Home

Hearing Protection PPE

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

If workers are at risk for hearing damage in the workplace, regulations require that adequate measures be taken and workers wear hearing protective equipment to protect them from noise hazards. Hearing Personal Protective Equipment (Hearing PPE) is worn by workers when there is a risk their hearing could be exposed to harmful levels of noise. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is permanent, but also preventable. PPE should only be provided when the sources of hazardous levels of noise cannot be eliminated or reduced. See “PPE Basics” for further information on the hierarchy of controls. It is also important to note that PPE can only protect workers when it is appropriate for the conditions and used properly.

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations require workers to use, properly care for, and inspect the PPE. They also require employers to provide PPE at no cost to the individual worker, and provide training to the worker on how to use the PPE properly.

The Hearing PPE Code of Practice provides instructions and information about the applicable regulatory requirements and CSA standards. While the Code and CSA standards cannot anticipate every scenario where hearing PPE is required, the employer must determine the appropriate PPE requirements based on the hazard assessment. The hazard assessment identifies and assesses the exposures so the appropriate hearing protection is selected for use. There are multiple forms of hearing protection, like ear plugs, semi-insert ear plugs, and ear muffs.

Employers must:

  • take reasonable measures to reduce noise levels in working areas;
  • require new work sites be designed to achieve the lowest reasonable noise level;
  • ensure worker areas with noise levels frequently reaching 80 dBA are measured using an approved method by a competent individual and records of the measurements, evaluation and recommendations are kept;
  • determine if significant change occurs to sound levels when performing renovations, introducing new equipment or modifying work processes;
  • maintain and make available results of noise level measurements;
  • clearly mark areas with noise levels exceeding 80 dBA;
  • inform and train workers on noise hazards and appropriate hearing protection;
  • meet additional safety responsibilities including: maintaining a health and safety program, reducing noise levels, involving the committee or representative, and providing audiometric testing should a worker be exposed to noise that exceeds 85 dBA Lex ;
  • develop a hearing conservation plan if the occupational exposure of 20 or more workers’ exceeds 85 dBA Lex. The hearing conservation plan must include methods and procedures, noise control, selection and maintenance of hearing protectors, training, records, audiometric testing requirements, and periodic review of the program; and
  • make the hearing conservation plan accessible to workers.

Workers must:

  • use the PPE provided by the employer;
  • take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the equipment; and
  • return, inform the employer, and refrain from use of any defective equipment.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 8 NOISE CONTROL AND HEARING CONSERVATION

Section 112 General duty

112. (1) An employer shall ensure that, if reasonably possible, measures are taken to reduce noise levels in areas where workers may be required or permitted to work.

(2) The means to reduce noise levels under subsection (1) may include any of the following:

(a) eliminating or modifying the noise source;

(b) substituting quieter equipment or processes;

(c) enclosing the noise source;

(d) installing acoustical barriers or sound absorbing materials.

Section 113 Noise reduction through design and construction of buildings

113. An employer shall ensure that

(a) new work sites are designed and constructed so as to achieve the lowest noise level that is reasonably possible;

(b) any alteration, renovation or repair to an existing work site is made so as to achieve the lowest noise level that is reasonably possible; and

(c) new equipment to be used at a work site is designed and constructed so as to achieve the lowest noise level that is reasonably possible.

Section 114 Measurement of noise levels

114. (1) In an area where a worker is required or permitted to work and the noise level could frequently exceed 80 dBA, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the noise level is measured in accordance with an approved method;

(b) in consultation with the Committee or representative, a competent individual evaluates the sources of the noise and recommends corrective action; and

(c) a record is kept of the measurements, evaluation and recommendations made.

(2) An employer shall measure the noise level in accordance with subsection (1) when any of the following could result in a significant change in noise levels or noise exposure:

(a) altering, renovating or repairing the work site;

(b) introducing new equipment to the work site; or

(c) modifying a process at the work site.

(3) An employer shall keep a record of the results of any noise level measurements conducted at the work site as long as the employer operates in the Northwest Territories.

(4) On request, an employer shall make available to a worker the results of any measurements conducted under this section in respect of that worker.

(5) An employer shall ensure that an area where the measurements taken under subsection (1) show noise levels that exceed 80 dBA, is clearly marked by a sign indicating the range of noise levels.

Section 115 Daily exposure between 80 dBA L and 85 dBA L

115. If a worker is exposed at a work site to noise that is between 80 dBA Lex and 85 dBA Lex, an employer shall

(a) inform the worker of the hazards of noise exposure;

(b) on the request of the worker, make available to the worker approved hearing protectors; and

(c) train the worker in the selection, use and maintenance of the hearing protectors.

Section 116 Daily exposure exceeding 85 dBA L

116. (1) If a worker is exposed at a work site to noise that exceeds 85 dBA Lex, an employer shall

(a) establish and maintain an occupational health and safety program under section 21;

(b) inform the worker of the hazards of occupational noise exposure;

(c) take all reasonably possible steps to reduce noise levels in areas where the worker could be required or permitted to work;

(d) minimize the worker’s noise exposure to the extent that is reasonably possible; and

(e) keep a record of the steps taken under paragraphs (c) and (d).

(2) If, in the opinion of an employer, it is not reasonably possible to reduce noise levels or minimize a worker’s occupational noise exposure to less than 85 dBA Lex, the employer shall provide written reasons for that opinion to the Committee or representative.

(3) If it is not reasonably possible to reduce a worker’s occupational noise exposure below 85 dBA Lex or the noise level below 90 dBA in any area where a worker could be required or permitted to work, an employer shall

(a) provide an approved hearing protector to the worker;

(b) train the worker in the use and maintenance of the hearing protector; and

(c) arrange for the worker to have, not less than once every 24 months during the worker’s normal working hours, an audiometric test and appropriate counselling based on the test results under the direction of a medical professional or qualified audiologist.

(4) If a worker cannot attend an audiometric test referred to in paragraph (3)(c) during the worker’s normal working hours, an employer shall credit the worker’s attendance at the test as time at work and ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or benefits.

(5) If a worker cannot recover his or her costs of an audiometric test referred to in paragraph (3)(c), an employer shall reimburse the worker for the costs of the test that, in the opinion of the Chief Safety Officer, are reasonable.

Section 117 Hearing conservation plan

117. (1) If 20 or more workers’ occupational noise exposure exceeds or is believed to exceed 85 dBA Lex, an employer shall, in consultation with the Committee or representative,

(a) develop a hearing conservation plan; and

(b) review and, as necessary, revise the hearing conservation plan

(2) An employer shall implement a hearing conservation plan developed under subsection (1).

(3) A hearing conservation plan must be in writing and must include

(a) the methods and procedures to be used in assessing the occupational noise exposure of workers;

(b) the methods of noise control to be used, including engineering controls and administrative arrangements;

(c) the selection, use and maintenance of hearing protectors;

(d) a plan to train workers in the hazards of excessive exposure to noise and the correct use of control measures and hearing protectors;

(e) the maintenance of exposure records;

(f) the requirements for audiometric tests; and

(g) a schedule for reviewing the hearing conservation plan and procedures for conducting the review.

(4) An employer shall make a copy of the hearing conservation plan readily available to workers.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 8 NOISE CONTROL AND HEARING CONSERVATION

Section 112 General duty

112. (1) An employer shall ensure that, if reasonably possible, measures are taken to reduce noise levels in areas where workers may be required or permitted to work.

(2) The means to reduce noise levels under subsection (1) may include any of the following:

(a) eliminating or modifying the noise source;

(b) substituting quieter equipment or processes;

(c) enclosing the noise source;

(d) installing acoustical barriers or sound absorbing materials.

Section 113 Noise reduction through design and construction of buildings

113. An employer shall ensure that

(a) new work sites are designed and constructed so as to achieve the lowest noise level that is reasonably possible;

(b) any alteration, renovation or repair to an existing work site is made so as to achieve the lowest noise level that is reasonably possible; and

(c) new equipment to be used at a work site is designed and constructed so as to achieve the lowest noise level that is reasonably possible.

Section 114 Measurement of noise levels

114. (1) In an area where a worker is required or permitted to work and the noise level could frequently exceed 80 dBA, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the noise level is measured in accordance with an approved method;

(b) in consultation with the Committee or representative, a competent individual evaluates the sources of the noise and recommends corrective action; and

(c) a record is kept of the measurements, evaluation and recommendations made.

(2) An employer shall measure the noise level in accordance with subsection (1) when any of the following could result in a significant change in noise levels or noise exposure:

(a) altering, renovating or repairing the work site;

(b) introducing new equipment to the work site; or

(c) modifying a process at the work site.

(3) An employer shall keep a record of the results of any noise level measurements conducted at the work site as long as the employer operates in Nunavut.

(4) On request, an employer shall make available to a worker the results of any measurements conducted under this section in respect of that worker.

(5) An employer shall ensure that an area where the measurements taken under subsection (1) show noise levels that exceed 80 dBA, is clearly marked by a sign indicating the range of noise levels.

Section 115 Daily exposure between 80 dBA L and 85 dBA L

115. If a worker is exposed at a work site to noise that is between 80 dBA Lex and 85 dBA Lex, an employer shall

(a) inform the worker of the hazards of noise exposure;

(b) on the request of the worker, make available to the worker approved hearing protectors; and

(c) train the worker in the selection, use and maintenance of the hearing protectors.

Section 116 Daily exposure exceeding 85 dBA L

116. (1) If a worker is exposed at a work site to noise that exceeds 85 dBA Lex, an employer shall

(a) establish and maintain an occupational health and safety program under section 21;

(b) inform the worker of the hazards of occupational noise exposure;

(c) take all reasonably possible steps to reduce noise levels in areas where the worker could be required or permitted to work;

(d) minimize the worker’s noise exposure to the extent that is reasonably possible; and

(e) keep a record of the steps taken under paragraphs (c) and (d).

(2) If, in the opinion of an employer, it is not reasonably possible to reduce noise levels or minimize a worker’s occupational noise exposure to less than 85 dBA Lex, the employer shall provide written reasons for that opinion to the Committee or representative.

(3) If it is not reasonably possible to reduce a worker’s occupational noise exposure below 85 dBA Lex or the noise level below 90 dBA in any area where a worker could be required or permitted to work, an employer shall

(a) provide an approved hearing protector to the worker;

(b) train the worker in the use and maintenance of the hearing protector; and

(c) arrange for the worker to have, not less than once every 24 months during the worker’s normal working hours, an audiometric test and appropriate counselling based on the test results under the direction of a medical professional or qualified audiologist.

(4) If a worker cannot attend an audiometric test referred to in paragraph (3)(c) during the worker’s normal working hours, an employer shall credit the worker’s attendance at the test as time at work and ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or benefits.

(5) If a worker cannot recover his or her costs of an audiometric test referred to in paragraph (3)(c), an employer shall reimburse the worker for the costs of the test that, in the opinion of the Chief Safety Officer, are reasonable.

Section 117 Hearing conservation plan

117. (1) If 20 or more workers’ occupational noise exposure exceeds or is believed to exceed 85 dBA Lex, an employer shall, in consultation with the Committee or representative,

(a) develop a hearing conservation plan; and

(b) review and, as necessary, revise the hearing conservation plan not less than once every three years.

(2) An employer shall implement a hearing conservation plan developed under subsection (1).

(3) A hearing conservation plan must be in writing and must include

(a) the methods and procedures to be used in assessing the occupational noise exposure of workers;

(b) the methods of noise control to be used, including engineering controls and administrative arrangements;

(c) the selection, use and maintenance of hearing protectors;

(d) a plan to train workers in the hazards of excessive exposure to noise and the correct use of control measures and hearing protectors;

(e) the maintenance of exposure records;

(f) the requirements for audiometric tests; and

(g) a schedule for reviewing the hearing conservation plan and procedures for conducting the review.

(4) An employer shall make a copy of the hearing conservation plan readily available to workers.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Accueil

Protection de l’ouïe

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

Si les travailleurs sont exposés à des risques de dommages auditifs sur le lieu de travail, la réglementation exige que des mesures adéquates soient prises et que les travailleurs portent un équipement de protection de l’ouïe pour les protéger contre les risques de bruit. L’équipement de protection individuelle pour l’ouïe (EPI pour l’ouïe) est porté par les travailleurs lorsqu’il existe un risque que leur ouïe puisse être exposée à des niveaux de bruit dangereux. La perte d’audition due au bruit (PADB) est permanente, mais également évitable. L’EPI ne doit être fourni que lorsque les sources de niveaux de bruit dangereux ne peuvent être éliminées ou réduites. Se reporter à « Rudiments de l’EPI » pour des renseignements plus détaillés sur la hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle. Il est également important de noter que l’EPI ne peut protéger les travailleurs que s’il est approprié aux conditions et utilisé correctement.


Le Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail oblige les travailleurs à utiliser, à bien entretenir et à inspecter l’EPI. Il oblige également les employeurs à fournir l’EPI sans frais à chaque travailleur et à lui donner une formation sur le mode d’emploi de l’EPI.


Le Code de pratique de l’EPI pour l’ouï comprend des instructions et des renseignements sur les exigences réglementaires applicables et les normes de la CSA. Bien que le Code et les normes CSA ne puissent prévoir tous les scénarios où un EPI pour l’ouïe peut être nécessaire, l’employeur doit déterminer les exigences appropriées en matière d’EPI en fonction d’une évaluation des dangers. L’évaluation des dangers identifie et évalue les expositions afin de choisir la protection auditive appropriée. Il existe plusieurs formes de protection auditive, comme des bouchons d’oreilles, des bouchons d’oreilles semi-insérés et des protecteurs d’oreilles.

Les employeurs doivent :

  • prendre des mesures raisonnables pour réduire les niveaux de bruit dans les zones de travail;
  • exiger que les nouveaux chantiers soient conçus de façon à atteindre le niveau sonore le plus bas possible;
  • veiller à ce que les zones de travail dont les niveaux de bruit atteignent fréquemment 80 dBA soient mesurées en utilisant une méthode approuvée par une personne compétente et que les relevés des mesures, l’évaluation et les recommandations soient conservés;
  • déterminer si les niveaux sonores sont modifiés de façon importante lors de rénovations, introduire de nouveaux équipements ou modifier les processus de travail;
  • tenir à jour et rendre disponibles les résultats des mesures du niveau de bruit;
  • marquer clairement les zones dont le niveau de bruit est supérieur à 80 dBA;
  • informer les travailleurs et leur donner une formation sur les dangers dus au bruit et la protection auditive appropriée;
  • s’acquitter de ses responsabilités en matière de sécurité, notamment : tenir à jour un programme de santé et de sécurité, réduire les niveaux de bruit, faire participer le comité ou le représentant et fournir des tests audiométriques si le travailleur est exposé à des bruits supérieurs à 85 dBA Lex
  • élaborer un plan de préservation de l’ouïe si l’exposition professionnelle de 20 travailleurs ou plus dépasse 85 dBA Lex. Le plan de préservation de l’ouïe doit inclure des méthodes et des procédures, le contrôle du bruit, la sélection et l’entretien des protecteurs auditifs, la formation, les dossiers, les exigences en matière de tests audiométriques et l’examen périodique du programme; 
  • rendre le plan de préservation de l’ouïe accessible aux travailleurs. 

Les travailleurs doivent :

  • utiliser l’EPI fourni par l’employeur;
  • prendre des mesures raisonnables pour éviter d’endommager l’équipement;
  • retourner l’EPI et aviser l’employeur de tout équipement défectueux et s’abstenir d’utiliser celui-ci.  Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail des T.N.-O., par.90 (5)]

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 8 LUTTE CONTRE LE BRUIT ET PRÉSERVATION DE L’OUÏE

Section 112 Obligation générale

112. (1) L’employeur s’assure que, s’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, des mesures sont prises pour réduire les niveaux de bruit dans les aires où des travailleurs peuvent être tenus de travailler ou autorisés à travailler.

(2) Les moyens de réduire les niveaux de bruit conformément au paragraphe (1) peuvent comprendre l’une quelconque des mesures suivantes :

a) éliminer ou modifier la source de bruit;

b) remplacer le matériel ou les processus existants par du matériel ou des processus plus silencieux;

c) enfermer la source de bruit;

d) installer des écrans antibruit ou des matériaux absorbant le son.

Section 113 Réduction du bruit par la conception et la construction des immeubles

113. L’employeur s’assure :

a) que les nouveaux lieux de travail sont conçus et construits de manière à obtenir le niveau de bruit le moins élevé qui soit raisonnablement possible;

b) que toute altération, rénovation ou réparation d’un lieu de travail existant est effectuée de manière à obtenir le niveau de bruit le moins élevé qui soit raisonnablement possible;

c) que le nouveau matériel qui doit être utilisé dans un lieu de travail est conçu et construit de manière à obtenir le niveau de bruit le moins élevé qui soit raisonnablement possible.

Section 114 Mesure des niveaux de bruit

114. (1) Dans les aires où un travailleur doit ou peut travailler et où le niveau de bruit pourrait fréquemment dépasser 80 dBA, l’employeur s’assure :

a) que le niveau de bruit est mesuré conformément à une méthode approuvée;

b) que, en collaboration avec le Comité ou un représentant, une personne compétente évalue les sources du bruit et recommande des mesures correctives;

c) qu’un document est tenu sur les mesures effectuées, l’évaluation réalisée et les recommandations présentées.

(2) L’employeur mesure le niveau de bruit conformément au paragraphe (1) lorsque l’une quelconque des mesures suivantes pourrait entraîner une modification importante des niveaux de bruit ou de l’exposition au bruit :

a) la modification, la rénovation ou la réparation du lieu de travail;

b) l’introduction de nouveau matériel dans le lieu de travail;

c) la modification d’un processus dans le lieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur tient un document sur les résultats de toute mesure des niveaux de bruit effectuée dans le lieu de travail aussi longtemps qu’il exerce des activités aux Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

(4) Sur demande, l’employeur met à la disposition d’un travailleur les résultats de toute mesure effectuée conformément au présent article relativement à ce travailleur.

(5) L’employeur s’assure que les aires où les mesures effectuées conformément au paragraphe (1) font état de niveaux de bruit dépassant 80 dBA sont clairement indiquées par une enseigne indiquant la gamme des niveaux de bruit.

Section 115 Exposition quotidienne entre 80 dBA Lex et 85 dBA Lex

115. Si un travailleur est exposé, dans un lieu de travail, à du bruit dont le niveau se situe entre 80 dBA Lex et 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur :

a) informe le travailleur des dangers de l’exposition au bruit;

b) à la demande du travailleur, met à sa disposition des protecteurs auriculaires approuvés;

c) forme le travailleur quant à la sélection, l’utilisation et l’entretien des protecteurs auriculaires.

Section 116 Exposition quotidienne dépassant 85 dBA Lex

116. (1) Si un travailleur est exposé, dans un lieu de travail, à du bruit dont le niveau dépasse 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur :

a) établit et maintient un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément à l’article 21;

b) informe le travailleur des dangers de l’exposition au bruit industriel;

c) prend toutes les mesures raisonnablement possibles pour réduire les niveaux de bruit dans les aires où le travailleur pourrait être tenu de travailler ou autorisé à travailler;

d) réduit au minimum l’exposition au bruit du travailleur, dans la mesure où cela est raisonnablement possible;

e) tient un document sur les mesures prises conformément aux alinéas c) et d).

(2) Si, de l’avis de l’employeur, il n’est pas raisonnablement possible de ramener au minimum les niveaux de bruit ou de ramener l’exposition au bruit industriel d’un travailleur à moins de 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur fournit par écrit au Comité ou à un représentant les motifs de son avis.

(3) S’il n’est pas raisonnablement possible de ramener l’exposition au bruit industriel d’un travailleur à moins de 85 dBA Lex ou le niveau de bruit à moins de 90 dBA dans toute aire où un travailleur pourrait être tenu de travailler ou autorisé à travailler, l’employeur :

a) fournit au travailleur un protecteur auriculaire approuvé;

b) forme le travailleur quant à l’utilisation et l’entretien du protecteur auriculaire;

c) fait en sorte que le travailleur, au moins une fois tous les 24 mois, pendant les heures normales de travail du travailleur, se soumette à un examen audiométrique et reçoive des conseils appropriés fondés sur les résultats de l’examen, sous la direction d’un professionnel de la santé ou d’un audiologiste compétent.

(4) Si le travailleur ne peut se présenter à l’examen audiométrique visé à l’alinéa (3)c) pendant ses heures normales de travail, l’employeur considère comme temps de travail le temps que prend le travailleur pour se soumettre à l’examen, et veille à ce que ce dernier ne perde aucun salaire ni avantage.

(5) Si le travailleur ne peut recouvrer les coûts qu’il a engagés relativement à l’examen audiométrique visé à l’alinéa (3)c), l’employeur lui rembourse les coûts de l’examen qui, de l’avis de l’agent de sécurité en chef, sont raisonnables.

Section 117 Plan de préservation de l’ouïe

117. (1) Si l’exposition au bruit industriel d’au moins 20 travailleurs dépasse ou est considérée comme dépassant 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur, en collaboration avec le Comité ou un représentant :

a) élabore un plan de préservation de l’ouïe;

b) examine et, au besoin, révise le plan de préservation de l’ouïe au moins une fois tous les trois ans.

(2) L’employeur met en œuvre le plan de préservation de l’ouïe élaboré conformément au paragraphe (1).

(3) Le plan de préservation de l’ouïe doit être écrit et comprendre des renseignements sur ce qui suit :

a) les méthodes et procédures qui doivent être suivies pour évaluer l’exposition au bruit industriel des travailleurs;

b) les méthodes de contrôle du bruit qui doivent être utilisées, y compris les mesures d’ingénierie et les dispositions administratives;

c) la sélection, l’utilisation et l’entretien des protecteurs auriculaires;

d) un plan pour former les travailleurs en ce qui concerne les dangers d’une exposition excessive au bruit et l’utilisation convenable des mesures de contrôle et des protecteurs auriculaires;

e) la tenue des documents sur l’exposition;

f) les exigences relatives aux examens audiométriques;

g) un calendrier d’examen du plan de préservation de l’ouïe, ainsi que les procédures d’examen.

(4) L’employeur fait en sorte que les travailleurs aient facilement accès à une copie du plan de préservation de l’ouïe.

Part 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Section 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ni d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur de la défectuosité ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 8 LUTTE CONTRE LE BRUIT ET PRÉSERVATION DE L'OUÏE

Article 112 Obligation générale

112. (1) L’employeur s’assure que, s’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, des mesures sont prises pour réduire les niveaux de bruit dans les aires où des travailleurs peuvent être obligés ou autorisés à travailler.

(2) Les moyens de réduire les niveaux de bruit conformément au paragraphe (1) peuvent comprendre l’une quelconque des mesures suivantes :

a) éliminer ou modifier la source de bruit;

b) remplacer l’équipement ou les processus existants par de l’équipement ou des processus plus silencieux;

c) enfermer la source de bruit;

d) installer des écrans antibruit ou des matériaux absorbant le son.

Article 113 Réduction du bruit par la conception et la construction des immeubles

113. L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) les nouveaux lieux de travail sont conçus et construits de manière à obtenir le niveau de bruit le moins élevé qui soit raisonnablement possible;

b) toute modification, rénovation ou réparation d’un lieu de travail existant est effectuée de manière à obtenir le niveau de bruit le moins élevé qui soit raisonnablement possible;

c) le nouvel équipement qui doit être utilisé dans un lieu de travail est conçu et construit de manière à obtenir le niveau de bruit le moins élevé qui soit raisonnablement possible.

Article 114 Mesure des niveaux de bruit

114. (1) Dans les aires où un travailleur est obligé ou autorisé à travailler et où le niveau de bruit pourrait fréquemment dépasser 80 dBA, l’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) le niveau de bruit est mesuré conformément à une méthode approuvée;

b) en consultation avec le comité ou un représentant, une personne compétente évalue les sources du bruit et recommande des mesures correctives;

c) un dossier des mesures effectuées, de l’évaluation réalisée et des recommandations présentées est tenu.

(2) L’employeur mesure le niveau de bruit conformément au paragraphe (1) lorsque l’une quelconque des mesures suivantes pourrait entraîner une modification importante des niveaux de bruit ou de l’exposition au bruit :

a) la modification, la rénovation ou la réparation du lieu de travail;

b) l’introduction de nouvel équipement dans le lieu de travail;

c) la modification d’un processus dans le lieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur tient un dossier des résultats de toute mesure des niveaux de bruit effectuée dans le lieu de travail aussi longtemps qu’il exerce des activités au Nunavut.

(4) Sur demande, l’employeur met à la disposition d’un travailleur les résultats de toute mesure effectuée conformément au présent article relativement à ce travailleur.

(5) L’employeur s’assure que les aires où les mesures effectuées conformément au paragraphe (1) font état de niveaux de bruit dépassant 80 dBA sont clairement indiquées par une enseigne indiquant la gamme des niveaux de bruit.

Article 115 Exposition quotidienne entre 80 dBA Lex et 85 dBA Lex

115. Si un travailleur est exposé, dans un lieu de travail, à du bruit dont le niveau se situe entre 80 dBA Lex et 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur :

a) informe le travailleur des dangers de l’exposition au bruit;

b) à la demande du travailleur, met à sa disposition des protecteurs auriculaires approuvés;

c) forme le travailleur quant à la sélection, à l’utilisation et à l’entretien des protecteurs auriculaires.

Article 116 Exposition quotidienne dépassant 85 dBA Lex

116. (1) Si un travailleur est exposé, dans un lieu de travail, à du bruit dont le niveau dépasse 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur :

a) établit et maintient un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément à l’article 21;

b) informe le travailleur des dangers de l’exposition au bruit industriel;

c) prend toutes les mesures raisonnablement possibles pour réduire les niveaux de bruit dans les aires où le travailleur pourrait être obligé ou autorisé à travailler;

d) réduit au minimum l’exposition au bruit du travailleur, dans la mesure où cela est raisonnablement possible;

e) tient un dossier des mesures prises conformément aux alinéas c) et d).

(2) Si, de l’avis de l’employeur, il n’est pas raisonnablement possible de réduire les niveaux de bruit ou de ramener l’exposition au bruit industriel d’un travailleur à moins de 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur fournit par écrit au comité ou à un représentant les motifs de son avis.

(3) S’il n’est pas raisonnablement possible de ramener l’exposition au bruit industriel d’un travailleur à moins de 85 dBA Lex ou le niveau de bruit à moins de 90 dBA dans toute aire où un travailleur pourrait être obligé ou autorisé à travailler, l’employeur :

a) fournit au travailleur un protecteur auriculaire approuvé;

b) forme le travailleur quant à l’utilisation et à l’entretien du protecteur auriculaire;

c) fait en sorte que le travailleur, au moins une fois tous les 24 mois, pendant les heures normales de travail du travailleur, se soumette à un examen audiométrique et reçoive des conseils appropriés fondés sur les résultats de l’examen, sous la direction d’un professionnel de la santé ou d’un audiologiste qualifié.

(4) Si le travailleur ne peut se présenter à l’examen audiométrique visé à l’alinéa (3)c) pendant ses heures normales de travail, l’employeur considère comme temps de travail le temps que prend le travailleur pour se soumettre à l’examen, et veille à ce que ce dernier ne perde aucun salaire ni avantage.

(5) Si le travailleur ne peut recouvrer les coûts qu’il a engagés relativement à l’examen audiométrique visé à l’alinéa (3)c), l’employeur lui rembourse les coûts de l’examen qui, de l’avis de l’agent de sécurité en chef, sont raisonnables.

Article 117 Plan de préservation de l’ouïe

117. (1) Si l’exposition au bruit industriel d’au moins 20 travailleurs dépasse ou est considérée comme dépassant 85 dBA Lex, l’employeur, en consultation avec le comité ou un représentant :

a) élabore un plan de préservation de l’ouïe;

b) examine et, au besoin, révise le plan de préservation de l’ouïe au moins une fois tous les trois ans.

(2) L’employeur met en oeuvre le plan de préservation de l’ouïe élaboré conformément au paragraphe (1).

(3) Le plan de préservation de l’ouïe doit être écrit et comprendre des renseignements sur ce qui suit :

a) les méthodes et procédures qui doivent être suivies pour évaluer l’exposition au bruit industriel des travailleurs;

b) les méthodes de contrôle du bruit qui doivent être utilisées, y compris les mesures d’ingénierie et les dispositions administratives;

c) la sélection, l’utilisation et l’entretien des protecteurs auriculaires;

d) un plan pour former les travailleurs en ce qui concerne les dangers d’une exposition excessive au bruit et l’utilisation convenable des mesures de contrôle et des protecteurs auriculaires;

e) la tenue des dossiers sur l’exposition;

f) les exigences relatives aux examens audiométriques;

g) un calendrier d’examen du plan de préservation de l’ouïe, ainsi que les procédures d’examen.

(4) L’employeur rend une copie du plan de préservation de l’ouïe facilement accessible aux travailleurs.

Partie 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Article 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) d’une part, sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) d’autre part, a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur du défaut ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).