Home

Hazard Assessments

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

An essential part of an organization’s safety culture and safety management system is the use of hazard assessments to identify, assess, and control workplace hazards.

Taking steps to uncover and address hazards before an incident occurs means employers are able to minimize the likelihood of workers being injured, equipment getting damaged, or the environment being negatively impacted.

Workers must be informed of the hazards they may encounter and the steps they need to take to eliminate or control those hazards.

There are two types of hazard assessments discussed in detail in the Hazard Assessment Code of Practice:

  • Formal hazard assessments
  • Site-specific hazard assessments

What is a formal hazard assessment?

Formal hazard assessments take a close look at the individual tasks within each position of the organization. A team of assessors, made up of workers and led by a manager or supervisor, complete the assessment. The steps for the formal hazard assessment process are:

  • Positions – List what jobs are performed by workers in the organization. For example: car mechanic, driver, packer, etc. A position can include one or more workers. The company organizational chart is a good place to start when trying to identify the positions requiring assessment.
  • Tasks – List the tasks performed by workers in the same positions. Tasks are not to be confused with task steps (sequence of steps which make up a task). Tasks are the specific jobs a position performs. An example is a car mechanic changing the oil, repairing a fuel line, or replacing the brakes on a car.
  • Hazards – The assessment team identifies existing or possible hazards of each task by breaking down the task in sequential steps and listing things that could go wrong.   Each hazard can be classified into one of the following categories: physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial.
  • Risks – Once the hazards are identified, the assessment team calculates the risk the hazard poses to the worker, equipment (organization), and the environment.  Calculation of risk takes into account the frequency, the severity, and the likelihood, of an incident occurring due to a hazard. The higher the risk, the higher is the urgency to fix the issue. The risk determines the order of priority in which the hazards must be dealt with (priority rating).
  • Control – Assessors must eliminate hazards whenever possible. When that cannot be accomplished, steps are taken to minimize the risk. The hierarchy for controlling hazards is: Elimination, Substitution, Engineering, Administration, and Personal Protective Equipment (as a last resort). When considering a control measure the assessors must anticipate any potential hazard that the new control may bring, and determine how it can be controlled.
  • Implement – Put the controls into place and notify workers. Communicate, document, manage, and ensure the control properly fits the needs of that particular work site.
  • Check-up – Make sure the controls are still a good fit, as things sometimes change: environment, staff turn-over, position responsibilities, etc. Revisit the possibility of eliminating the hazard altogether.
  • Living Documents – The formal hazard assessment is a living document and can change as things within the organization change. It must be updated and maintained. Make sure that someone is accountable for regularly reviewing the assessments.

What is a site-specific hazard assessment?

The site-specific hazard assessments evaluate the hazards specific to a worksite at times new hazards may be introduced.  Also called field level assessments, they are completed before the shift. Any hazard findings or concerns are addressed immediately. The selected controls are put into place, and the workers are educated in how to address the hazard before work begins.

A site-specific hazard assessment is a living document, just like a formal hazard assessment. When the work site changes, so does the assessment. Site specific assessments must be completed:

  • at the beginning of the shift, before work starts on a new site;
  • before a new project begins;
  • before equipment or materials arrive at the site for the first time;
  • if tasks or activities change;
  • before starting seasonal work, or work that isn’t normally done at the site;
  • if new hazards are identified;
  • if there are changes in the site environment, such as weather; and
  • when new positions are created or new contractors arrive at the site.

Site-specific hazard assessments are conducted in a similar way to formal hazard assessments with one big exception: since all hazards found in a site-specific assessment must be controlled prior to work commencing, there is no need to assess the level of risk to determine priority for implementing hazard controls. Organizations can use their own legend to allow supervisors and workers to quickly make decisions adequate for the hazard. An example of a legend is below:

  1. Severe: STOP AND DISCUSS:  Do not continue the task. Before continuing, contact the supervisor/worker to discuss how to control the hazard.
  2. High: STOP AND ASSESS: Consider if the hazard can be eliminated, or if the task can be done in a different way. Could the hazardous part of the task be postponed or not completed at all?
  3. Moderate: PAUSE WORK: Is there anything that could be done to minimize the risk? Put in place alternative control(s) and reassess to see if the hazards have been reduced.
  4. Low: CONTINUE CAUTIOUSLY: Make sure current controls are working (no one has removed the hand grinder guard, etc.). Be aware that new hazards can develop as work progresses. Reassess as needed.

Findings from site-specific hazard assessments can be used to update formal hazard assessment documents.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General duties of employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Section 21 Occupational health and safety Program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

SAFETY ACT
R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. S-1

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 4 Duty of employer

4. (1) Every employer shall

(a) maintain his or her establishment in such a manner that the health and safety of persons in the establishment are not likely to be endangered;

(b) take all reasonable precautions and adopt and carry out all reasonable techniques and procedures to ensure the health and safety of every person in his or her establishment; and

(c) provide the first aid service requirements set out in the regulations pertaining to his or her class of establishment.

(2) If two or more employers have charge of an establishment, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner of the establishment, shall coordinate the activities of the employers in the establishment to ensure the health and safety of persons in the establishment.

[S.N.W.T. 2003, c. 25, s. 3]

Section 5 Duty of worker

5. Every worker employed on or in connection with an establishment shall, in the course of his or her employment,

(a) take all reasonable precautions to ensure his or her own safety and the safety of other persons in the establishment; and

(b) as the circumstances require, use devices and articles of clothing or equipment that are intended for his or her protection and provided to the worker by his or her employer, or required pursuant to the regulations to be used or worn by the worker.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General Duties of Employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Section 21 Occupational health and safety program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

SAFETY ACT
R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. S-1

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 4 Duty of employer

4. (1) Every employer shall

(a) maintain his or her establishment in such a manner that the health and safety of persons in the establishment are not likely to be endangered;

(b) take all reasonable precautions and adopt and carry out all reasonable techniques and procedures to ensure the health and safety of every person in his or her establishment; and

(c) provide the first aid service requirements set out in the regulations pertaining to his or her class of establishment.

(2) If two or more employers have charge of an establishment, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner of the establishment, shall coordinate the activities of the employers in the establishment to ensure compliance with subsection 4(1).

[S.Nu. 2003, c. 25, s. 4]

Section 5 Duty of worker

5. Every worker employed on or in connection with an establishment shall, in the course of his or her employment,

(a) take all reasonable precautions to ensure his or her own safety and the safety of other persons in the establishment; and

(b) as the circumstances require, use devices and articles of clothing or equipment that are intended for his or her protection and provided to the worker by his or her employer, or required pursuant to the regulations to be used or worn by the worker.

Accueil

Évaluation des dangers

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

Dans une organisation, l’évaluation des dangers est un élément fondamental de la culture axée sur la sécurité et du système de gestion de la sécurité aux fins de l’identification, de l’évaluation et du contrôle des dangers en milieu de travail.

Le fait de prendre des mesures pour cerner les dangers et tenter de les éliminer, et ce, avant qu’un incident se produise, signifie que les employeurs sont en mesure de réduire la probabilité que les travailleurs subissent un préjudice, que l’équipement soit endommagé ou qu’il y ait des effets négatifs sur l’environnement.

Les travailleurs doivent connaître les dangers auxquels ils peuvent être exposés et les mesures à prendre pour contrôler ou éliminer ces dangers.

Le Code de pratique sur l’évaluation des risques expose en détail deux types d’évaluation des dangers :

  • Les évaluations officielles des dangers
  • Les évaluations des dangers propres au lieu de travail

Qu’est-ce qu’une évaluation officielle des dangers?

Une évaluation officielle des dangers consiste en un examen approfondi des fonctions liées à chaque poste au sein de l’organisation. Une équipe d’évaluateurs, constituée de travailleurs et dirigée par un gestionnaire ou un superviseur, procède à l’évaluation. Les étapes de l’évaluation officielle des dangers sont les suivantes :

  • Postes – Dresser la liste des postes occupés par les travailleurs de l’organisation, par exemple : mécanicien automobile, chauffeur, emballeur. Un poste peut comprendre un ou plusieurs travailleurs. La structure organisationnelle de l’entreprise est un bon point de départ pour déterminer les postes qui requièrent une évaluation.
  • Tâches – Dresser la liste des tâches exécutées par les travailleurs qui occupent les mêmes postes. On ne doit pas confondre les tâches et les étapes nécessaires pour les exécuter (à savoir la séquence des étapes qui composent une tâche). Les tâches sont les fonctions propres à un poste. Par exemple, un mécanicien automobile vidange l’huile, répare les conduites de carburant ou remplace les freins d’une voiture.
  • Dangers – L’équipe d’évaluation identifie les dangers réels ou potentiels associés à chaque tâche, en décomposant la tâche en étapes séquentielles et en établissant la liste de tout ce qui pourrait mal tourner. Chaque danger peut être classé comme un danger pour la santé ou la sécurité, selon quatre catégories : physique, chimique, biologique et psychologique.
  • Risques – Une fois les dangers identifiés, l’équipe d’évaluation calcule le risque qu’ils posent pour le travailleur, l’équipement (organisation) et l’environnement. Pour ce faire, elle prend en considération la fréquence, la gravité et la probabilité qu’un incident découle du danger. Plus le risque est élevé, plus l’urgence de régler le problème est grande. Le risque détermine l’ordre de priorité selon lequel les dangers seront traités (classement prioritaire).
  • Contrôle – Les évaluateurs doivent éliminer les dangers dans la mesure du possible. Lorsque cela est impossible, des mesures sont prises pour atténuer le risque. Ces mesures de contrôle suivent un ordre hiérarchique : élimination, substitution, mesures d’ingénierie, mesures administratives, équipement de protection individuelle (en dernier ressort). Avant de mettre en œuvre une nouvelle mesure de contrôle, les évaluateurs doivent prévoir tout nouveau danger que celle-ci pourrait entraîner et déterminer comment contrôler le nouveau danger.
  • Mise en œuvre – Mettre en œuvre les mesures de contrôle et en informer les travailleurs. Communiquer, consigner et gérer les mesures, et s’assurer qu’elles répondent adéquatement aux besoins du lieu de travail où elles ont été mises en œuvre.
  • Vérification – S’assurer que les mesures de contrôle sont toujours appropriées, au fur et à mesure que les choses évoluent : l’environnement, le roulement de personnel, les responsabilités inhérentes au poste, etc. Revoir la possibilité d’éliminer complètement le danger.
  • Documents en évolution – L’évaluation officielle des dangers est assortie de documents en évolution qui sont adaptés au fur et à mesure que des changements surviennent au sein de l’organisation. Ces documents doivent être mis à jour et conservés. S’assurer qu’une personne est chargée de réviser régulièrement les évaluations.

Qu’est-ce qu’une évaluation des dangers propres au lieu de travail?

Une évaluation des dangers propres au lieu de travail est menée lorsque de nouveaux dangers sont susceptibles de se présenter sur le lieu de travail. Aussi connue sous le nom d’« évaluation des dangers sur le terrain », elle est effectuée avant le début du quart de travail. Tout danger constaté ou préoccupation relative à un danger potentiel est traité immédiatement. Des mesures de contrôle spécifiques sont mises en place, et on informe les travailleurs de la façon de gérer le danger avant le début du travail.

L’évaluation des dangers propres au lieu de travail est assortie de documents en évolution, comme l’évaluation officielle des dangers. Lorsque les conditions du lieu de travail changent, l’évaluation s’ajuste. Les évaluations des dangers propres au lieu de travail doivent être effectuées :

  • au début du quart de travail, lors de l’amorce des travaux sur un nouveau lieu de travail;
  • avant le début d’un nouveau projet;
  • avant que l’équipement ou les matériaux arrivent sur le lieu de travail pour la première fois;
  • si les tâches ou les activités changent;
  • avant de commencer un travail saisonnier ou des travaux qui ne sont généralement pas effectués sur les lieux;
  • si de nouveaux dangers sont identifiés;
  • si des changements sont constatés dans l’environnement du lieu de travail, comme les conditions météorologiques;
  • lors de la création de nouveaux postes ou de l’arrivée de nouveaux entrepreneurs sur le lieu de travail.

Les évaluations des dangers propres au lieu de travail sont menées de la même manière que les évaluations officielles des dangers, à une exception près : comme tous les dangers constatés doivent être contrôlés avant le début des travaux, il n’y a pas lieu de déterminer le niveau de risque pour établir l’ordre de priorité des mesures de contrôle qui seront mises en œuvre. Les organisations doivent utiliser leur propre matrice afin de permettre aux superviseurs et aux travailleurs de prendre rapidement les décisions appropriées relativement au danger. En voici un exemple :

  1. Grave : ARRÊTEZ ET DISCUTEZ : Ne poursuivez pas votre tâche. Avant de continuer, communiquez avec le superviseur/travailleur pour discuter de la manière de contrôler le danger.
  2. Élevé : ARRÊTEZ ET ÉVALUEZ : Voyez si le danger peut être éliminé ou si la tâche peut être effectuée différemment. La portion du travail qui comporte un danger peut-elle être retardée ou ne pas être réalisée?
  3. Modéré : INTERROMPEZ LE TRAVAIL : Est-ce que quelque chose pourrait réduire le risque? Mettez en place des mesures de contrôle subsidiaires et procédez à une réévaluation pour déterminer si les dangers peuvent être atténués.
  4. Faible : CONTINUEZ PRUDEMMENT : Assurez-vous que les mesures de contrôle fonctionnent adéquatement (personne n’a retiré le dispositif de protection des mains, etc.). Sachez que de nouveaux dangers peuvent apparaître au fur et à mesure que progressent les travaux. Réévaluez la situation au besoin.

Les résultats des évaluations des dangers propres au lieu de travail peuvent servir à la mise à jour des documents découlant des évaluations officielles des dangers.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure du possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Section 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, le matériel de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou mises en place conformément au présent règlement.

Section 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) le Comité ou un représentant;

b) les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé au présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

LOI SUR LA SÉCURITÉ
L.R.T.N.-O. 1988, c. S-1

SANTÉ ET SÉCURITÉ

Section 4 Obligations de l'employeur

4. (1) Chaque employeur :

a) exploite son établissement de telle façon que la santé et la sécurité des personnes qui s'y trouvent ne soient vraisemblablement pas mises en danger;

b) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables et applique des méthodes et techniques raisonnables destinées à protéger la santé et la sécurité des personnes présentes dans son établissement;

c) fournit les services de premiers soins visés par les règlements applicables aux établissements de sa catégorie.

(2) Si deux ou plusieurs employeurs sont responsables d’un établissement, l’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y en a pas, le propriétaire de l’établissement, coordonne les activités des employeurs dans l’établissement pour veiller à la santé et la sécurité des personnes dans l’établissement.

[L.T.N.-O. 2003, c. 25, a. 3]

Section 5 Obligations de l'employé

5. Au travail, le travailleur qui est employé dans un établissement ou au service de celui-ci :

a) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables pour assurer sa sécurité et celle des autres personnes présentes dans l'établissement;

b) au besoin, utilise les dispositifs et porte les vêtements ou accessoires de protection que lui fournit son employeur ou que les règlements l'obligent à utiliser ou à porter.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure de ce qui est raisonnablement possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Article 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, l’équipement de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou élaborées conformément au présent règlement.

Article 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers, des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) d’une part, le comité ou un représentant;

b) d’autre part, les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé en vertu du présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

LOI SUR LA SÉCURITÉ
L.R.T.N.-O. 1988, c. S-1

SANTÉ ET SÉCURITÉ

Article 4 Obligations de l’employeur

4. (1) Chaque employeur :

a) exploite son établissement de telle façon que la santé et la sécurité des personnes qui s’y trouvent ne soient vraisemblablement pas mises en danger;

b) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables et applique des méthodes et techniques raisonnables destinées à protéger la santé et la sécurité des personnes présentes dans son établissement;

c) fournit les services de premiers soins visés par les règlements applicables aux établissements de sa catégorie.

(2) Si plusieurs employeurs sont responsables d’un établissement, l’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y en a pas, le propriétaire de l’établissement, coordonne les activités des employeurs dans l’établissement afin de veiller au respect du paragraphe 4(1).

[L.Nun. 2003, c. 25, a. 4]

Article 5 Obligations de l’employé

5. Au travail, le travailleur qui est employé dans un établissement ou au service de celui-ci :

a) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables pour assurer sa sécurité et celle des autres personnes présentes dans l’établissement;

b) au besoin, utilise les dispositifs et porte les vêtements ou accessoires de protection que lui fournit son employeur ou que les règlements l’obligent à utiliser ou à porter.