Home

Occupational Health and Safety Programs

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

An essential part of keeping workers safe and improving an organization’s safety culture (Internal Responsibility System, IRS) is the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Program and the components that drive it. OHS Programs are required for employers with 20 or more workers or when an employer is directed by the Chief Safety Officer to have one. A large component of the OHS Program’s success is worker buy-in. By involving workers in each step of the OHS Program creation and roll-out, workers are given the opportunity to provide valuable feedback, which improves the OHS Program’s effectiveness. The WSCC Occupational Health and Safety Program Code of Practice provides details for different components of the program, a sample OHS Program table of contents, and recommendations for constructing the items under each header. The Code also contains forms employers are encouraged to adapt to meet their individual needs. The Awareness Change Teach Initiate Observe Notify (A.C.T.I.O.N.) form can be used for incidents where hazards have been controlled and workers have not been injured. The Incident Investigation Report provides plenty of space for collecting evidence, determining unsafe acts, unsafe conditions, indirect causes, and root causes for incidents.

An OHS Program is a compilation of policies and procedures developed for the purpose of decreasing the occurrence of workplace disease and illness. Each OHS Program is as unique as the establishment or organization it is created for. From formal assessments to preventative maintenance and informal inspections, an OHS Program provides multiple opportunities for management, supervisors, and workers to discover and address hazards before an incident occurs. A multiple-level program is much more efficient at reducing injuries, because it is based on the understanding that hazards never stop presenting themselves; people just stop looking for them.

An OHS Program must be in writing and made available to workers and it must include:

  • a statement from the employer on the establishment’s policy for protection of the health and safety of workers;
  • a hazard recognition program, including identification, assessment and control;
  • emergency measures and procedures, and identification of internal and external resources and personnel for emergency response;
  • a statement of responsibilities for the employer, supervisors, and workers;
  • an inspection schedule for the work site, processes, and procedures;
  • a plan for controlling hazardous substances, including how they are handled, used, stored, produced, and disposed;
  • a training plan for workers and supervisors;
  • investigation procedures for safe work refusals;
  • a strategy for getting workers involved in occupational health and safety; and
  • a procedure to review the OHS Program at minimum once every three years, or when circumstances change which could impact the health and safety of workers.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 21 Occupational health and safety Program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

SAFETY ACT
R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. S-1

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 4 Duty of employer

4. (1) Every employer shall

(a) maintain his or her establishment in such a manner that the health and safety of persons in the establishment are not likely to be endangered;

(b) take all reasonable precautions and adopt and carry out all reasonable techniques and procedures to ensure the health and safety of every person in his or her establishment; and

(c) provide the first aid service requirements set out in the regulations pertaining to his or her class of establishment.

(2) If two or more employers have charge of an establishment, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner of the establishment, shall coordinate the activities of the employers in the establishment to ensure the health and safety of persons in the establishment.

[S.N.W.T. 2003, c. 25, s. 3]

Section 5 Duty of worker

5. Every worker employed on or in connection with an establishment shall, in the course of his or her employment,

(a) take all reasonable precautions to ensure his or her own safety and the safety of other persons in the establishment; and

(b) as the circumstances require, use devices and articles of clothing or equipment that are intended for his or her protection and provided to the worker by his or her employer, or required pursuant to the regulations to be used or worn by the worker.

Section 7 Safety Program

7. Every employer shall implement and maintain an occupational health and safety program for a work site as required by the regulations.

[S.N.W.T. 2014, c. 10, s. 21; 2015, c. 30, s. 4]

Section 13 Definition of unusual danger

13. (1) In this section, "unusual danger" means, in relation to any work

(a) a danger that does not normally exist in that work; or

(b) a danger under which a person engaged in that work would not normally carry out his or her work.

(2) A worker may refuse to do any work where the worker has reason to believe that

(a) there exists an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker;

(b) the carrying out of the work is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person; or

(c) the operation of any tool, appliance, machine, device or thing is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person.

(3) On refusing to work, the worker shall promptly report the circumstances of his or her refusal to the employer or supervisor who shall without delay investigate the report and take steps to eliminate the unusual danger in the presence of the worker and a representative of the worker's union, if there is such, or another worker selected by the worker who shall be made available and who shall attend without delay.

(4) Following the investigation and any steps taken to eliminate the unusual danger, the employer or supervisor, as the case may be, shall notify the worker of the investigation and the steps taken, and where the worker has reasonable grounds to believe that

(a) there exists an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker,

(b) the carrying out of the work is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person, or

(c) the operation of any tool, appliance, machine device or thing is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person,

the worker may refuse to work and the employer, supervisor or worker shall without delay notify the Committee or, where there is no Committee, a delegate of the Chief Safety Officer of the refusal to work.

(5) The Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety Officer, as the case may be, shall, within 24 hours after receiving notification, investigate the circumstances that caused the refusal to work in the presence of the employer, or a person representing the employer, and the worker, and decide whether an unusual danger exists or is likely to exist, as the case may be.

(6) Where it is decided under subsection (5) that an unusual danger exists or is likely to exist, as the case may be, no person shall perform the work until

(a) the employer has taken steps to eliminate the unusual danger, and

(b) the Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety Officer, as the case may be, is satisfied that the unusual danger no longer exists or is no longer likely to exist,

and the Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety officer, on being satisfied of that, shall without delay notify the worker that the unusual danger no longer exists or is no longer likely to exist, as the case may be.

(7) Pending the investigation and decision by the Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety Officer under subsections (5) and (6) or pending an appeal under subsection (9), the worker shall remain in a safe place at or near the place of the investigation during his or her normal working hours unless the employer, subject to the provisions of a collective agreement, if any, assigns the worker to temporary alternative work that the worker is competent to perform.

(8) The worker shall be paid at his or her regular rate of pay during the normal working hours the worker spends at the place of the investigation or in the performance of alternative work.

(9) The worker or the employer may appeal a decision of the Committee to the Chief Safety Officer who shall, as soon as is practicable, investigate and decide on the matter.

(10) Notwithstanding section 17, the decision of the Chief Safety Officer under subsection (9) is final.

[S.N.W.T. 2003, c. 25, s. 9]

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 21 Occupational health and safety program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

SAFETY ACT
R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. S-1

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 4 Duty of employer

4. (1) Every employer shall

(a) maintain his or her establishment in such a manner that the health and safety of persons in the establishment are not likely to be endangered;

(b) take all reasonable precautions and adopt and carry out all reasonable techniques and procedures to ensure the health and safety of every person in his or her establishment; and

(c) provide the first aid service requirements set out in the regulations pertaining to his or her class of establishment.

(2) If two or more employers have charge of an establishment, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner of the establishment, shall coordinate the activities of the employers in the establishment to ensure compliance with subsection 4(1).

[S.Nu. 2003, c. 25, s. 4]

Section 5 Duty of worker

5. Every worker employed on or in connection with an establishment shall, in the course of his or her employment,

(a) take all reasonable precautions to ensure his or her own safety and the safety of other persons in the establishment; and

(b) as the circumstances require, use devices and articles of clothing or equipment that are intended for his or her protection and provided to the worker by his or her employer, or required pursuant to the regulations to be used or worn by the worker.

Section 7 Safety program

7. Every employer shall implement and maintain an occupational health and safety program for a work site as required by the regulations.

[S.Nu. 2015, c. 19, s. 4]

Section 13 Definition of unusual danger

13. (1) In this section, "unusual danger" means, in relation to any work

(a) a danger that does not normally exist in that work; or

(b) a danger under which a person engaged in that work would not normally carry out his or her work.

(2) A worker may refuse to do any work where the worker has reason to believe that

(a) there exists an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker;

(b) the carrying out of the work is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person; or

(c) the operation of any tool, appliance, machine, device or thing is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person.

(3) On refusing to work, the worker shall promptly report the circumstances of his or her refusal to the employer or supervisor who shall without delay investigate the report and take steps to eliminate the unusual danger in the presence of the worker and a representative of the worker's union, if there is such, or another worker selected by the worker who shall be made available and who shall attend without delay.

(4) Following the investigation and any steps taken to eliminate the unusual danger, the employer or supervisor, as the case may be, shall notify the worker of the investigation and the steps taken, and where the worker has reasonable grounds to believe that

(a) there exists an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker,

(b) the carrying out of the work is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person, or

(c) the operation of any tool, appliance, machine device or thing is likely to cause to exist an unusual danger to the health or safety of the worker or of any other person,

the worker may refuse to work and the employer, supervisor or worker shall without delay notify the Committee or, where there is no Committee, a delegate of the Chief Safety Officer of the refusal to work.

(5) The Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety Officer, as the case may be, shall, within 24 hours after receiving notification, investigate the circumstances that caused the refusal to work in the presence of the employer, or a person representing the employer, and the worker, and decide whether an unusual danger exists or is likely to exist, as the case may be.

(6) Where it is decided under subsection (5) that an unusual danger exists or is likely to exist, as the case may be, no person shall perform the work until

(a) the employer has taken steps to eliminate the unusual danger, and

(b) the Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety Officer, as the case may be, is satisfied that the unusual danger no longer exists or is no longer likely to exist,

and the Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety officer, on being satisfied of that, shall without delay notify the worker that the unusual danger no longer exists or is no longer likely to exist, as the case may be.

(7) Pending the investigation and decision by the Committee or the delegate of the Chief Safety Officer under subsections (5) and (6) or pending an appeal under subsection (9), the worker shall remain in a safe place at or near the place of the investigation during his or her normal working hours unless the employer, subject to the provisions of a collective agreement, if any, assigns the worker to temporary alternative work that the worker is competent to perform.

(8) The worker shall be paid at his or her regular rate of pay during the normal working hours the worker spends at the place of the investigation or in the performance of alternative work.

(9) The worker or the employer may appeal a decision of the Committee to the Chief Safety Officer who shall, as soon as is practicable, investigate and decide on the matter.

(10) Despite section 17, the decision of the Chief Safety Officer under subsection (9) is final.

[S.Nu. 2003, c. 25, s. 10; 2013, c. 20, s. 35]

Accueil

Programmes de santé et sécurité au travail

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

Un des éléments essentiels pour assurer la sécurité des travailleurs et améliorer la culture de sécurité d’une organisation (système de responsabilité interne, SRI) est le Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail (SST) et les éléments qui l’animent. Les programmes de SST sont obligatoires pour les employeurs comptant 20 travailleurs ou plus ou lorsque l’employeur est tenu par l’agent de sécurité en chef d’en avoir un. Le succès du Programme de SST repose en grande partie sur l’adhésion des travailleurs. En faisant participer les travailleurs à chaque étape de la création et de la mise en œuvre du Programme de SST, les travailleurs ont l’occasion de fournir une rétroaction précieuse, ce qui améliore l’efficacité du Programme de SST. Le Code de pratique des programmes de santé et de sécurité au travail de la CSTIT contient des détails sur les différentes composantes du programme, un exemple de table des matières de programme de SST et des recommandations sur la conception des éléments sous chaque en-tête. Le Code contient également des formulaires que les employeurs sont encouragés à adapter pour répondre à leurs besoins individuels. On peut également utiliser le formulaire Attention, Commencer, Transformer, Instruire, Observer, Notifier (A.C.T.I.O.N.), pour les incidents où les dangers ont été maîtrisés et où les travailleurs n’ont pas été blessés. Le rapport d’enquête sur les incidents offre suffisamment d’espace pour recueillir des preuves, déterminer les actes dangereux, les conditions dangereuses, les causes indirectes et les causes profondes des incidents.

Un programme de SST est une compilation de politiques et de procédures élaborées dans le but de réduire la fréquence des malaises et des maladies en milieu de travail. Chaque programme de SST est aussi unique que l’établissement ou l’organisation pour lequel il a été créé. Des évaluations formelles à l’entretien préventif, en passant par les inspections informelles, un programme de SST offre à la direction, aux superviseurs et aux travailleurs de multiples possibilités de découvrir et d’aborder les dangers avant qu’un incident ne se produise. Un programme à niveaux multiples est beaucoup plus efficace pour réduire les blessures, car il se fonde sur la présence perpétuelle de dangers; les gens cessent simplement de les chercher.

Un programme de SST doit être présenté par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs et doit comprendre ce qui suit :

  • une déclaration de l’employeur sur la politique de l’établissement en ce qui concerne la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;
  • un programme de reconnaissance des dangers, y compris leur identification, leur évaluation et leur maîtrise;
  • des mesures et des procédures d’urgence, ainsi que l’identification des ressources internes et externes et du personnel pour les interventions d’urgence;
  • un énoncé sur les responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;
  • un calendrier d’inspection pour le chantier, les processus et les procédures;
  • un plan pour le contrôle des substances dangereuses, y compris la façon dont elles sont manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites et éliminées;
  • un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs;
  • les procédures d’enquête pour les refus de travailler;
  • une stratégie visant à faire participer les travailleurs à la santé et à la sécurité au travail; et
  • une procédure pour revoir le Programme de SST au moins une fois aux trois ans, ou lorsque des circonstances nouvelles sont susceptibles d’avoir une incidence sur la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) le Comité ou un représentant;

b) les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé au présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

LOI SUR LA SÉCURITÉ
L.R.T.N.-O. 1988, c. S-1

SANTÉ ET SÉCURITÉ

Section 4 Obligations de l'employeur

4. (1) Chaque employeur :

a) exploite son établissement de telle façon que la santé et la sécurité des personnes qui s'y trouvent ne soient vraisemblablement pas mises en danger;

b) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables et applique des méthodes et techniques raisonnables destinées à protéger la santé et la sécurité des personnes présentes dans son établissement;

c) fournit les services de premiers soins visés par les règlements applicables aux établissements de sa catégorie.

(2) Si deux ou plusieurs employeurs sont responsables d’un établissement, l’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y en a pas, le propriétaire de l’établissement, coordonne les activités des employeurs dans l’établissement pour veiller à la santé et la sécurité des personnes dans l’établissement.

[L.T.N.-O. 2003, c. 25, a. 3]

Section 5 Obligations de l'employé

5. Au travail, le travailleur qui est employé dans un établissement ou au service de celui-ci :

a) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables pour assurer sa sécurité et celle des autres personnes présentes dans l'établissement;

b) au besoin, utilise les dispositifs et porte les vêtements ou accessoires de protection que lui fournit son employeur ou que les règlements l'obligent à utiliser ou à porter.

Section 7 Programme de sécurité

7. L’employeur met en oeuvre et maintient un programme de santé et sécurité au travail pour un lieu de travail conformément aux règlements.

[L.T.N.-O. 2015, c. 30, a. 4.]

Section 13 Définition : «danger exceptionnel»

13. (1) Au présent article, «danger exceptionnel» s'entend, à l'égard d’un travail:

a) soit d'un danger qui n'existe pas normalement dans le cadre de ce travail;

b) soit d'un danger propre à dissuader une personne qui effectue ce travail de travailler en sa présence.

(2) Un travailleur peut refuser de travailler lorsqu'il a des motifs de croire que, selon le cas :

a) un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité existe;

b) l'accomplissement de son travail créera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou pour celle d'autrui;

c) le fait de faire fonctionner un outil, un appareil, une machine, un dispositif ou un objet causera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou celle d'autrui.

(3) Le travailleur qui refuse de travailler fait immédiatement un rapport sur la question à son surveillant ou à son employeur; celui-ci fait alors enquête sans délai et prend les mesures nécessaires à l'élimination du danger exceptionnel en présence du travailleur et d'un représentant syndical ou, s'il n'y a pas de syndicat, d'un autre travailleur choisi par le travailleur en question; cet autre travailleur est libéré et se présente sans délai.

(4) Après enquête et après avoir pris les mesures nécessaires à l'élimination du danger exceptionnel, le surveillant ou l'employeur, selon le cas, avise le travailleur; ce dernier peut toutefois réitérer son refus de travailler s'il a des motifs raisonnables de croire que, selon le cas :

a) un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité existe;

b) l'accomplissement de son travail créera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou pour celle d'autrui;

c) la fait de faire fonctionner un outil, un appareil, une machine, un dispositif ou un objet causera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou celle d'autrui.

L'employeur, le surveillant ou le travailleur avise alors sans délai le comité ou, à défaut de comité, un représentant de l'agent de sécurité en chef de ce refus.

(5) Dans les 24 heures suivant le moment où il est avisé du refus de travailler, le comité ou le représentant de l'agent de sécurité en chef, selon le cas, fait enquête sur les circonstances en présence de l'employeur ou de son représentant et du travailleur; il décide alors si un danger exceptionnel existe ou risque d'exister, selon le cas.

(6) S'il est décidé au titre du paragraphe (5) qu'un danger exceptionnel existe ou risque d'exister, selon le cas, il est interdit d'effectuer le travail en question jusqu'à ce que :

a) l'employeur ait pris les mesures nécessaires pour éliminer le danger exceptionnel;

b) le comité ou le délégué de l'agent de sécurité en chef, selon le cas, soit convaincu que le danger exceptionnel n'existe plus ou ne risque plus d'exister;

le comité ou le délégué avise alors sans délai le travailleur de la nouvelle situation.

(7) En attendant l'enquête du comité ou du représentant de l'agent de sécurité en chef, en vertu du paragraphe (5) ou (6), et jusqu'à ce qu'ils rendent leur décision ou qu'une décision soit rendue sur l'appel interjeté en vertu du paragraphe (9), le travailleur reste dans un endroit sûr, près du lieu de l'enquête durant ses heures normales de travail, sauf si l'employeur, sous réserve de la convention collective, s'il y a lieu, l'affecte temporairement à d'autres tâches qui relèvent de sa compétence.

(8) Le travailleur reçoit son salaire ordinaire durant les heures normales de travail qu'il passe au lieu de l'enquête ou durant lesquelles il effectue les autres tâches qu'on lui assigne.

(9) Le travailleur ou l'employeur peut en appeler de la décision du comité à l'agent de sécurité en chef, lequel fait alors enquête le plus tôt possible et rend une décision sur cette question.

(10) Par dérogation à l'article 17, la décision de l'agent de sécurité en chef visée au paragraphe (9) est définitive.

[L.T.N.-O. 2003, c. 25, a. 9]

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers, des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) d’une part, le comité ou un représentant;

b) d’autre part, les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé en vertu du présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

LOI SUR LA SÉCURITÉ
L.R.T.N.-O. 1988, c. S-1

SANTÉ ET SÉCURITÉ

Article 4 Obligations de l’employeur

4. (1) Chaque employeur :

a) exploite son établissement de telle façon que la santé et la sécurité des personnes qui s’y trouvent ne soient vraisemblablement pas mises en danger;

b) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables et applique des méthodes et techniques raisonnables destinées à protéger la santé et la sécurité des personnes présentes dans son établissement;

c) fournit les services de premiers soins visés par les règlements applicables aux établissements de sa catégorie.

(2) Si plusieurs employeurs sont responsables d’un établissement, l’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y en a pas, le propriétaire de l’établissement, coordonne les activités des employeurs dans l’établissement afin de veiller au respect du paragraphe 4(1).

[L.Nun. 2003, c. 25, a. 4]

Article 5 Obligations de l’employé

5. Au travail, le travailleur qui est employé dans un établissement ou au service de celui-ci :

a) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables pour assurer sa sécurité et celle des autres personnes présentes dans l’établissement;

b) au besoin, utilise les dispositifs et porte les vêtements ou accessoires de protection que lui fournit son employeur ou que les règlements l’obligent à utiliser ou à porter.

Article 7 Programme de sécurité

7. Sur un lieu de travail, l’employeur met en place et gère un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail, conformément aux exigences réglementaires.

[L.Nun. 2015, c. 19, a. 4]

Article 13 Définition de « danger exceptionnel »

13. (1) Au présent article, « danger exceptionnel » s’entend, à l’égard d’un travail :

a) soit d’un danger qui n’existe pas normalement dans le cadre de ce travail;

b) soit d’un danger propre à dissuader une personne qui effectue ce travail, de le faire en sa présence.

(2) Un travailleur peut refuser de travailler lorsqu’il a des motifs de croire que, selon le cas :

a) un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité existe;

b) l’accomplissement de son travail créera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou pour celle d’autrui;

c) le fait de faire fonctionner un outil, un appareil, une machine, un dispositif ou un objet causera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou celle d’autrui.

(3) Le travailleur qui refuse de travailler fait immédiatement un rapport sur la question à son surveillant ou à son employeur; celui-ci fait alors enquête sans délai et prend les mesures nécessaires à l’élimination du danger exceptionnel en présence du travailleur et d’un représentant syndical ou, s’il n’y a pas de syndicat, d’un autre travailleur choisi par le travailleur en question; cet autre travailleur est libéré et se présente sans délai.

(4) Après enquête et après avoir pris les mesures nécessaires à l’élimination du danger exceptionnel, le surveillant ou l’employeur, selon le cas, avise le travailleur; ce dernier peut toutefois réitérer son refus de travailler s’il a des motifs raisonnables de croire que, selon le cas :

a) un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité existe;

b) l’accomplissement de son travail créera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou pour celle d’autrui;

c) le fait de faire fonctionner un outil, un appareil, une machine, un dispositif ou un objet causera vraisemblablement un danger exceptionnel pour sa santé ou sa sécurité, ou celle d’autrui.

L’employeur, le surveillant ou le travailleur avise alors sans délai le comité ou, à défaut de comité, un représentant de l’agent de sécurité en chef de ce refus.

(5) Dans les 24 heures suivant le moment où il est avisé du refus de travailler, le comité ou le représentant de l’agent de sécurité en chef, selon le cas, fait enquête sur les circonstances en présence de l’employeur ou de son représentant et du travailleur; il décide alors si un danger exceptionnel existe ou risque d’exister, selon le cas. Interdiction d’effectuer le travail

(6) S’il est décidé au titre du paragraphe (5) qu’un danger exceptionnel existe ou risque d’exister, selon le cas, il est interdit d’effectuer le travail en question jusqu’à ce que :

a) l’employeur ait pris les mesures nécessaires pour éliminer le danger exceptionnel;

b) le comité ou le délégué de l’agent de sécurité en chef, selon le cas, soit convaincu que le danger exceptionnel n’existe plus ou ne risque plus d’exister;

le comité ou le délégué avise alors sans délai le travailleur de la nouvelle situation.

(7) En attendant l’enquête du comité ou du représentant de l’agent de sécurité en chef, en vertu du paragraphe (5) ou (6), et jusqu’à ce qu’ils rendent leur décision ou qu’une décision soit rendue sur l’appel interjeté en vertu du paragraphe (9), le travailleur reste dans un endroit sûr, près du lieu de l’enquête durant ses heures normales de travail, sauf si l’employeur, sous réserve de la convention collective, s’il y a lieu, l’affecte temporairement à d’autres tâches qui relèvent de sa compétence.

(8) Le travailleur reçoit son salaire ordinaire durant les heures normales de travail qu’il passe au lieu de l’enquête ou durant lesquelles il effectue les autres tâches qu’on lui assigne.

(9) Le travailleur ou l’employeur peut en appeler de la décision du comité à l’agent de sécurité en chef, lequel fait alors enquête le plus tôt possible et rend une décision sur cette question.

(10) Malgré l’article 17, la décision de l’agent de sécurité en chef visée au paragraphe (9) est définitive.

[L.Nun. 2003, c. 25, a. 10; L.Nun. 2013, c. 20, a. 35]