des caissons » si des plongées susceptibles de dépasser la limite de décompression sont prévues ou si la profondeur de la descente dépasse 50 m;
  • s’assure que chaque plongée professionnelle est supervisée par un directeur de plongée bien informé et compétent. Le directeur doit bien connaître les techniques utilisées, doit rester sur place et doit contrôler directement la plongée.
  • s’assure que le directeur de plongée lui soumet un plan de plongée avant le début de cette dernière. Ce plan doit comprendre les instructions à suivre et décrire l’équipement nécessaire, la quantité de mélange respiratoire et les plans de secours pour assurer la santé et la sécurité du plongeur;
  • permet seulement la plongée libre s’il est impossible de recourir à la plongée avec plongeur rattaché à la surface;
  • s’assure, durant une plongée avec appareil de plongée autonome, que le plongeur utilise un équipement à circuit ouvert, une bouteille de secours, un cordage de sécurité et un survêtement ou un vêtement de protection adapté aux conditions de travail et à la température de l’eau;
  • s’assure que les plongeurs équipés d’un appareil de plongée autonome ne plongent pas à plus de 50 m ou sans un cordage de sécurité sous la glace ou s’il y a du danger;
  • s’assure que le plongeur utilise un mélange respiratoire pour les plongées à plus de 50 mètres;
  • s’assure que les plongées en narghilé sont effectuées à l’aide de l’équipement convenable, soit des cordages de sécurité, des tuyaux d’air, une bouteille de secours et un moyen de communication bilatérale efficace.

Les travailleurs (plongeurs) doivent:

  • utilise l’EPI pour des activités commerciales de plongée conformément aux instructions et à la formation reçues;
  • inspecte l’EPI immédiatement avant chaque plongée effectuée dans le cadre d’activités commerciales;
  • vérifie, en submergeant toutes les pièces d’équipement, qu’il n’y a aucune fuite et que tout fonctionne bien au début de chaque plongée;
  • retourne à l’employeur l’EPI défectueux utilisé pour des activités commerciales et l’informe de cette défectuosité;
  • suit le plan de plongée et les instructions du directeur de plongée;
  • tient un journal de plongée personnel qu’il conservera pendant les cinq années qui suivent;
  • s’assure qu’il connaît toutes les exigences énoncées à l’article 305 lorsqu’il a recours à la plongée en binôme.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure du possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Section 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, le matériel de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou mises en place conformément au présent règlement.

Part 20 ACTIVITÉS DE PLONGÉE

Section 291 Travailleurs compétents

291. L’employeur s’assure que seuls des travailleurs compétents sont affectés aux activités de plongée.

Section 292 Normes

292. L’employeur s’assure que les activités de plongée, les plongées répétées et le soin des plongeurs sont effectués dans le respect rigoureux des tables et protocoles de décompression publiés ou approuvés par Recherche et développement pour la défense Canada, à Toronto (organisme connu auparavant sous le nom d’Institut militaire et civil de médecine environnementale), ou par une autre agence agréée.

Section 293 Bilan de santé

293. (1) L’employeur qui engage un plongeur s’assure que celui-ci se fait faire un bilan de santé complet :

a) par un professionnel des soins de santé au moins tous les 12 mois;

b) conformément aux critères établis dans les annexes A et B de la norme CAN/CSA-Z275.2-11 - Règles de sécurité pour les travailleurs en plongée de l’Association canadienne de normalisation, dans ses versions successives.

(2) Les plongeurs ne doivent pas faire de plongées tant qu’un professionnel de la santé n’a pas, conformément au paragraphe (1), attesté que leur état de santé leur permet d’effectuer le type de plongée requis.

(3) Le plongeur :

a) fournit à l’employeur une copie de son attestation de bonne santé, comme le prévoit le paragraphe (2);

b) insére l’original de cette attestation dans son journal de plongée personnel, conformément à l’article 304.

(4) L’employeur :

a) s’assure de n’obliger ni d’autoriser aucun plongeur à faire des plongées tant que le plongeur ne lui a pas fourni d’attestation de bonne santé dans les 12 mois précédents, conformément a u paragraphe (2);

b) conserve une copie de l’attestation de bonne santé du plongeur visée à l’alinéa a) tant que le plongeur travaille pour lui.

Section 294 Directeur de plongée

294. L’employeur :

a) s’assure que les activités de plongée sont effectuées sous la direction de superviseurs de plongée;

b) donne aux superviseurs de plongée les informations et les ressources nécessaires pour préserver la santé et la sécurité de chaque plongeur sous leur direction.

Section 295 Effectif minimal

295. L’employeur s’assure qu’il y a un nombre de travailleurs suffisant pour que les plongées se fassent en toute sécurité.

Section 296 Plongeur en alerte

296. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

«équipé» Se dit d’une personne qui porte un équipement de plongée complet et qui est prête à s’immerger, dont les systèmes de survie et de communication ont été vérifiés et sont à portée de la main, et dont le casque, la visière ou le masque facial est en place ou non.

«plongeur en alerte» Plongeur :

a) se trouvant au lieu de plongée, prêt à prêter assistance à un plongeur immergé dans une situation d’urgence;

b) équipé;

c) formé et muni de l’équipement nécessaire pour intervenir à la profondeur à laquelle travaille le plongeur immergé et dans la situation dans laquelle ce dernier travaille.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’il y a un plongeur en alerte sur place lorsque des plongées ont lieu.

(3) L’employeur ne doit pas obliger ni autoriser un plongeur en alerte à plonger dans une situation autre qu’une situation d’urgence.

Section 297 Assistant de plongée

297. (1) L’employeur désigne un assistant de plongée pour surveiller les plongées d’un plongeur.

(2) L’assistant de plongée doit bien connaître le fonctionnement des appareils utilisés pour la plongée, l’activité de plongée en cours et les protocoles et signaux d’urgence à appliquer entre plongeur et assistant de plongée.

(3) L’employeur s’assure :

a) qu’un assistant de plongée convenable est affecté à chaque plongeur immergé durant une plongée;

b) que l’assistant de plongée consacre tout son temps et toute son attention à son travail.

Section 298 Mélange respiratoire

298. (1) Dans le présent article, «mélange gazeux» s’entend d’un mélange de gaz respirable autre que l’air qui fournit assez d’oxygène pour assurer la vie, qui ne nuit pas excessivement à la respiration ni aux fonctions neurologiques et qui n’a aucun autre effet physiologique néfaste.

(2) Lorsqu’un plongeur utilise l’air comme mélange respiratoire, l’employeur s’assure :

a) que cet air est salubre et que l’alimentation du plongeur en air est suffisante;

b) qu’une alimentation équivalant à 2,5 fois la quantité nécessaire pour la plongée est fournie.

(3) L’employeur s’assure que tout air ou mélange gazeux utilisé comme mélange respiratoire par un plongeur respecte la norme approuvée en matière de composition et de pureté des mélanges respiratoires.

(4) Lorsqu’un mélange gazeux est utilisé comme mélange respiratoire par un plongeur, l’employeur s’assure que les procédures, temps et tables de décompression utilisés conviennent au mélange gazeux.

Section 299 Équipement de plongée

299. L’employeur s’assure que tout l’équipement de plongée, notamment l’appareil respiratoire, les compresseurs, les bouteilles de gaz comprimé, les valves de contrôle du gaz, les manomètres, les dispositifs accompagnant les réserves de gaz, les tubes, les casques, les treuils, les câbles, les cloches et plateformes de plongée, et tous autres accessoires nécessaires à la sécurité des plongées :

a) est de conception approuvée, de fabrication solide, de force adéquate et exempt de défauts apparents;

b) est conservé dans un état qui assure son intégrité continue et le rend propre à l’utilisation;

c) est bien protégé contre toute défaillance susceptible d’être causée à basse température par l’air ambiant, l’eau ou l’expansion du gaz;

d) est examiné, vérifié, révisé et réparé conformément aux indications techniques du fabricant.

Section 300 Base de plongée

300. (1) L’employeur ne doit pas exiger ni permettre de plongées lorsque aucune base de plongée n’est installée avant la plongée ni maintenue durant celle-ci.

(2) Pendant toute plongée, l’employeur s’assure que la base de plongée est munie de ce qui suit :

a) lorsqu’on utilise un appareil de plongée autonome, un appareil de plongée autonome de rechange complet avec bouteilles remplies au maximum, à utiliser seulement en cas d’urgence;

b) une quantité d’oxygène suffisante à des fins thérapeutiques;

c) un filin de guidage de manille de 19 mm de diamètre lesté, assez long pour atteindre le fond à la profondeur maximale de l’eau au lieu de plongée;

d) une trousse de premiers soins qui convient au nombre de travailleurs et au lieu de travail;

e) un ensemble complet de tables de décompression;

f) une pièce bien chauffée à l’usage des plongeurs, qui se trouve sur le lieu de plongée ou qui en est le plus près possible;

g) tout autre équipement qui pourrait être nécessaire pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs.

Section 301 Chambre hyperbare

301. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

«chambre hyperbare de catégorie A» Chambre hyperbare qui répond aux exigences relatives aux chambres hyperbares de la catégorie A établies dans la norme Z275.1-05 - Caissons hyperbares de l’Association canadienne de normalisation, dans ses versions successives.

«limite de décompression» Le point de la descente, fondé sur la profondeur et la durée de la plongée et établi conformément à une table de décompression, au-delà duquel le plongeur aura besoin de faire au moins un palier de décompression pendant la remontée s’il continue de descendre.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’il y a une chambre hyperbare de catégorie A en état de fonctionner sur le lieu de travail dans les cas suivants :

a) si une plongée susceptible de dépasser la limite de décompression est prévue;

b) si la profondeur de la descente dépasse 50 m.

Section 302 Plan de plongée

302. (1) Dans le présent article, «personnel en surface» s’entend de l’effectif minimal requis à l’article 295, à savoir le directeur de plongée, le plongeur en alerte et l’assistant de plongée.

(2) Le directeur de plongée soumet à l’employeur un plan de plongée général avant le début d’une plongée.

(3) Le directeur de plongée :

a) planifie la plongée de manière à préserver la santé et la sécurité du plongeur;

b) instruit le personnel en surface des protocoles à suivre pour préserver la santé et la sécurité du plongeur;

c) s’assure que tout l’équipement nécessaire est sur place et en bon état;

d) s’assure que la quantité de mélange respiratoire fournie au plongeur suffit pour la plongée prévue;

e) met au point et applique un plan de secours pour toute situation d’urgence raisonnablement prévisible susceptible de mettre en danger le plongeur;

f) tient un journal montrant les activités quotidiennes de chaque plongeur et consigne les renseignements concernant chaque plongée le jour même où elle est effectuée;

g) reste dans la zone immédiate de la plongée pendant son déroulement;

h) s’assure que chaque plongeur consigne dans son journal de plongée personnel les renseignements exigés à l’alinéa 304(3)a) pour chacune de ses plongées;

i) vérifie l’exactitude des renseignements consignés dans le journal de plongée personnel de chaque plongeur comme l’exige l’alinéa 304(3)a) et signe l’entrée pour confirmer la vérification du directeur de plongée.

(4) Le présent article n’a pas pour effet de limiter les responsabilités qui incombent à l’employeur en application de la présente partie.

Section 303 Responsabilités générales du plongeur

303. Le plongeur :

a) suit le plan de plongée général et les instructions du directeur de plongée;

b) inspecte son équipement immédiatement avant chaque plongée;

c) commence chaque plongée en submergeant et en vérifiant toutes les pièces d’équipement pour s’assurer qu’il n’y a aucune fuite et que tout fonctionne bien.

Section 304 Journal de plongée personnel

304. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

«durée du séjour au fond» Le temps total écoulé, en minutes, entre le moment où un plongeur en descente quitte la surface de l’eau et le moment où il commence la remontée finale.

«recompression thérapeutique» S’entend du traitement, habituellement en chambre hyperbare, d’un plongeur souffrant de maladie de la décompression.

(2) Le plongeur tient un journal de plongée personnel qu’il conservera pendant les cinq années qui suivent.

(3) Le plongeur consigne dans son journal de plongée personnel, en ordre chronologique :

a) une entrée pour chacune de ses plongées, vérifiée et signée par le directeur de plongée et indiquant :

(i) le type d’appareil de plongée utilisé,

(ii) le mélange respiratoire utilisé,

(iii) l’heure à laquelle il a quitté la surface,

(iv) la durée du séjour au fond,

(v) la profondeur maximale atteinte,

(vi) l’heure à laquelle il a commencé sa remontée,

(vii) l’heure à laquelle il a atteint la surface,

(viii) l’intervalle entre les immersions, s’il a effectué plus d’une plongée au cours d’une journée,

(ix) la table de décompression utilisée et l’horaire suivi,

(x) la date de la plongée,

(xi) toute observation relative à sa santé ou à sa sécurité découlant de la plongée,

(xii) le nom de l’employeur;

b) une entrée signée par le médecin ou le directeur de plongée de service concernant toute recompression thérapeutique ou toute autre exposition à un milieu hyperbare.

Section 305 Plongée en binome

305. (1) La plongée en binôme est le recours à deux plongeurs (binômes) qui sont chacun responsables de la sécurité de l’autre.

(2) Le plongeur qui effectue une plongée en binôme :

a) garde constamment le contact visuel avec son binôme pendant la plongée;

b) doit connaître les signaux de la main utilisés et confirmer la réception de chaque signal donné;

c) ne doit pas se séparer de son binôme sauf en cas d’urgence nécessitant l’assistance d’un des binômes;

d) interrompt immédiatement la plongée si son binôme se sépare de lui ou si ce dernier interrompt la plongée.

Section 306 Plongée libre

306. (1) Dans le présent article, «plongée libre» s’entend du fait, pour un plongeur, d’effectuer une plongée avec un appareil de plongée autonome sous supervision mais sans être rattaché à la surface par un cordage de sécurité ou un flotteur.

(2) L’employeur s’assure de recourir à la plongée libre seulement s’il est impossible de recourir en toute sécurité à la plongée avec plongeur rattaché à la surface.

(3) L’employeur ne doit pas obliger ni autoriser un plongeur à effectuer une plongée libre, sauf si les conditions suivantes sont réunies :

a) si le plongeur est accompagné d’un plongeur en alerte immergé et relié à la surface, ou s’il plonge en binôme;

b) s’il s’est d’abord assuré que les conditions permettent la plongée libre en toute sécurité.

Section 307 Plongée avec un appareil de plongée autonome

307. (1) L’employeur s’assure que, durant une plongée avec appareil de plongée autonome, le plongeur utilise :

a) un appareil de plongée autonome à circuit ouvert muni d’un détendeur à alimentation sur demande et d’une bouteille avec harnais à dégrafage rapide;

b) un dispositif ou une bouteille de secours;

c) un cordage de sécurité, sauf s’il plonge en binôme;

d) un survêtement ou un vêtement de protection adapté aux conditions de travail et à la température de l’eau.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’un plongeur équipé d’un appareil de plongée autonome ne plonge pas :

a) soit à plus de 50 m;

b) soit sans cordage de sécurité, selon le cas :

(i) sous la glace,

(ii) s’il y a du danger, en raison notamment des courants d’eau, d’une mauvaise visibilité ou d’intempéries.

Section 308 Plongée en narghilé

308. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

«ombilical» Faisceau composé d’un tuyau et d’un câble multiples ou de tuyaux et de câbles séparés :

a) qui vont de la surface au plongeur ou à une chambre submersible occupée par le plongeur;

b) qui alimentent le plongeur en mélange respiratoire, en électricité et en chaleur et qui lui permettent de garder la communication.

«plongée en narghilé» Méthode de plongée suivant laquelle le plongeur est alimenté en mélange gazeux avec un ombilical relié à la surface.

(2) Lorsqu’un plongeur doit ou peut effectuer une plongée en narghilé, l’employeur s’assure :

a) que l’ombilical comporte un cordage de sécurité permettant d’éviter la tension sur le tuyau;

b) que les raccords entre le tuyau d’air et l’équipement alimentant le plongeur en mélange respiratoire sont fixés solidement et bien protégés de manière à empêcher le débranchement accidentel ou les dommages;

c) que le tuyau d’air est muni de ce qui suit, dans l’ordre, à partir du raccord à la surface :

(i) une valve de régulation sur laquelle il est indiqué clairement quel plongeur est alimenté par le tuyau,

(ii) un manomètre facile d’accès et bien visible pour l’assistant de plongée,

(iii) une valve anti-retour au point de raccord du tuyau d’air et du casque ou masque de plongée;

d) que le plongeur transporte une bouteille de secours;

e) que le plongeur est muni d’un cordage de sécurité et d’un moyen de communication bilatérale efficace entre lui et l’assistant de plongée visé à l’article 297.

Part 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Section 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ni d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur de la défectuosité ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure de ce qui est raisonnablement possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Article 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, l’équipement de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou élaborées conformément au présent règlement.

Partie 20 ACTIVITÉS DE PLONGÉE

Article 291 Travailleurs compétents

291. L’employeur s’assure que seuls des travailleurs compétents sont obligés ou autorisés à effectuer des activités de plongée.

Article 292 Normes

292. L’employeur s’assure que les activités de plongée, les plongées répétées et le soin des plongeurs sont effectués dans le respect rigoureux des tables et protocoles de décompression publiés ou approuvés par Recherche et développement pour la défense Canada, à Toronto (organisme connu auparavant sous le nom d’Institut militaire et civil de médecine environnementale), ou par un autre organisme approuvé.

Article 293 Bilan de santé

293. (1) L’employeur qui engage un plongeur s’assure que celui-ci se fait faire un bilan de santé complet :

a) par un professionnel des soins de santé au moins tous les 12 mois;

b) conformément aux critères établis dans les annexes A et B de la norme CAN/CSA-Z275.2-11 - Règles de sécurité pour les travailleurs en plongée de l’Association canadienne de normalisation, dans ses versions successives.

(2) Les plongeurs ne doivent pas faire de plongées tant qu’un professionnel de la santé n’a pas, conformément au paragraphe (1), attesté que leur état de santé leur permet d’effectuer le type de plongée requis.

(3) Le plongeur :

a) d’une part, fournit à l’employeur une copie de l’attestation visée au paragraphe (2);

b) d’autre part, insère l’original de cette attestation dans son journal de plongée personnel, conformément à l’article 304.

(4) L’employeur :

a) s’assure de n’obliger ni d’autoriser aucun plongeur à faire des plongées tant que le plongeur ne lui a pas fourni une copie de l’attestation obtenue en vertu du paragraphe (2) au cours des 12 mois précédents;

b) conserve une copie de l’attestation visée à l’alinéa a) tant que le plongeur travaille pour lui.

Article 294 Directeur de plongée

294. L’employeur :

a) d’une part, s’assure que les activités de plongée sont effectuées sous la direction de superviseurs de plongée;

b) d’autre part, donne aux superviseurs de plongée les renseignements et les ressources nécessaires pour protéger la santé et la sécurité de chaque plongeur sous leur direction.

Article 295 Effectif minimal

295. L’employeur s’assure qu’il y a un nombre de travailleurs suffisant pour que les plongées se fassent en toute sécurité.

Article 296 Plongeur en alerte

296. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

« équipé » S’entend d’une personne qui porte un équipement de plongée complet et qui est prête à s’immerger, dont les systèmes de survie et de communication ont été vérifiés et sont à portée de la main, et dont le casque, la visière ou le masque facial est en place ou non.

« plongeur en alerte » Plongeur qui, à la fois :

a) se trouve au lieu de plongée, prêt à prêter assistance à un plongeur immergé dans une situation d’urgence;

b) est équipé;

c) a suivi une formation sur le fonctionnement de l’équipement nécessaire pour intervenir à la profondeur à laquelle travaille le plongeur immergé et dans la situation dans laquelle ce dernier travaille et est muni de cet équipement.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’il y a un plongeur en alerte sur place lorsque des plongées ont lieu.

(3) L’employeur ne doit pas obliger ni autoriser un plongeur en alerte à plonger dans une situation autre qu’une situation d’urgence.

Article 297 Assistant de plongée

297. (1) L’employeur désigne un assistant de plongée pour surveiller les plongées d’un plongeur.

(2) L’assistant de plongée doit être compétent dans le fonctionnement des appareils utilisés pour la plongée, dans l’activité de plongée en cours et dans les protocoles et signaux d’urgence à appliquer entre plongeur et assistant de plongée.

(3) L’employeur s’assure :

a) d’autre part, qu’un assistant de plongée qui convient au plongeur est affecté à chaque plongeur immergé durant une plongée;

b) d’autre part, que l’assistant de plongée consacre tout son temps et toute son attention à son travail.

Article 298 Mélange respiratoire

298. (1) Dans le présent article, « mélange gazeux » s’entend d’un mélange de gaz respirable autre que l’air qui fournit assez d’oxygène pour assurer la vie, qui ne nuit pas excessivement à la respiration ni aux fonctions neurologiques et qui n’a aucun autre effet physiologique néfaste.

(2) Lorsqu’un plongeur utilise l’air comme mélange respiratoire, l’employeur s’assure :

a) d’une part, que cet air est salubre et que l’alimentation du plongeur en air est suffisante;

b) d’autre part, qu’une alimentation équivalant à 2,5 fois la quantité nécessaire pour la plongée est fournie.

(3) L’employeur s’assure que tout air ou mélange gazeux utilisé comme mélange respiratoire par un plongeur respecte la norme approuvée en matière de composition et de pureté des mélanges respiratoires.

(4) Lorsqu’un mélange gazeux est utilisé comme mélange respiratoire par un plongeur, l’employeur s’assure que les procédures, temps et tables de décompression utilisés conviennent au mélange gazeux.

Article 299 Équipement de plongée

299. L’employeur s’assure que tout l’équipement de plongée, notamment l’appareil respiratoire, les compresseurs, les bouteilles de gaz comprimé, les valves de contrôle du gaz, les manomètres, les dispositifs accompagnant les réserves de gaz, les tubes, les casques, les treuils, les câbles, les cloches et plate-formes de plongée ainsi que tout autre accessoire nécessaire à la sécurité des plongées, à la fois :

a) est de conception approuvée, de construction solide, de force adéquate et exempt de défauts apparents;

b) est conservé dans un état qui assure son intégrité continue et le rend propre à l’utilisation;

c) est bien protégé contre toute défaillance susceptible d’être causée à basse température par l’air ambiant, l’eau ou l’expansion du gaz;

d) est examiné, mis à l’essai, révisé et réparé conformément aux indications techniques du fabricant.

Article 300 Base de plongée

300. (1) L’employeur ne doit permettre de plongées sauf si une base de plongée est installée avant la plongée et maintenue durant celle-ci.

(2) Pendant toute plongée en cours, l’employeur s’assure que la base de plongée est munie de ce qui suit :

a) lorsqu’on utilise un appareil de plongée autonome, un appareil de plongée autonome de rechange complet avec bouteilles remplies au maximum, à utiliser seulement en cas d’urgence;

b) une quantité d’oxygène suffisante à des fins thérapeutiques;

c) un filin de guidage de manille de 19 mm de diamètre lesté, assez long pour atteindre le fond à la profondeur maximale de l’eau au lieu de plongée;

d) une trousse de premiers soins qui convient au nombre de travailleurs et au lieu de travail;

e) un ensemble complet de tables de décompression;

f) une installation chauffée convenable à l’usage des plongeurs, qui se trouve au lieu de plongée ou qui en est le plus près possible;

g) tout autre équipement qui pourrait être nécessaire pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs.

Article 301 Chambre hyperbare

301. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

« chambre hyperbare de catégorie A » Chambre hyperbare qui répond aux exigences relatives aux chambres hyperbares de la catégorie A établies dans la norme Z275.1-05 - Caissons hyperbares de l’Association canadienne de normalisation, dans ses versions successives.

« limite de décompression » Le point de la descente, fondé sur la profondeur et la durée de la plongée et établi conformément à une table de décompression, au-delà duquel le plongeur aura besoin de faire au moins un palier de décompression pendant la remontée s’il continue de descendre.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’il y a une chambre hyperbare de catégorie A en état de fonctionner sur le lieu de travail dans les cas suivants :

a) si une plongée susceptible de dépasser la limite de décompression est prévue;

b) si la profondeur de la descente dépasse 50 m.

Article 302 Plan de plongée

302. (1) Dans le présent article, « personnel en surface » s’entend de l’effectif minimal requis à l’article 295, à savoir le directeur de plongée, le plongeur en alerte et l’assistant de plongée.

(2) Le directeur de plongée soumet à l’employeur un plan de plongée général écrit avant le début d’une plongée.

(3) Le directeur de plongée à la fois :

a) planifie la plongée de manière à préserver la santé et la sécurité du plongeur;

b) instruit le personnel en surface des procédures à suivre pour préserver la santé et la sécurité du plongeur;

c) s’assure que tout l’équipement nécessaire est disponible et en bon état;

d) s’assure que la quantité de mélange respiratoire fournie au plongeur suffit pour la plongée prévue;

e) élabore et applique un plan de secours pour toute situation d’urgence raisonnablement prévisible susceptible de mettre en danger le plongeur;

f) tient un journal de bord montrant les activités quotidiennes de chaque plongeur et consigne les renseignements concernant chaque plongée le jour même où elle est effectuée;

g) reste dans la zone immédiate de la plongée pendant son déroulement;

h) s’assure que chaque plongeur consigne dans son journal de plongée personnel les renseignements exigés à l’alinéa 304(3)a) pour chacune de ses plongées;

i) vérifie l’exactitude des renseignements exigés à l’alinéa 304(3)a) qui sont consignés dans le journal de plongée personnel de chaque plongeur et signe l’entrée pour confirmer la vérification du directeur de plongée.

(4) Le présent article n’a pas pour effet de limiter les responsabilités qui incombent à l’employeur en application de la présente partie.

Article 303 Responsabilités générales du plongeur

303. Le plongeur :

a) suit le plan de plongée général et les instructions du directeur de plongée;

b) inspecte son équipement immédiatement avant chaque plongée;

c) commence chaque plongée en submergeant et en vérifiant toutes les pièces d’équipement pour s’assurer qu’il n’y a aucune fuite et que tout fonctionne bien.

Article 304 Journal de plongée personnel

304. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

« durée du séjour au fond » Le temps total écoulé, en minutes, entre le moment où un plongeur en descente quitte la surface de l’eau et le moment où il commence la remontée finale.

« recompression thérapeutique » S’entend du traitement, habituellement en chambre hyperbare, d’un plongeur souffrant de maladie de la décompression.

(2) Le plongeur tient un journal de plongée personnel qu’il conservera pendant les cinq années qui suivent.

(3) Le plongeur consigne dans son journal de plongée personnel, en ordre chronologique :

a) une entrée pour chacune de ses plongées, vérifiée et signée par le directeur de plongée et indiquant ce qui suit :

(i) le type d’appareil de plongée utilisé,

(ii) le mélange respiratoire utilisé,

(iii) l’heure à laquelle il a quitté la surface,

(iv) la durée du séjour au fond,

(v) la profondeur maximale atteinte,

(vi) l’heure à laquelle il a commencé sa remontée,

(vii) l’heure à laquelle il a atteint la surface,

(viii) l’intervalle entre les immersions, s’il a effectué plus d’une plongée au cours d’une journée,

(ix) la table de décompression utilisée et l’horaire suivi,

(x) la date de la plongée,

(xi) toute observation relative à sa santé ou à sa sécurité découlant de la plongée,

(xii) le nom de l’employeur;

b) une entrée signée par le médecin traitant ou le directeur de plongée concernant toute recompression thérapeutique ou toute autre exposition à un milieu hyperbare.

Article 305 Plongée en binôme

305. (1) La plongée en binôme est le recours à deux plongeurs (binômes) qui sont chacun responsables de la sécurité de l’autre.

(2) Le plongeur qui effectue une plongée en binôme à la fois :

a) garde constamment le contact visuel avec son binôme pendant la plongée;

b) connaît les signaux de la main utilisés et confirme la réception de chaque signal donné;

c) ne se sépare pas de son binôme sauf en cas d’urgence nécessitant l’assistance d’un des binômes;

d) interrompt immédiatement la plongée si son binôme se sépare de lui ou si ce dernier interrompt la plongée.

Article 306 Plongée libre

306. (1) Dans le présent article, « plongée libre » s’entend du fait, pour un plongeur, d’effectuer une plongée avec un appareil de plongée autonome sous supervision mais sans être rattaché à la surface par un cordage de sécurité ou un flotteur.

(2) L’employeur s’assure de recourir à la plongée libre seulement s’il est impossible de recourir en toute sécurité à la plongée avec plongeur rattaché à la surface.

(3) L’employeur ne doit pas obliger ni autoriser un plongeur à effectuer une plongée libre, sauf si les conditions suivantes sont réunies :

a) soit le plongeur est accompagné d’un plongeur en alerte immergé et relié à la surface, soit il plonge en binôme;

b) l’employeur s’est d’abord assuré que les conditions permettent la plongée libre en toute sécurité.

Article 307 Plongée avec un appareil de plongée autonome

307. (1) L’employeur s’assure que, durant une plongée avec appareil de plongée autonome, le plongeur utilise ce qui suit :

a) un appareil de plongée autonome à circuit ouvert muni d’un détendeur à alimentation sur demande et d’une bouteille avec harnais à dégrafage rapide;

b) un dispositif ou une bouteille de secours;

c) un cordage de sécurité, sauf s’il plonge en binôme;

d) un survêtement ou un vêtement de protection adapté aux conditions de travail et à la température de l’eau.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’un plongeur équipé d’un appareil de plongée autonome ne plonge pas :

a) soit à plus de 50 m;

b) soit sans cordage de sécurité, selon le cas :

(i) sous la glace,

(ii) s’il y a du danger, en raison notamment des courants d’eau, d’une mauvaise visibilité ou d’intempéries.

Article 308 Plongée en narghilé

308. (1) Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent au présent article.

« ombilical » Faisceau composé d’un tuyau et d’un câble multiples ou de tuyaux et de câbles séparés :

a) d’une part, qui vont de la surface au plongeur ou à une chambre submersible occupée par le plongeur;

b) d’autre part, qui alimentent le plongeur en mélange respiratoire, en électricité et en chaleur et qui lui permettent de garder la communication.

« plongée en narghilé » Méthode de plongée suivant laquelle le plongeur est alimenté en mélange gazeux avec un ombilical relié à la surface.

(2) Lorsqu’un plongeur est obligé ou autorisé à effectuer une plongée en narghilé, l’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) l’ombilical comporte un cordage de sécurité permettant d’éviter la tension sur le tuyau;

b) les raccords entre le tuyau d’air et l’équipement alimentant le plongeur en mélange respiratoire sont fixés solidement et bien protégés de manière à empêcher le débranchement accidentel ou les dommages;

c) le tuyau d’air est muni de ce qui suit, dans l’ordre, à partir du raccord à la surface :

(i) une valve de régulation sur laquelle il est indiqué clairement quel plongeur est alimenté par le tuyau,

(ii) un manomètre facile d’accès et bien visible pour l’assistant de plongée,

(iii) une valve anti-retour au point de raccord du tuyau d’air et du casque ou masque de plongée;

d) le plongeur transporte une bouteille de secours;

e) le plongeur est muni d’un cordage de sécurité et d’un moyen de communication bilatérale efficace entre lui et l’assistant de plongée visé à l’article 297.

Partie 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Article 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) d’une part, sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) d’autre part, a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur du défaut ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).