Home

Camp Set Up and Management - Industrial

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

When workplace operations take place in remote areas, employers will be setting up work or field camps. Field camps are regulated as "isolated work sites" in the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and as "isolated camps" in the Mine Health and Safety Regulations.  As workers may be working in isolation and / or at remote sites they will be exposed to additional hazards than workers at regular workplaces. Depending on the location of the camp, the hazards may vary.

Employers who have industrial field camps but are not regulated under the Mine Health and Safety Act, must meet all of the health and safety requirements for industrial workplaces plus requirements that are specific to the camp site. The additional health and safety requirements are addressed in detail in the WSCC Camp Set Up and Management Code of Practice. This code of practice outlines the various regulatory requirements for field camps, the possible hazards and risks that could exist at the camp sites, and how to control such hazards and risks. The employers of camps should consider implementing this code of practice as a proper camp set-up promotes a safe and healthy environment for workers.

Regardless of size, all employers are required to eliminate or reduce the risks as identified through their hazard assessments with appropriate controls. Employers with 20 or more workers are required to mitigate hazards as part of their campsite’s occupational health and safety (OHS) program. If an employer is not required to have an occupational health and safety program (less than 20 workers and not directed to have one by the Chief Safety Officer) , for due diligence reasons, it is recommended that the employer still prepare one. An OHS program can help the employer to identify the many unique hazards and challenges that could be encountered at remote / isolated field camps.

Before employers set up a field camp site they need to prepare an operational plan that considers the following health-related factors:

  • location of the site
  • camp size
  • arrangement of camp facilities (including sleeping accommodations)
  • provisions of safe drinking water and hygienic food storage
  • location and construction of sewage facilities
  • waste management

Due to the unique hazards that exist at field camps, the additional elements that may need to be addressed in the camp’s occupational health and safety (OHS) program are:

  • firearm regulations, policies, and safe practices
  • wildlife policies and practices
  • alcohol and drug policies
  • survival training
  • navigational or directional equipment
  • remote travel
  • fire safety and prevention
  • fuels (e.g. gasoline, diesel, propane, etc.)
  • hazardous materials (e.g. compressed gases)
  • generators and other electrical equipment (including lock out procedures)
  • batteries
  • heating stoves and camp appliances
  • camp equipment
  • sources of carbon monoxide
  • worker hygiene
  • food and water safety
  • communication equipment
  • camp inspections
  • emergency first aid planning
  • waste management, and
  • material handling

Employers of industrial camps must:

  • prepare an occupational health and safety (OHS) program when they have 20 or more workers. The OHS program must include safe practices and procedures for the camp site-specific hazards. Some of these hazards are listed further below under the section regarding employers and due diligence.
  • have procedures for first aid; comply with first aid requirements;
  • provide the best communication equipment for the geographic location and terrain; supply the camp with sufficient equipment, including an independent backup system; post operating instructions for all communication equipment for easy access in an emergency. At remote sites cell phones may not be an appropriate way for workers to communicate, especially field workers who may be working alone
  • develop fire safety procedures specific for the campsite;
  • ensure there is appropriate-sized fire extinguisher(s) in the campsite kitchen, as determined by the hazard assessment.

Employers of industrial camps, for due diligence reasons , should:

  • have an occupational health and safety program when they have less than 20 workers;
  • ensure water resources at established camps are compliant with the requirements of the water board of that region (there are five water boards in the NT and one in NU);
  • ensure the camp design and layout meet the additional fire, health, safety, and environment regulations;
  • arrange for emergency assistance and transportation; consider scenarios, such as poor weather conditions, which may delay emergency response;
  • ensure that means of communication with all worksites operated from an isolated camp are available at all times before an isolated field camp is set up;
  • determine whether or not a wildlife monitor is needed;
  • develop a policy and safe practices for interaction with wildlife; instruct workers not to feed wildlife. Consult with the Department of the Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) regarding wildlife regulations for interaction and recommended safety practices for the territory. Employers must educate their workers on hazards, including animal attacks, and how to control that hazard.
  • develop a policy and safe practices for firearms safe use, maintenance, and storage for all firearms at camp;
  • ensure a qualified person educates and trains workers on the site-specific hazards and control measures. Training must include information on wildlife hazards, survival techniques, and use of special equipment such as navigational or directional equipment to avoid becoming lost, communication equipment, boats, use of protective equipment, etc.
  • have an emergency shelter for camps with interconnected structures which will not be affected by a fire at the main structure. Emergency shelters need to be equipped with a heater, first aid kit as per Schedule I in the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, fuel supply, communication equipment, and other equipment such as flares that can be used for rescue purposes.
  • develop a procedure for handling equipment and materials when using aircraft;
  • develop a procedure for emergency scenarios and survival equipment;

Workers at isolated industrial camps must:

  • comply with employer's instructions, safe operating procedures and safe practices;
  • use, maintain, and store devices, personal protective equipment and or equipment as instructed by the employer;
  • not feed wildlife;
  • only use firearms as per employer's safe practices;
  • comply with the workplace drug and alcohol policy;
  • not pollute the surrounding environment; use the employer provided hygiene facilities; comply with workplace waste procedures and hygiene procedures and practices.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General duties of employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Section 14 Young persons

14. (1) An employer shall ensure that an individual under 16 years of age is not required or permitted to work

(a) on a construction site;

(b) in a production process at a pulp mill, saw mill or woodworking establishment;

(c) in a production process at a smelter, foundry, refinery or metal processing or fabricating operation;

(d) in a confined space;

(e) in a forestry or logging operation;

(f) as an operator of powered mobile equipment, a crane or a hoist;

(g) where exposure to a chemical or biological substance is likely to endanger the health or safety of the individual; or

(h) in power line construction or maintenance

(2) An employer shall ensure that an individual under 18 years of age is not required or permitted to work

(a) as an occupational worker as defined in section 339;

(b) in an asbestos process as defined in section 364;

(c) in a silica process as defined in section 380; or

(d) in an activity requiring the use of an atmosphere-supplying respirator.

Section 15 Duty of principal contractor to inform

15. The principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, an employer, shall give notice in writing to each other employer and worker at a work site, setting out

(a) the name of the individual who is supervising the work on behalf of the principal contractor or employer;

(b) emergency facilities available for use by workers;

(c) if a Committee is established under section 37, the existence of the Committee at the work site and the means to contact the Committee; and

(d) if a representative is designated under section 39, the identity of the representative at the work site and the means to contact him or her.

Section 16 Supervision of work

16. (1) An employer shall ensure that, at a work site,

(a) work is sufficiently and competently supervised;

(b) supervisors have sufficient knowledge of the following:

(i) any occupational health and safety program applicable to workers supervised at the work site,

(ii) the safe handling, use, storage, production and disposal of hazardous substances,

(iii) the need for, and safe use of, personal protective equipment,

(iv) emergency procedures required by these regulations,

(v) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of workers;

(c) supervisors have completed an approved regulatory familiarization program; and

(d) supervisors comply with the Act and these regulations.

(2) A supervisor shall ensure that workers comply with the Act and these regulations as they apply to the work site.

Section 17 Duty to inform workers

17. An employer shall ensure that workers

(a) are informed of the provisions of the Act and these regulations as they apply to the work site; and

(b) comply with the Act and these regulations.

Section 18 Training of workers

18. (1) An employer shall ensure that a worker is trained in matters necessary to protect the health and safety of workers at a work site when

(a) the worker begins work at the work site; and

(b) the worker is moved from one work activity or work site to another that differs from the old work site with respect to hazards, equipment, facilities or procedures.

(2) The training required by subsection (1) must include

(a) procedures to be taken in the event of a fire or other emergency;

(b) the location of first aid facilities;

(c) identification of prohibited or restricted areas;

(d) precautions to be taken for the protection of workers from hazardous substances;

(e) procedures, plans, policies and programs that apply to work at the work site; and

(f) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of workers at the work site.

(3) An employer shall ensure that time spent by a worker in the training required by subsection (1) is credited to the worker as time at work, and that he or she does not lose pay or benefits with respect to that time.

(4) An employer shall ensure that a worker is not required or permitted to work unless he or she

(a) is a competent worker; or

(b) is under close and competent supervision.

Section 19 Workers’ contacts with safety officers

19. (1) During an inspection or inquiry by a safety officer at a work site, an employer shall allow any one of the following to accompany the safety officer:

(a) a member of the Committee who, under paragraph 38(a) represents workers or, if such a member is not available, a worker designated by the Committee to represent workers;

(b) the representative or, if he or she is not available, a worker designated by the representative to represent workers;

(c) if there is no Committee member or representative available, a worker designated by the trade union representing workers or if there is no trade union representing workers, a worker designated by a safety officer.

(2) An employer shall allow any worker to consult with a safety officer during an inspection or inquiry at a work site.

(3) An employer shall ensure that the time a worker consults with or accompanies a safety officer during an inspection or inquiry is credited as time at work, and that he or she does not lose pay or benefits.

Section 20 Biological monitoring

20. (1) In this section, "biological monitoring" means measuring, through the assessment of biological specimens collected from a worker, the worker’s total exposure to a hazardous substance present at a work site.

(2) If a worker is the subject of biological monitoring, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the worker is informed of the purposes and the results of the biological monitoring;

(b) at the worker’s request, the detailed results of the biological monitoring are made available to a medical professional, or individual of similar standing under an enactment of a jurisdiction outside the Northwest Territories, who is specified by the worker; and

(c) the aggregate results of the biological monitoring are given to the Committee or representative.

(3) The results of biological monitoring carried out under subsection (2) are deemed to be information of a personal medical nature under subsection 10(1).

Section 21 Occupational health and safety Program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

Section 22 Examination of plant

22. (1) An employer shall arrange for the regular examination of a plant to ensure that, to the extent that is reasonably possible, the plant is capable of

(a) withstanding the stress likely to be imposed on it; and

(b) safely performing the functions for which the plant is used.

(2) An employer shall, as soon as is reasonably possible, correct an unsafe condition found in a plant and take reasonable steps, until the unsafe condition is corrected, to protect the health and safety of workers who could be endangered.

Section 23 Identifying mark of approved equipment

23. (1) This section applies in respect of equipment and personal protective equipment that is required by these regulations to be approved by an agency.

(2) An employer or supplier shall ensure that the approval of equipment and personal protective equipment by an agency is evidenced by a seal, stamp, logo or similar identifying mark of the agency indicating such approval, affixed on

(a) the equipment or personal protective equipment; or

(b) the packaging accompanying the equipment or personal protective equipment.

Section 24 Maintenance and repair of equipment

24. (1) An employer shall ensure that equipment is maintained at intervals that are sufficient to ensure the safe functioning of the equipment.

(2) If a defect is found in equipment, an employer shall ensure that, as soon as is reasonably possible,

(a) steps are taken, until the defect is corrected, to protect the health and safety of workers who could be endangered; and

(b) the defect is corrected by a competent worker or the equipment is replaced.

(3) A worker who knows or has reason to believe that equipment under his or her control is in an unsafe condition shall, as soon as is reasonably possible,

(a) report the condition of the equipment to the employer; and

(b) repair the equipment, if the worker is authorized and competent to do so, or replace the equipment or remove the equipment from service.

Section 25 Boilers and pressure vessels

25. An employer shall ensure that boilers or pressure vessels used at a work site are properly constructed and maintained, even if there is no requirement to inspect or register them under the Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act.

Section 26 Prohibited use of compressed air

26. An employer shall ensure that no compressed air is directed towards a worker for

(a) the purpose of cleaning clothing or personal protective equipment; or

(b) any other purpose, if the use of compressed air could cause dispersion into the air of contaminants that could be harmful to workers.

Section 27 Inspection of work sites

27. (1) An employer shall enable members of the Committee or a representative to inspect a work site at reasonable intervals determined by the Committee and employer or by the representative and employer.

(2) On written notice by the Committee or representative of an unsafe condition or a contravention of the Act or these regulations, the employer shall, as soon as is reasonably possible,

(a) take steps, until the unsafe condition is corrected or the contravention is remedied, to protect the health and safety of workers who could be endangered;

(b) take suitable action to correct the unsafe condition or remedy the contravention; and

(c) inform the Committee or representative in writing

(i) of the steps and action the employer has taken or will take under paragraphs (a) and (b), or

(ii) if the employer has not taken steps and action under paragraphs (a) and (b), the reasons for not taking steps or action.

Section 28 Investigation of certain accidents

28. (1) Subject to section 29, an employer shall ensure that an accident causing serious bodily injury or a dangerous occurrence is investigated as soon as is reasonably possible

(a) by the Committee and employer or by the representative and the employer; or

(b) if no Committee or representative is available, by the employer.

(2) After the investigation of an accident causing serious bodily injury or a dangerous occurrence, an employer shall, in consultation with the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, prepare a written report that includes

(a) a description of the accident or occurrence;

(b) graphics, photographs, video or other evidence that could assist in determining the causes of the accident or occurrence;

(c) identification of unsafe conditions, acts, omissions or procedures that contributed to the accident or occurrence;

(d) an explanation of the causes of the accident or occurrence;

(e) a description of the immediate corrective action taken; and

(f) a description of long-term actions that will be taken to prevent the happening of a similar accident or dangerous occurrence, or the reasons for not taking action.

Section 29 Preserving scene of accident causing death

29. (1) Unless expressly authorized by statute or by subsection (2), a person shall not, other than for the purpose of saving life or relieving human suffering, interfere with, destroy, carry away or alter the position of wreckage, equipment, articles, documents or other things at the scene of, or connected with, an accident causing a death until a safety officer has completed an investigation of the circumstances surrounding the accident.

(2) If an accident causing a death occurs and a safety officer is not able to complete an investigation of the circumstances surrounding the accident, the safety officer may, unless prohibited by statute, grant permission to move wreckage, equipment, articles, documents or other things at the scene or connected with the accident, to an extent that is necessary to allow work to proceed, if he or she is satisfied that

(a) graphics, photographs, video or other evidence showing details at the scene of the accident are made or taken before granting permission; and

(b) a member of the Committee or the representative, if available, has inspected the site of the accident and agreed that the things may be moved.

Section 30 Injuries requiring medical treatment

30. An employer shall

(a) report to the Committee or representative any lost-time injury at the work site that results in a worker receiving medical treatment; and

(b) allow the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, a reasonable opportunity to review the lost-time injury report during normal working hours and without loss of pay or benefits.

Section 31 Work if visibility restricted

31. If visibility in an area at a work site is restricted by smoke, steam or another substance to the extent that a worker is endangered, an employer shall not require or permit the worker to work in that area unless the employer provides the worker with an effective means of communication with another worker who is readily available to provide assistance in an emergency.

Section 32 Work on ice over water

32. (1) This section does not apply to

(a) highways built and maintained by the Department of Transportation; or

(b) roads that are built and maintained to an approved standard.

(2) Before a worker is required or permitted to work or travel on ice that is over water or over other material into which a worker could sink more than 1 m, an employer shall have the ice tested to ensure that the ice will support the load that the work or travel will place on the ice.

(3) The requirement of subsection (2) may be waived by the Chief Safety Officer if an employer or worker satisfies the Chief Safety Officer that other measures have been taken to eliminate or reduce the risk to the worker should the ice fail to support the load.

Section 33 Working alone or at isolated work site

33. (1) In this section, "work alone" means to work at a work site as the only worker at that work site, in circumstances where assistance is not readily available in the event of injury, ill health or emergency.

(2) If a worker is required or permitted to work alone or at an isolated work site, an employer, in consultation with the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the worker and other workers, shall identify the hazards arising from the conditions and circumstances of that work.

(3) An employer shall take reasonable measures to eliminate or reduce the risks posed by the hazards identified under subsection (2), including the establishment of an effective communication system that consists of

(a) radio communication;

(b) phone or cellular phone communication; or

(c) any other means that provides effective communication considering the risks involved.

Section 34 Harassment

34. (1) In this section, "harassment" means, subject to subsections (2) and (3), a course of vexatious comment or conduct at a work site that

(a) is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome; and

(b) constitutes a threat at the work site to the health or safety of a worker.

(2) To constitute harassment for the purposes of subsection (1), any one of the following must have occurred:

(a) repeated conduct, comments, displays, actions or gestures; or

(b) a single, serious occurrence of conduct, or a single, serious comment, display, action or gesture, that has a lasting, harmful effect on the worker’s health or safety.

(3) For the purpose of subsection (1), harassment does not include reasonable action taken by an employer or supervisor relating to the management and direction of the workers or of the work site.

(4) An employer shall, in consultation with the Committee or representative, or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, develop and implement a written policy that includes

(a) a definition of harassment that is consistent with subsections (1), (2) and (3);

(b) a statement that each worker is entitled to work free of harassment;

(c) a commitment that the employer will make every reasonable effort to ensure that workers are not subjected to harassment;

(d) a commitment that the employer will take corrective action respecting any individual who subjects any worker to harassment;

(e) an explanation of how harassment complaints may be brought to the attention of the employer;

(f) a statement that the employer will not disclose the name of a complainant or an alleged harasser or the circumstances relating to the complaint to a person unless disclosure is

(i) necessary for the purposes of investigating the complaint or taking corrective action with respect to the complaint, or

(ii) required by law;

(g) a description of the procedure that the employer will follow to inform a complainant and alleged harasser of the results of an investigation; and

(h) a statement that the employer’s harassment policy is not intended to discourage or prevent a complainant from exercising other legal rights.

(5) An employer shall make readily available to workers a copy of the policy required under subsection (4).

Section 35 Violence

35. (1) In this section, "violence" means attempted, threatened or actual conduct of an individual that causes or is likely to cause injury, such as a threatening statement or behaviour that gives a worker a reasonable belief that he or she is at risk of injury.

(2) For the purposes of this section, work sites where violence may reasonably be expected to occur include work sites that provide the following services or activities:

(a) services provided by health care facilities as defined in section 463;

(b) pharmaceutical dispensing services;

(c) educational services;

(d) police services;

(e) corrections services;

(f) other law enforcement services;

(g) security services;

(h) crisis intervention and counselling services;

(i) financial services;

(j) the sale of alcoholic beverages or the provision of premises for the consumption of alcoholic beverages;

(k) taxi services;

(l) transit services.

(3) An employer shall, at a work site where violence has occurred or could reasonably be expected to occur, after consultation with the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, develop and implement a written policy to deal with potential violence.

(4) The policy required by subsection (3) must be in writing and must include

(a) a commitment that the employer will eliminate or reduce the risk of violence at the work site;

(b) the identification of the work site or work sites where violence has occurred or could reasonably be expected to occur;

(c) the identification of staff positions at the work site that were, or could reasonably be expected to be, exposed to violence;

(d) the procedure to be followed by the employer to inform workers of the nature and extent of risk from violence, including information in the employer’s possession about the risk of violence from individuals who have a history of violent behaviour and whom workers are likely to encounter in the course of their work, unless the disclosure is prohibited by law;

(e) the actions the employer will take to eliminate or reduce the risk of violence, including the use of personal protective equipment, administrative arrangements and engineering controls;

(f) the procedure to be followed by a worker who is exposed to violence to report the incident to the employer;

(g) the procedure the employer will follow to document and investigate violence reported under paragraph (f);

(h) a recommendation that a worker who has been exposed to violence consult the worker’s physician for treatment or referral for post-incident counselling;

(i) the employer’s commitment to provide training programs for workers that include

(i) the means to recognize potentially violent situations,

(ii) procedures, work practices, administrative arrangements and engineering controls to eliminate or reduce the risk of violence to workers,

(iii) the appropriate responses of workers to violence, including how to obtain assistance, and

(iv) procedures for reporting violence.

(5) If a worker receives treatment or counselling referred to in paragraph (4)(h) or attends a training program referred to in paragraph (4)(i), the employer shall ensure that the time spent receiving treatment or counselling or attending training is credited to the worker as time at work, and that the worker does not lose pay or benefits with respect to that time.

(6) An employer shall make a copy of the policy required under subsection (3) readily available to workers.

(7) An employer shall ensure that the policy required under subsection (3) is reviewed and, if necessary, revised not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

Section 36 Late night premises

36. (1) In this section, "late night retail premises" means a work site that is open to the public between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. for the purposes of making retail sales to consumers.

(2) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall

(a) conduct a work site hazard assessment in accordance with an approved industry standard; and

(b) review and, if necessary, revise the work site hazard assessment not less than once every three years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall implement the following security measures:

(a) the development of written safe cash handling procedures that minimize the amount of money that is readily accessible to workers in the establishment;

(b) the use of video cameras that capture key areas in the work site including cash desks and outdoor gas pumps, if applicable;

(c) the establishment of measures to ensure good visibility into and out of the premises;

(d) the placement of signs to indicate

(i) the workers’ limited access to cash and valuables, and

(ii) the use of video cameras on the premises.

(4) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. shall

(a) implement a check-in system and a written check-in procedure for the workers; and

(b) provide a personal emergency transmitter to be worn by the workers that signals for emergency response when activated.

Part 26 FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS

Section 394 Fire safety plan

394. (1) An employer shall

(a) take reasonable steps to prevent the outbreak of fire at a work site and to provide effective means to protect workers from a fire that could occur; and

(b) develop and implement a written fire safety plan that provides for the safety of workers in the event of a fire.

(2) A fire safety plan developed under subsection (1) must include

(a) emergency procedures to be used in case of fire, including

(i) sounding the fire alarm,

(ii) notifying the fire department, and

(iii) evacuating endangered workers, with special provisions for workers with disabilities;

(b) quantities, locations and storage methods of flammable substances present at the work site;

(c) provisions that designate individuals to carry out the plan and the duties of those individuals;

(d) provisions that outline the training of individuals designated under paragraph (c) and of workers in their responsibilities for fire safety;

(e) provisions that indicate when fire drills are held; and

(f) provisions that outline how fire hazards are controlled.

(3) An employer shall ensure that

(a) individuals designated under paragraph (2)(c) and workers who have been assigned fire safety duties are adequately trained in, and implement, the fire safety plan;

(b) the fire safety plan is posted in a conspicuous place for reference by workers; and

(c) a fire drill is held not less than once a year.

Section 395 Fire extinguishers

395. (1) An employer shall ensure that portable fire extinguishers are selected, located, inspected, maintained and tested so that the health and safety of workers at the work site is protected.

(2) An employer shall ensure that portable fire extinguishers are placed not more than 9 m from

(a) an industrial open-flame portable heating device, tar pot or asphalt kettle that is in use; and

(b) a welding or cutting operation that is in progress.

Part 5 FIRST AID

Section 54 Interpretation

54. In this Part,

"close" means, in relation to a work site, a work site no more than 30 minutes’ travel time from a hospital or medical facility under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

"distant" means, in relation to a work site, a work site that is between 30 minutes’ and two hours’ travel time from a hospital or medical facility under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

"medical facility" means a medical clinic or office where a medical professional is readily available.

Section 55 Application

55. This Part does not apply to

(a) a hospital, medical clinic, medical professional’s office, nursing home or other health care facility as defined in section 463, where a medical professional is readily available; or

(b) a close work site at which the work performed is entirely of an administrative, professional or clerical nature that does not require substantial physical exertion or exposure to potentially hazardous conditions, work processes or substances.

Section 56 Provision of first aid

56. Subject to section 57, an employer shall

(a) provide the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation required by this Part to render prompt and appropriate first aid to workers at a work site;

(b) review the provisions of this Part in consultation with the Committee or representative or, if there is no Committee or representative available, the workers;

(c) if the provisions of this Part are not adequate to meet a specific hazard at a work site, provide additional first aid attendants, supplies, equipment and facilities that are appropriate for the hazard; and

(d) ensure that, where a worker could be entrapped or incapacitated in a situation that could be dangerous to an individual involved in the rescue operation,

(i) an effective written procedure for the rescue of the worker is developed, and

(ii) suitable first aid attendants and rescue equipment are provided.

Section 57 Multiple employers

57. (1) If there are multiple employers at a work site,

(a) the employers may agree in writing to provide collectively the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation for injured workers required by this Part; or

(b) a safety officer may require the employers to provide collectively the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation for injured workers required by this Part.

(2) If subsection (1) applies, the total number of workers of all employers at the work site is deemed to be the number of workers at the work site.

Section 58 First aid attendants

58. (1) An employer shall provide the first aid attendants and supplies as summarized in Schedule G for

(a) the distance of the work site to the nearest medical facility; and

(b) the number of workers at the work site at any one time.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a first aid attendant required by these regulations has

(a) a Level 1 qualification as set out in Schedule A; or

(b) a Level 2 qualification as set out in Schedule B.

(3) If rescue personnel are required by these regulations to be provided at a work site, the employer shall ensure that not less than one first aid attendant with a Level 1 qualification is readily available during working hours, in addition to what is required under subsection (1).

(4) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Part, if an employer provides lodging for workers at or near a distant or isolated work site, the employer shall provide the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment and facilities set out in Schedules G, H, I and J based on the total number of workers at or near the work site, whether or not the workers are all working at any one time.

(5) An employer shall

(a) allow a first aid attendant and any other worker that the first aid attendant needs for assistance, to provide prompt and adequate first aid to a worker who has been injured or taken ill; and

(b) ensure that the first aid attendant and any other worker assisting the first aid attendant have adequate time, with no loss of pay or benefits, to provide first aid.

Section 59 Certificates

59. (1) A certificate issued by an approved agency is not valid for the purposes of this Part, unless the certificate specifies a level of qualification and an expiry date.

(2) A certificate referred to in subsection (1) must indicate an expiry date that is not more than three years from its date of issue.

Section 60 First aid station

60. (1) An employer shall, at each work site, provide and maintain a readily accessible first aid station that contains

(a) a first aid box containing the supplies and equipment set out in Schedule H;

(b) a suitable first aid manual; and

(c) any other supplies and equipment required by these regulations.

(2) An employer shall ensure that

(a) the location of a first aid station is clearly and conspicuously identified; and

(b) at each first aid station, an appropriate emergency procedure is prominently displayed that includes

(i) an emergency telephone number list and other instructions for reaching the nearest fire, police, ambulance, hospital or other appropriate service, and

(ii) any written rescue procedure required by subparagraph 56(d)(i).

Section 61 First aid room

61. If there are likely to be 100 or more workers working at a distant or isolated work site at any one time, an employer shall provide a first aid room that

(a) is of adequate size, is clean and is provided with adequate lighting, ventilation and heating;

(b) is equipped with

(i) a permanently installed sink, with hot and cold water,

(ii) the first aid supplies, documents and equipment required by this Part, and

(iii) a cot or bed with pillows;

(c) is under the charge of a first aid attendant with the qualifications required by this Part, who is readily available to provide first aid; and

(d) is used exclusively for the purposes of administering first aid.

Section 62 First aid register

62. An employer shall ensure that

(a) each first aid station and first aid room is provided with a first aid register;

(b) the particulars of first aid treatments administered or cases referred to medical attention are recorded in the first aid register;

(c) the first aid register is readily available for inspection by the Committee or representative; and

(d) a first aid register that is no longer in use is retained for a period of not less than three years after the day on which the register ceased to be used.

Section 63 Workers being transported

63. If workers are being transported by an employer from a distant or isolated work site to a first aid station, medical clinic, medical professional’s office, hospital or other health care facility as defined in section 463, the employer shall provide a first aid box that contains the supplies and equipment set out in Schedule H and that is readily available to the workers being transported.

Section 64 First aid supplies and equipment

64. (1) An employer shall ensure that

(a) first aid supplies and equipment are protected and kept in a clean and dry state; and

(b) no supplies, equipment or materials other than supplies and equipment for first aid are kept in the first aid box.

(2) An employer shall, at a work site where a first aid attendant is required under section 58, provide additional supplies and equipment set out in

(a) Schedule I, if the first aid attendant requires a Level 1 qualification; or

(b) Schedule J, if the first aid attendant requires a Level 2 qualification.

(3) At a distant or isolated work site, an employer shall provide and make readily accessible to workers two blankets, a stretcher and splints for upper and lower limbs.

Section 65 Transportation of injured workers

65. (1) An employer shall ensure that a means of transportation for injured workers to a medical facility or hospital is available.

(2) The following meet the requirements of subsection (1):

(a) an ambulance service that is within 30 minutes’ travel time from the ambulance base to the work site under normal travel conditions;

(b) a suitable means of transportation, having regard to the distance to be travelled and the hazards to which workers are exposed, that affords protection against the weather and is equipped, if reasonably possible, with a means of communication that permits contact with the medical facility or hospital to which the injured worker is being transported and with the work site.

(3) If a stretcher is required under subsection 64(3), an employer shall ensure that the means of transportation provided under paragraph (2)(b) is capable of accommodating and securing an occupied stretcher.

(4) An employer shall provide a means of communication to summon the transportation required by subsection (1).

(5) If a worker is seriously injured or, in the opinion of a first aid attendant needs to be accompanied during transportation, an employer shall ensure that the worker is accompanied by a first aid attendant during transportation.

Section 66 Asphyxiation and poisoning

66. If a worker is at risk of asphyxiation or poisoning, the employer shall ensure that reasonable emergency arrangements are made, prior to commencement of the work, for the rescue of the worker and for the prompt provision of antidotes, supportive measures, first aid, medical attention and any other arrangements that are appropriate to eliminate or reduce the risk to the health and safety of the worker.

Section 67 Additional provisions

67. A safety officer may require an employer to take additional measures beyond what is required in this Part for first aid and emergency arrangements at a work site to be adequate if, in the opinion of the safety officer, first aid and emergency arrangements at a work site are inadequate.

SAFETY ACT
R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. S-1

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 4 Duty of employer

4. (1) Every employer shall

(a) maintain his or her establishment in such a manner that the health and safety of persons in the establishment are not likely to be endangered;

(b) take all reasonable precautions and adopt and carry out all reasonable techniques and procedures to ensure the health and safety of every person in his or her establishment; and

(c) provide the first aid service requirements set out in the regulations pertaining to his or her class of establishment.

(2) If two or more employers have charge of an establishment, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner of the establishment, shall coordinate the activities of the employers in the establishment to ensure the health and safety of persons in the establishment.

[S.N.W.T. 2003, c. 25, s. 3]

Section 5 Duty of worker

5. Every worker employed on or in connection with an establishment shall, in the course of his or her employment,

(a) take all reasonable precautions to ensure his or her own safety and the safety of other persons in the establishment; and

(b) as the circumstances require, use devices and articles of clothing or equipment that are intended for his or her protection and provided to the worker by his or her employer, or required pursuant to the regulations to be used or worn by the worker.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General Duties of Employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Section 14 Young persons

14. (1) An employer shall ensure that an individual under 16 years of age is not required or permitted to work

(a) on a construction site;

(b) in a production process at a pulp mill, saw mill or woodworking establishment;

(c) in a production process at a smelter, foundry, refinery or metal processing or fabricating operation;

(d) in a confined space;

(e) in a forestry or logging operation;

(f) as an operator of powered mobile equipment, a crane or a hoist;

(g) where exposure to a chemical or biological substance is likely to endanger the health or safety of the individual; or

(h) in power line construction or maintenance.

(2) An employer shall ensure that an individual under 18 years of age is not required or permitted to work

(a) as an occupational worker as defined in section 339;

(b) in an asbestos process as defined in section 364;

(c) in a silica process as defined in section 380; or

(d) in an activity requiring the use of an atmosphere-supplying respirator.

Section 15 Duty of principal contractor to inform

15. The principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, an employer, shall give notice in writing to each other employer and worker at a work site, setting out

(a) the name of the individual who is supervising the work on behalf of the principal contractor or employer;

(b) emergency facilities available for use by workers;

(c) if a Committee is established under section 37, the existence of the Committee at the work site and the means to contact the Committee; and

(d) if a representative is designated under section 39, the identity of the representative at the work site and the means to contact him or her.

Section 16 Supervision of work

16. (1) An employer shall ensure that, at a work site,

(a) work is sufficiently and competently supervised;

(b) supervisors have sufficient knowledge of the following:

(i) any occupational health and safety program applicable to workers supervised at the work site,

(ii) the safe handling, use, storage, production and disposal of hazardous substances,

(iii) the need for, and safe use of, personal protective equipment,

(iv) emergency procedures required by these regulations,

(v) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of workers;

(c) supervisors have completed an approved regulatory familiarization program; and

(d) supervisors comply with the Act and these regulations.

(2) A supervisor shall ensure that workers comply with the Act and these regulations as they apply to the work site.

Section 17 Duty to inform workers

17. An employer shall ensure that workers

(a) are informed of the provisions of the Act and these regulations as they apply to the work site; and

(b) comply with the Act and these regulations.

Section 18 Training of workers

18. (1) An employer shall ensure that a worker is trained in matters necessary to protect the health and safety of workers at a work site when

(a) the worker begins work at the work site; and

(b) the worker is moved from one work activity or work site to another that differs from the old work site with respect to hazards, equipment, facilities or procedures.

(2) The training required by subsection (1) must include (a)

(a) procedures to be taken in the event of a fire or other emergency;

(b) the location of first aid facilities;

(c) identification of prohibited or restricted areas;

(d) precautions to be taken for the protection of workers from hazardous substances;

(e) procedures, plans, policies and programs that apply to work at the work site; and

(f) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of workers at the work site.

(3) An employer shall ensure that time spent by a worker in the training required by subsection (1) is credited to the worker as time at work, and that he or she does not lose pay or benefits with respect to that time.

(4) An employer shall ensure that a worker is not required or permitted to work unless he or she

(a) is a competent worker; or

(b) is under close and competent supervision.

Section 19 Workers' contacts with safety officers

19. (1) During an inspection or inquiry by a safety officer at a work site, an employer shall allow any one of the following to accompany the safety officer:

(a) a member of the Committee who, under paragraph 38(a) represents workers or, if such a member is not available, a worker designated by the Committee to represent workers;

(b) the representative or, if he or she is not available, a worker designated by the representative to represent workers;

(c) if there is no Committee member or representative available, a worker designated by the trade union representing workers or if there is no trade union representing workers, a worker designated by a safety officer.

(2) An employer shall allow any worker to consult with a safety officer during an inspection or inquiry at a work site.

(3) An employer shall ensure that the time a worker consults with or accompanies a safety officer during an inspection or inquiry is credited as time at work, and that he or she does not lose pay or benefits.

Section 20 Biological monitoring

20. (1) In this section, "biological monitoring" means measuring, through the assessment of biological specimens collected from a worker, the worker’s total exposure to a hazardous substance present at a work site.

(2) If a worker is the subject of biological monitoring, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the worker is informed of the purposes and the results of the biological monitoring;

(b) at the worker’s request, the detailed results of the biological monitoring are made available to a medical professional, or individual of similar standing under an enactment of a jurisdiction outside Nunavut, who is specified by the worker; and

(c) the aggregate results of the biological monitoring are given to the Committee or representative.

(3) The results of biological monitoring carried out under subsection (2) are deemed to be information of a personal medical nature under subsection 10(1).

Section 21 Occupational health and safety program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

Section 22 Examination of plant

22. (1) An employer shall arrange for the regular examination of a plant to ensure that, to the extent that is reasonably possible, the plant is capable of

(a) withstanding the stress likely to be imposed on it; and

(b) safely performing the functions for which the plant is used.

(2) An employer shall, as soon as is reasonably possible, correct an unsafe condition found in a plant and take reasonable steps, until the unsafe condition is corrected, to protect the health and safety of workers who could be endangered.

Section 23 Identifying mark of approved equipment

23. (1) This section applies in respect of equipment and personal protective equipment that is required by these regulations to be approved by an agency.

(2) An employer or supplier shall ensure that the approval of equipment and personal protective equipment by an agency is evidenced by a seal, stamp, logo or similar identifying mark of the agency indicating such approval, affixed on

(a) the equipment or personal protective equipment; or

(b) the packaging accompanying the equipment or personal protective equipment.

Section 24 Maintenance and repair of equipment

24. (1) An employer shall ensure that equipment is maintained at intervals that are sufficient to ensure the safe functioning of the equipment.

(2) If a defect is found in equipment, an employer shall ensure that, as soon as is reasonably possible,

(a) steps are taken, until the defect is corrected, to protect the health and safety of workers who could be endangered; and

(b) the defect is corrected by a competent worker or the equipment is replaced.

(3) A worker who knows or has reason to believe that equipment under his or her control is in an unsafe condition shall, as soon as is reasonably possible,

(a) report the condition of the equipment to the employer; and

(b) repair the equipment, if the worker is authorized and competent to do so, or replace the equipment or remove the equipment from service.

Section 25 Boilers and pressure vessels

25. An employer shall ensure that boilers or pressure vessels used at a work site are properly constructed and maintained, even if there is no requirement to inspect or register them under the Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act.

Section 26 Prohibited use of compressed air

26. An employer shall ensure that no compressed air is directed towards a worker for

(a) the purpose of cleaning clothing or personal protective equipment; or

(b) any other purpose, if the use of compressed air could cause dispersion into the air of contaminants that could be harmful to workers.

Section 27 Inspection of work sites

27. (1) An employer shall enable members of the Committee or a representative to inspect a work site at reasonable intervals determined by the Committee and employer or by the representative and employer.

(2) On written notice by the Committee or representative of an unsafe condition or a contravention of the Act or these regulations, the employer shall, as soon as is reasonably possible,

(a) take steps, until the unsafe condition is corrected or the contravention is remedied, to protect the health and safety of workers who could be endangered;

(b) take suitable action to correct the unsafe condition or remedy the contravention; and

(c) inform the Committee or representative in writing

(i) of the steps and action the employer has taken or will take under paragraphs (a) and (b), or

(ii) if the employer has not taken steps and action under paragraphs (a) and (b), the reasons for not taking steps or action.

Section 28 Investigation of certain accidents

28. (1) Subject to section 29, an employer shall ensure that an accident causing serious bodily injury or a dangerous occurrence is investigated as soon as is reasonably possible

(a) by the Committee and employer or by the representative and the employer; or

(b) if no Committee or representative is available, by the employer.

(2) After the investigation of an accident causing serious bodily injury or a dangerous occurrence, an employer shall, in consultation with the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, prepare a written report that includes

(a) a description of the accident or occurrence;

(b) graphics, photographs, video or other evidence that could assist in determining the causes of the accident or occurrence;

(c) identification of unsafe conditions, acts, omissions or procedures that contributed to the accident or occurrence;

(d) an explanation of the causes of the accident or occurrence;

(e) a description of the immediate corrective action taken; and

(f) a description of long-term actions that will be taken to prevent the happening of a similar accident or dangerous occurrence, or the reasons for not taking action.

Section 29 Preserving scene of accident causing death

29. (1) Unless expressly authorized by statute or by subsection (2), a person shall not, other than for the purpose of saving life or relieving human suffering, interfere with, destroy, carry away or alter the position of wreckage, equipment, articles, documents or other things at the scene of, or connected with, an accident causing a death until a safety officer has completed an investigation of the circumstances surrounding the accident.

(2) If an accident causing a death occurs and a safety officer is not able to complete an investigation of the circumstances surrounding the accident, the safety officer may, unless prohibited by statute, grant permission to move wreckage, equipment, articles, documents or other things at the scene or connected with the accident, to an extent that is necessary to allow work to proceed, if he or she is satisfied that

(a) graphics, photographs, video or other evidence showing details at the scene of the accident are made or taken before granting permission; and

(b) a member of the Committee or the representative, if available, has inspected the site of the accident and agreed that the things may be moved

Section 30 Injuries requiring medical treatment

30. An employer shall

(a) report to the Committee or representative any lost-time injury at the work site that results in a worker receiving medical treatment; and

(b) allow the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, a reasonable opportunity to review the lost-time injury report during normal working hours and without loss of pay or benefits.

Section 31 Work if visibility restricted

31. If visibility in an area at a work site is restricted by smoke, steam or another substance to the extent that a worker is endangered, an employer shall not require or permit the worker to work in that area unless the employer provides the worker with an effective means of communication with another worker who is readily available to provide assistance in an emergency.

Section 32 Work on ice over water

32. (1) This section does not apply to

(a) highways built and maintained by the Department of Economic Development and Transportation; or

(b) roads that are built and maintained to an approved standard.

(2) Before a worker is required or permitted to work or travel on ice that is over water or over other material into which a worker could sink more than 1 m, an employer shall have the ice tested to ensure that the ice will support the load that the work or travel will place on the ice.

(3) The requirement of subsection (2) may be waived by the Chief Safety Officer if an employer or worker satisfies the Chief Safety Officer that other measures have been taken to eliminate or reduce the risk to the worker should the ice fail to support the load. Working

Section 33 Working alone or at isolated work site

33. (1) In this section, "work alone" means to work at a work site as the only worker at that work site, in circumstances where assistance is not readily available in the event of injury, ill health or emergency.

(2) If a worker is required or permitted to work alone or at an isolated work site, an employer, in consultation with the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the worker and other workers, shall identify the hazards arising from the conditions and circumstances of that work.

(3) An employer shall take reasonable measures to eliminate or reduce the risks posed by the hazards identified under subsection (2), including the establishment of an effective communication system that consists of

(a) radio communication;

(b) phone or cellular phone communication; or

(c) any other means that provides effective communication considering the risks involved.

Section 34 Harassment

34. (1) In this section, "harassment" means, subject to subsections (2) and (3), a course of vexatious comment or conduct at a work site that

(a) is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome; and

(b) constitutes a threat at the work site to the health or safety of a worker.

(2) To constitute harassment for the purposes of subsection (1), any one of the following must have occurred:

(a) repeated conduct, comments, displays, actions or gestures; or

(b) a single, serious occurrence of conduct, or a single, serious comment, display, action or gesture, that has a lasting, harmful effect on the worker’s health or safety.

(3) For the purpose of subsection (1), harassment does not include reasonable action taken by an employer or supervisor relating to the management and direction of the workers or of the work site.

(4) An employer shall, in consultation with the Committee or representative, or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, develop and implement a written policy that includes

(a) a definition of harassment that is consistent with subsections (1), (2) and (3);

(b) a statement that each worker is entitled to work free of harassment;

(c) a commitment that the employer will make every reasonable effort to ensure that workers are not subjected to harassment;

(d) a commitment that the employer will take corrective action respecting any individual who subjects any worker to harassment;

(e) an explanation of how harassment complaints may be brought to the attention of the employer;

(f) a statement that the employer will not disclose the name of a complainant or an alleged harasser or the circumstances relating to the complaint to a person unless disclosure is

(i) necessary for the purposes of investigating the complaint or taking corrective action with respect to the complaint, or

(ii) required by law;

(g) a description of the procedure that the employer will follow to inform a complainant and alleged harasser of the results of an investigation; and

(h) a statement that the employer’s harassment policy is not intended to discourage or prevent a complainant from exercising other legal rights.

(5) An employer shall make readily available to workers a copy of the policy required under subsection (4).

Section 35 Violence

35. (1) In this section, "violence" means attempted, threatened or actual conduct of an individual that causes or is likely to cause injury, such as a threatening statement or behaviour that gives a worker a reasonable belief that he or she is at risk of injury.

(2) For the purposes of this section, work sites where violence may reasonably be expected to occur include work sites that provide the following services or activities:

(a) services provided by health care facilities as defined in section 463;

(b) pharmaceutical dispensing services;

(c) educational services;

(d) police services;

(e) corrections services;

(f) other law enforcement services;

(g) security services;

(h) crisis intervention and counselling services;

(i) financial services;

(j) the sale of alcoholic beverages or the provision of premises for the consumption of alcoholic beverages;

(k) taxi services;

(l) transit services.

(3) An employer shall, at a work site where violence has occurred or could reasonably be expected to occur, after consultation with the Committee or representative or, if no Committee or representative is available, the workers, develop and implement a written policy to deal with potential violence.

(4) The policy required by subsection (3) must be in writing and must include

(a) a commitment that the employer will eliminate or reduce the risk of violence at the work site;

(b) the identification of the work site or work sites where violence has occurred or could reasonably be expected to occur;

(c) the identification of staff positions at the work site that were, or could reasonably be expected to be, exposed to violence;

(d) the procedure to be followed by the employer to inform workers of the nature and extent of risk from violence, including information in the employer’s possession about the risk of violence from individuals who have a history of violent behaviour and whom workers are likely to encounter in the course of their work, unless the disclosure is prohibited by law;

(e) the actions the employer will take to eliminate or reduce the risk of violence, including the use of personal protective equipment, administrative arrangements and engineering controls;

(f) the procedure to be followed by a worker who is exposed to violence to report the incident to the employer;

(g) the procedure the employer will follow to document and investigate violence reported under paragraph (f);

(h) a recommendation that a worker who has been exposed to violence consult the worker’s physician for treatment or referral for post-incident counselling;

(i) the employer’s commitment to provide training programs for workers that include

(i) the means to recognize potentially violent situations,

(ii) procedures, work practices, administrative arrangements and engineering controls to eliminate or reduce the risk of violence to workers,

(iii) the appropriate responses of workers to violence, including how to obtain assistance, and

(iv) procedures for reporting violence.

(5) If a worker receives treatment or counselling referred to in paragraph (4)(h) or attends a training program referred to in paragraph (4)(i), the employer shall ensure that the time spent receiving treatment or counselling or attending training is credited to the worker as time at work, and that the worker does not lose pay or benefits with respect to that time.

(6) An employer shall make a copy of the policy required under subsection (3) readily available to workers.

(7) An employer shall ensure that the policy required under subsection (3) is reviewed and, if necessary, revised not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

Section 36 Late night premises

36. (1) In this section, "late night retail premises" means a work site that is open to the public between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. for the purposes of making retail sales to consumers.

(2) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall

(a) conduct a work site hazard assessment in accordance with an approved industry standard; and

(b) review and, if necessary, revise the work site hazard assessment not less than once every three years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises shall implement the following security measures:

(a) the development of written safe cash handling procedures that minimize the amount of money that is readily accessible to workers in the establishment;

(b) the use of video cameras that capture key areas in the work site including cash desks and outdoor gas pumps, if applicable;

(c) the establishment of measures to ensure good visibility into and out of the premises;

(d) the placement of signs to indicate

(i) the workers’ limited access to cash and valuables, and

(ii) the use of video cameras on the premises.

(4) An employer of workers at a late night retail premises between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. shall

(a) implement a check-in system and a written check-in procedure for the workers; and

(b) provide a personal emergency transmitter to be worn by the workers that signals for emergency response when activated.

Part 26 FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS

Section 394 Fire safety plan

394. (1) An employer shall

(a) take reasonable steps to prevent the outbreak of fire at a work site and to provide effective means to protect workers from a fire that could occur; and

(b) develop and implement a written fire safety plan that provides for the safety of workers in the event of a fire.

(2) A fire safety plan developed under subsection (1) must include

(a) emergency procedures to be used in case of fire, including

(i) sounding the fire alarm,

(ii) notifying the fire department, and

(iii) evacuating endangered workers, with special provisions for workers with disabilities;

(b) quantities, locations and storage methods of flammable substances present at the work site;

(c) provisions that designate individuals to carry out the plan and the duties of those individuals;

(d) provisions that outline the training of individuals designated under paragraph (c) and of workers in their responsibilities for fire safety;

(e) provisions that indicate when fire drills are held; and

(f) provisions that outline how fire hazards are controlled.

(3) An employer shall ensure that

(a) individuals designated under paragraph (2)(c) and workers who have been assigned fire safety duties are adequately trained in, and implement, the fire safety plan;

(b) the fire safety plan is posted in a conspicuous place for reference by workers; and

(c) a fire drill is held not less than once a year.

Section 395 Fire extinguishers

395. (1) An employer shall ensure that portable fire extinguishers are selected, located, inspected, maintained and tested so that the health and safety of workers at the work site is protected.

(2) An employer shall ensure that portable fire extinguishers are placed not more than 9 m from

(a) an industrial open-flame portable heating device, tar pot or asphalt kettle that is in use; and

(b) a welding or cutting operation that is in progress.

Part 5 FIRST AID

Section 54 Interpretation

54. In this Part,

"close" means, in relation to a work site, a work site no more than 30 minutes’ travel time from a hospital or medical facility under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

"distant" means, in relation to a work site, a work site that is between 30 minutes’ and two hours’ travel time from a hospital or medical facility under normal travel conditions using available means of transportation;

"medical facility" means a medical clinic or office where a medical professional is readily available.

Section 55 Application

55. This Part does not apply to

(a) a hospital, medical clinic, medical professional’s office, nursing home or other health care facility as defined in section 463, where a medical professional is readily available; or

(b) a close work site at which the work performed is entirely of an administrative, professional or clerical nature that does not require substantial physical exertion or exposure to potentially hazardous conditions, work processes or substances.

Section 56 Provision of first aid

56. Subject to section 57, an employer shall

(a) provide the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation required by this Part to render prompt and appropriate first aid to workers at a work site;

(b) review the provisions of this Part in consultation with the Committee or representative or, if there is no Committee or representative available, the workers;

(c) if the provisions of this Part are not adequate to meet a specific hazard at a work site, provide additional first aid attendants, supplies, equipment and facilities that are appropriate for the hazard; and

(d) ensure that, where a worker could be entrapped or incapacitated in a situation that could be dangerous to an individual involved in the rescue operation,

(i) an effective written procedure for the rescue of the worker is developed, and

(ii) suitable first aid attendants and rescue equipment are provided.

Section 57 Multiple employers

57. (1) If there are multiple employers at a work site,

(a) the employers may agree in writing to provide collectively the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation for injured workers required by this Part; or

(b) a safety officer may require the employers to provide collectively the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment, facilities and transportation for injured workers required by this Part.

(2) If subsection (1) applies, the total number of workers of all employers at the work site is deemed to be the number of workers at the work site.

Section 58 First aid attendants

58. (1) An employer shall provide the first aid attendants and supplies as summarized in Schedule G for

(a) the distance of the work site to the nearest medical facility; and

(b) the number of workers at the work site at any one time.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a first aid attendant required by these regulations has

(a) a Level 1 qualification as set out in Schedule A; or

(b) a Level 2 qualification as set out in Schedule B.

(3) If rescue personnel are required by these regulations to be provided at a work site, the employer shall ensure that not less than one first aid attendant with a Level 1 qualification is readily available during working hours, in addition to what is required under subsection (1).

(4) Despite any other provision of this Part, if an employer provides lodging for workers at or near a distant or isolated work site, the employer shall provide the first aid attendants, supplies, equipment and facilities set out in Schedules G, H, I and J based on the total number of workers at or near the work site, whether or not the workers are all working at any one time.

(5) An employer shall

(a) allow a first aid attendant and any other worker that the first aid attendant needs for assistance, to provide prompt and adequate first aid to a worker who has been injured or taken ill; and

(b) ensure that the first aid attendant and any other worker assisting the first aid attendant have adequate time, with no loss of pay or benefits, to provide first aid.

Section 59 Certificates

59. (1) A certificate issued by an approved agency is not valid for the purposes of this Part, unless the certificate specifies a level of qualification and an expiry date.

(2) A certificate referred to in subsection (1) must indicate an expiry date that is not more than three years from its date of issue.

Section 60 First aid station

60. (1) An employer shall, at each work site, provide and maintain a readily accessible first aid station that contains

(a) a first aid box containing the supplies and equipment set out in Schedule H;

(b) a suitable first aid manual; and

(c) any other supplies and equipment required by these regulations.

(2) An employer shall ensure that

(a) the location of a first aid station is clearly and conspicuously identified; and

(b) at each first aid station, an appropriate emergency procedure is prominently displayed that includes

(i) an emergency telephone number list and other instructions for reaching the nearest fire, police, ambulance, hospital or other appropriate service, and

(ii) any written rescue procedure required by subparagraph 56(d)(i).

Section 61 First aid room

61. If there are likely to be 100 or more workers working at a distant or isolated work site at any one time, an employer shall provide a first aid room that

(a) is of adequate size, is clean and is provided with adequate lighting, ventilation and heating;

(b) is equipped with

(i) a permanently installed sink, with hot and cold water,

(ii) the first aid supplies, documents and equipment required by this Part, and

(iii) a cot or bed with pillows;

(c) is under the charge of a first aid attendant with the qualifications required by this Part, who is readily available to provide first aid; and

(d) is used exclusively for the purposes of administering first aid.

Section 62 First aid register

62. An employer shall ensure that

(a) each first aid station and first aid room is provided with a first aid register;

(b) the particulars of first aid treatments administered or cases referred to medical attention are recorded in the first aid register;

(c) the first aid register is readily available for inspection by the Committee or representative; and

(d) a first aid register that is no longer in use is retained for a period of not less than three years after the day on which the register ceased to be used.

Section 63 Workers being transported

63. If workers are being transported by an employer from a distant or isolated work site to a first aid station, medical clinic, medical professional’s office, hospital or other health care facility as defined in section 463, the employer shall provide a first aid box that contains the supplies and equipment set out in Schedule H and that is readily available to the workers being transported.

Section 64 First aid supplies and equipment

64. (1) An employer shall ensure that

(a) first aid supplies and equipment are protected and kept in a clean and dry state; and

(b) no supplies, equipment or materials other than supplies and equipment for first aid are kept in the first aid box.

(2) An employer shall, at a work site where a first aid attendant is required under section 58, provide additional supplies and equipment set out in

(a) Schedule I, if the first aid attendant requires a Level 1 qualification; or

(b) Schedule J, if the first aid attendant requires a Level 2 qualification

(3) At a distant or isolated work site, an employer shall provide and make readily accessible to workers two blankets, a stretcher and splints for upper and lower limbs.

Section 65 Transportation of injured workers

65. (1) An employer shall ensure that a means of transportation for injured workers to a medical facility or hospital is available.

(2) The following meet the requirements of subsection (1):

(a) an ambulance service that is within 30 minutes’ travel time from the ambulance base to the work site under normal travel conditions;

(b) a suitable means of transportation, having regard to the distance to be travelled and the hazards to which workers are exposed, that affords protection against the weather and is equipped, if reasonably possible, with a means of communication that permits contact with the medical facility or hospital to which the injured worker is being transported and with the work site.

(3) If a stretcher is required under subsection 64(3), an employer shall ensure that the means of transportation provided under paragraph (2)(b) is capable of accommodating and securing an occupied stretcher.

(4) An employer shall provide a means of communication to summon the transportation required by subsection (1).

(5) If a worker is seriously injured or, in the opinion of a first aid attendant needs to be accompanied during transportation, an employer shall ensure that the worker is accompanied by a first aid attendant during transportation.

Section 66 Asphyxiation and poisoning

66. If a worker is at risk of asphyxiation or poisoning, the employer shall ensure that reasonable emergency arrangements are made, prior to commencement of the work, for the rescue of the worker and for the prompt provision of antidotes, supportive measures, first aid, medical attention and any other arrangements that are appropriate to eliminate or reduce the risk to the health and safety of the worker.

Section 67 Additional provisions

67. A safety officer may require an employer to take additional measures beyond what is required in this Part for first aid and emergency arrangements at a work site to be adequate if, in the opinion of the safety officer, first aid and emergency arrangements at a work site are inadequate.

SAFETY ACT
R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. S-1

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 4 Duty of employer

4. (1) Every employer shall

(a) maintain his or her establishment in such a manner that the health and safety of persons in the establishment are not likely to be endangered;

(b) take all reasonable precautions and adopt and carry out all reasonable techniques and procedures to ensure the health and safety of every person in his or her establishment; and

(c) provide the first aid service requirements set out in the regulations pertaining to his or her class of establishment.

(2) If two or more employers have charge of an establishment, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner of the establishment, shall coordinate the activities of the employers in the establishment to ensure compliance with subsection 4(1).

[S.Nu. 2003, c. 25, s. 4]

Section 5 Duty of worker

5. Every worker employed on or in connection with an establishment shall, in the course of his or her employment,

(a) take all reasonable precautions to ensure his or her own safety and the safety of other persons in the establishment; and

(b) as the circumstances require, use devices and articles of clothing or equipment that are intended for his or her protection and provided to the worker by his or her employer, or required pursuant to the regulations to be used or worn by the worker.

Accueil

Établissement et gestion des campements - Industriel

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

Lorsque les opérations en milieu de travail se déroulent en régions éloignées, les employeurs mettent sur pied des campements de travail ou des campements sur place. Les campements sur place sont réglementés comme un « lieu de travail isolé » au titre du Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail et comme un « campement isolé » dans le Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité dans les mines. Lorsque les travailleurs sont susceptibles de travailler dans l’isolement et/ou sur des sites éloignés, ils sont exposés à des risques supplémentaires par rapport aux travailleurs des lieux de travail réguliers. Selon l’emplacement du campement, les dangers peuvent varier.

Les employeurs qui dirigent des campements industriels, mais qui ne sont pas régis par la Loi sur la santé et la sécurité dans les mines, doivent satisfaire à toutes les exigences en matière de santé et de sécurité pour les milieux de travail industriels ainsi qu’aux exigences propres au campement. Les exigences supplémentaires en matière de santé et de sécurité sont traitées en détail dans le Code de pratique sur l'établissement et la gestion des campements de la CSTIT. Ce code de pratique décrit les diverses exigences réglementaires pour les camps sur place, les dangers et les risques potentiels qui pourraient exister dans les campements, et la façon de maîtriser ces dangers et ces risques. Les employeurs des campements doivent envisager de mettre en œuvre ce code de pratique, car un campement bien aménagé favorise un environnement sain et sécuritaire pour les travailleurs.

Quelle que soit la taille du campement, tous les employeurs sont tenus d’éliminer ou de réduire les risques identifiés lors de l’évaluation des dangers à l’aide de mesures de maîtrise appropriées. Les employeurs comptant 20 travailleurs ou plus sont tenus d’atténuer les risques dans le cadre du programme de santé et de sécurité au travail (SST) de leur campement. Si un employeur n’est pas tenu d’avoir un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail (moins de 20 travailleurs et n’est pas tenu d’en avoir un selon les directives de l’agent de sécurité en chef) , pour des raisons de diligence raisonnable, il est recommandé qu’il en prépare un tout de même. Un programme de SST peut aider l’employeur à identifier les nombreux dangers et défis uniques que l’on pourrait rencontrer dans les campements sur place éloignés ou isolés.

Avant d’installer un campement sur place, les employeurs doivent préparer un plan opérationnel qui tient compte des facteurs liés à la santé qui suivent :  

  • emplacement du site;
  • taille du campement;
  • aménagement du campement (y compris l’hébergement);
  • approvisionnement en eau potable et stockage hygiénique des aliments;
  • emplacement et construction des systèmes d’élimination des eaux usées;
  • gestion des déchets.

En raison des dangers uniques qui existent dans les campements sur place, les éléments supplémentaires qui doivent être pris en compte dans le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail (SST) du campement sont les suivants :

  • réglementation, politiques et pratiques sécuritaires relatives aux armes à feu;
  • politiques et pratiques en matière d’espèces sauvages;
  • politiques relatives à la consommation d’alcool et de drogues;
  • entraînement de survie;
  • équipement de navigation ou d’orientation;
  • déplacements en région isolée;
  • prévention des incendies et sécurité;
  • carburants (p. ex. essence, diesel, propane, etc.);
  • matières dangereuses (p. ex. gaz comprimés);
  • génératrices et autre équipement électrique (y compris les procédures de verrouillage);
  • piles;
  • appareils de chauffage et appareils de camp;
  • équipement de camp;
  • sources de monoxyde de carbone;
  • hygiène des travailleurs;
  • salubrité de l’eau et des aliments;
  • équipement de communication;
  • inspections de camp;
  • planification des premiers soins en cas d’urgence;
  • gestion des déchets;
  • manutention des matériaux.

Les employeurs de campements industriels doivent :

  • préparer un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail (SST) lorsqu’ils ont 20 travailleurs et plus. Le programme de SST doit comprendre des pratiques et des procédures sécuritaires pour les dangers propres au campement. Parmi ces dangers figurent ceux qui sont énumérés plus bas, dans la section portant sur les employeurs et la diligence raisonnable.
  • avoir des procédures de premiers soins; se conformer aux exigences en matière de premiers soins.
  • fournir le meilleur équipement de communication pour l’emplacement géographique et le terrain; fournir au campement suffisamment d’équipement, y compris un système de secours indépendant; afficher les instructions d’utilisation de tout l’équipement de communication pour en faciliter l’accès en cas d’urgence. Dans les lieux de travail éloignés, les téléphones cellulaires peuvent ne pas être un moyen de communication approprié pour les travailleurs, en particulier les travailleurs sur le terrain qui pourraient devoir travailler seuls.
  • élaborer des procédures de sécurité en cas d’incendie pour le campement;
  • s’assurer qu’il y ait des extincteurs d’incendie de taille appropriée dans la cuisine du campement, en fonction de l’évaluation des dangers.

                            
Pour des raisons de diligence raisonnable , les employeurs de campements industriels doivent :  

  • avoir un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail lorsqu’ils ont moins de 20 travailleurs;
  • veiller à ce que les ressources en eau dans les campements établis soient conformes aux exigences de l’Office des eaux de la région (il existe cinq offices des eaux dans les T.-N.-O. et un dans le Nunavut);
  • s’assurer que l’aménagement du campement satisfait aux réglementations supplémentaires en matière d’incendie, de santé, de sécurité et d’environnement;
  • organiser l’aide d’urgence et le transport; envisager des scénarios, comme de mauvaises conditions météorologiques, qui pourraient retarder l’intervention en cas d’urgence;
  • s’assurer que des moyens de communication avec tous les chantiers exploités à partir d’un campement isolé sont disponibles en tout temps avant de mettre en place un campement sur place isolé;
  • déterminer si un observateur de la faune est nécessaire ou non;
  • élaborer une politique et des pratiques sécuritaires pour l’interaction avec la faune; demander aux travailleurs de ne pas nourrir les animaux sauvages. Consulter le ministère de l’Environnement et des Ressources naturelles (MRN) concernant les règlements sur les interactions avec la faune et les pratiques de sécurité recommandées pour le territoire. Les employeurs doivent éduquer leurs travailleurs sur les dangers, y compris les attaques animales, et sur la façon de maîtriser ce danger.
  • élaborer une politique et des pratiques sécuritaires pour l’utilisation, l’entretien et l’entreposage sécuritaires des armes à feu dans le campement;
  • s’assurer qu’une personne qualifiée éduque et forme les travailleurs sur les dangers propres au site et les mesures de maîtrise. La formation doit comprendre des renseignements sur les dangers liés à la faune, les techniques de survie et l’utilisation d’équipement spécial comme l’équipement de navigation ou d’orientation pour éviter de se perdre, l’équipement de communication, les bateaux, l’utilisation d’équipement de protection, etc.;
  • prévoir un abri d’urgence pour les campements qui soit doté de structures interconnectées qui ne seront pas affectées par un incendie au niveau de la structure principale. Les abris d’urgence doivent être équipés d’un appareil de chauffage, d’une trousse de premiers soins conforme à l’annexe I du Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail, d’un système d’approvisionnement en carburant, d’équipement de communication et d’autres équipements, comme des fusées éclairantes, qui peuvent être utilisés à des fins de sauvetage.
  • élaborer une procédure pour la manutention d’équipement et de matériaux avec l’utilisation d’un aéronef;
  • élaborer une procédure pour les scénarios d’urgence et l’équipement de survie.

Les travailleurs des campements industriels isolés doivent :

  • se conformer aux instructions de l’employeur, aux procédures d’exploitation sécuritaire et aux pratiques sécuritaires;
  • utiliser, entretenir et entreposer les dispositifs, l’équipement de protection individuelle et/ou l’équipement selon les instructions de l’employeur;
  • éviter de nourrir les espèces sauvages;
  • n’utiliser les armes à feu que conformément aux pratiques sécuritaires de l’employeur;
  • se conformer à la politique sur les drogues et l’alcool sur le lieu de travail;
  • ne pas polluer l’environnement environnant; utiliser les infrastructures d’hygiène prévues par l’employeur; se conformer aux procédures de gestion des déchets sur le lieu de travail et aux procédures et pratiques d’hygiène.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure du possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Section 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, le matériel de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou mises en place conformément au présent règlement.

Section 14 Personnes mineures

14. (1) L’employeur s’assure qu’aucune personne âgée de moins de 16 ans n’est obligée ni autorisée à travailler, selon le cas :

a) sur un chantier de construction;

b) à un procédé de production dans une usine de pâte, une scierie ou une menuiserie;

c) à un procédé de production dans une fonderie ou une affinerie, dans le travail du métal ou dans des activités de fabrication;

d) dans un espace restreint;

e) dans des opérations forestières;

f) à titre d’opérateur de matériel mobile motorisé, de grue ou de monte-charge;

g) si l’exposition à un agent chimique ou biologique est susceptible de mettre en danger la santé ou la sécurité de cette personne;

h) à la construction ou à l’entretien de lignes électriques.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’aucune personne âgée de moins de 18 ans n’est obligée ni autorisée à travailler, selon le cas :

a) à titre de travailleur du secteur nucléaire au sens de l’article 339;

b) à des travaux d’amiante au sens de l’article 364;

c) à des travaux de silice au sens de l’article 380;

d) à une activité exigeant l’utilisation d’un appareil respiratoire à alimentation d’air.

Section 15 Obligation de l’entrepreneur principal de fournir des renseignements

15. L’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y a pas d’entrepreneur principal, l’employeur, remet à chaque autre employeur et à chaque travailleur se trouvant sur le lieu de travail un avis écrit indiquant :

a) le nom du particulier qui supervise les travaux pour le compte de l’entrepreneur principal ou de l’employeur;

b) les installations d’urgence qui sont à la disposition des travailleurs;

c) si un Comité est créé en vertu de l’article 37, l’existence du Comité au lieu de travail et les moyens de communiquer avec le Comité;

d) si un représentant est désigné en vertu de l’article 39, l’identité du représentant se trouvant sur le lieu de travail et les moyens de communiquer avec ce dernier.

Section 16 Supervision des travaux

16. (1) L’employeur s’assure que, à tout lieu de travail :

a) les travaux sont supervisés de façon sécuritaire et compétente;

b) les superviseurs ont une connaissance suffisante de ce qui suit :

(i) tout programme de santé et de sécurité au travail applicable aux travailleurs supervisés sur le lieu de travail,

(ii) la manipulation, l’utilisation, le stockage, la production et l’élimination en toute sécurité des substances dangereuses,

(iii) la nécessité de disposer d’équipment de protection individuelle et d’utiliser cet équipement de manière sécuritaire,

(iv) les procédures d’urgence exigées par le présent règlement,

(v) tout autre mesure nécessair pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) les superviseurs ont suivi un programme de familiarisation réglementaire approuvé;

d) les superviseurs se conforment à la Loi et au présent règlement.

(2) Le superviseur s’assure que les travailleurs se conforment à la Loi et au présent règlement dans la mesure où ceux-ci s’appliquent au lieu de travail.

Section 17 Obligation d’informer les travailleurs

17. L’employeur s’assure que les travailleurs :

a) ont connaissance des dispositions de la Loi et du présent règlement qui s’appliquent au lieu de travail;

b) se conforment à la Loi et au présent règlement.

Section 18 Formation des travailleurs

18. (1) L’employeur veille à ce que tout travailleur ait obtenu une formation en ce qui a trait à toute mesure nécessaire pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs au lieu de travail :

a) lorsque le travailleur commence au lieu de travail;

b) lorsque le travailleur est affecté à une autre activité ou à un autre lieu de travail qui diffère du précédent en ce qui a trait aux dangers, à l’équipement, aux installations ou aux procédures.

(2) La formation exigée au paragraphe (1) doit notamment traiter des questions suivantes :

a) la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, notamment en cas d’incendie;

b) l’emplacement des installations de premiers soins;

c) l’identification des aires dont l’accès est interdit ou restreint;

d) les précautions à prendre en vue de protéger les travailleurs contre les substances dangereuses;

e) les procédures, plans, politiques et programmes applicables aux travaux dans le lieu de travail;

f) toute autre mesure necessaire pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs sur le lieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur s’assure que le temps que les travailleurs consacrent à la formation exigée par le paragraphe (1) est considéré comme du temps passé au travail et veille à ce que les travailleurs ne perdent aucun salaire ni avantage.

(4) L’employeur s’assure qu’un travailleur est obligé de travailler ou autorisé à travailler uniquement si le travailleur, selon le cas :

a) est un travailleur compétent;

b) fait l’objet d’une supervision étroite exercée avec compétence.

Section 19 Communication entre les travailleurs et les agents de sécurité

19. (1) Lorsqu’un agent de sécurité effectue une inspection ou une enquête sur le lieu de travail, l’employeur permet à l’une des personnes suivantes d’accompagner l’agent :

a) un membre du Comité qui, en vertu de l’alinéa 38a), représente les travailleurs ou, si un tel membre n’est pas disponible, un travailleur désigné pour représenter les travailleurs par le Comité;

b) le représentant ou, s’il n’est pas disponible, un travailleur désigné pour représenter les travailleurs par le représentant;

c) si aucun membre du Comité ou représentant n’est disponible, un travailleur désigné par le syndicat représentant les travailleurs ou, si les travailleurs ne sont pas représentés par un syndicat, un travailleur désigné par un agent de sécurité.

(2) L’employeur permet à tous les travailleurs de consulter l’agent de sécurité effectuant une inspection ou une enquête au lieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur s’assure que le temps pendant lequel les travailleurs consultent ou accompagnent l’agent de sécurité est considéré comme du temps passé au travail et veille à ce que les travailleurs ne perdent aucun salaire ni avantage.

Section 20 Contrôle biologique

20. (1) Dans le présent article, «contrôle biologique» se dit du fait de mesurer, par voie d’évaluation d’échantillons de matériel biologique recueillis d’un travailleur, l’exposition totale du travailleur à une substance dangereuse présente dans le lieu de travail.

(2) Si un travailleur fait l’objet d’un contrôle biologique, l’employeur s’assure que :

a) le travailleur est informé de l’objet et des résultats du contrôle biologique;

b) à la demande du travailleur, les résultats détaillés du contrôle biologique sont mis à la disposition d’un professionnel de la santé, ou d’une personne ayant un statut équivalent en vertu d’un texte législatif d’un ressort autre que les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, que le travailleur désigne;

c) les résultats d’ensemble du contrôle biologique sont remis au Comité ou au représentant.

(3) Les résultats du contrôle biologique visé au paragraphe (2) sont réputés des renseignements personnels de nature médicale visés au paragraphe 10(1).

Section 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) le Comité ou un représentant;

b) les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé au présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

Section 22 Inspection des installations de chantier

22. (1) L’employeur fait en sorte que les installations de chantier soient régulièrement inspectées afin de s’assurer que, dans la mesure de ce qui est raisonnablement possible, les installations sont capables :

a) de soutenir les pressions qui sont susceptibles de leur être imposées;

b) de réaliser en toute sécurité les travaux pour lesquels elles sont utilisées.

(2) L’employeur corrige dans les meilleurs délais toute situation dangereuse relevée dans une installation de chantier et, dans l’intervalle, prend des mesures raisonnables pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs susceptibles d’être exposés au danger.

Section 23 Marque d’identification de l’équipement approuvé

23. (1) Le présent article s’applique à l’équipement et à l’équipement de protection individuelle qui doivent être approuvés par un organisme en application du présent règlement.

(2) L’employeur ou le fournisseur s’assure que l’approbation de l’équipement et de l’équipement de protection individuelle prévue au paragraphe (1) est étayée par le sceau, timbre, logo ou toute autre marque d’identification semblable de l’organisme approbateur, qui est fixé :

a) soit sur l’équipement ou l’équipement de protection individuelle;

b) soit sur l’emballage accompagnant l’équipement ou l’équipement de protection individuelle.

Section 24 Entretien et réparation de l’équipement

24. (1) L’employeur s’assure que l’équipement est entretenu à intervalles suffisamment rapprochés pour en assurer le fonctionnement en toute sécurité.

(2) Si l’équipement s’avère défectueux, l’employeur s’assure que, dans les meilleurs délais :

a) des mesures sont prises, jusqu’à ce que le défaut soit corrigé, pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs susceptibles d’être exposés au danger;

b) soit le défaut est corrigé par un travailleur compétent, soit l’équipement est remplacé.

(3) Le travailleur qui sait ou a des raisons de croire que l’équipement dont il est responsable présente un danger doit, dans les meilleurs délais :

a) faire rapport à l’employeur sur l’état de l’équipement;

b) réparer l’équipement, s’il y est autorisé et s’il a la compétence voulue, ou remplacer l’équipement ou le mettre hors service.

Section 25 Chaudières et appareils à pression

25. L’employeur s’assure que les chaudières et appareils à pression utilisés au lieu de travail ont eté convenablement fabriqués et sont convenablement entretenus, même si la Loi sur les chaudières et appareils à pression n’exige pas qu’ils soient inspectés ou enregistrés.

Section 26 Interdiction d’utiliser de l’air comprimé

26. L’employeur s’assure que de l’air comprimé ne sera pas dirigé vers les travailleurs :

a) aux fins du nettoyage de vêtements ou de d’équipements de protection individuelle;

b) à quelque autre fin si l’utilisation d’air comprimé est susceptible d’entraîner la dispersion dans l’air de contaminants qui pourraient être nocifs aux travailleurs.

Section 27 Inspection des lieux de travail

27. (1) L’employeur permet aux membres du Comité ou à un représentant d’inspecter le lieu de travail aux intervalles raisonnables fixés par le Comité et l’employeur ou par le représentant et l’employeur.

(2) Le plus tôt possible après la réception d’un avis écrit du Comité ou d’un représentant faisant état d’une situation dangereuse ou d’une violation de la Loi ou du présent règlement, l’employeur :

a) prend des mesures, jusqu’à ce qu’il soit remédié à la situation dangereuse ou qu’il ait été mis fin à la violation, pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs susceptibles d’être exposés au danger;

b) prend les mesures voulues pour remédier à la situation dangereuse ou à la violation;

c) informe le Comité ou un représentant par écrit :

(i) soit des mesures qu’il a prises ou qu’il prendra conformément aux alinéas a) et b),

(ii) soit, s’il n’a pas pris les mesures exigées par les alinéas a) et b), des motifs de son inaction.

Section 28 Enquête relative à certains accidents

28. (1) Sous réserve de l’article 29, l’employeur s’assure que tout accident causant des lésions corporelles graves ou tout événement dangereux fait le plus tôt possible l’objet d’une enquête menée :

a) par le Comité et l’employeur ou par le représentant et l’employeur;

b) par l’employeur lorsque le Comité ni aucun représentant n’est disponible.

(2) Après l’enquête visée au paragraphe (1), l’employeur, en consultation avec le Comité ou un représentant ou, si le Comité ni aucun représentant n’est disponible, avec les travailleurs, établit un rapport écrit comprenant ce qui suit :

a) une description de l’accident ou de l’événement;

b) des illustrations, photographies, vidéos ou autres éléments de preuve susceptibles de faciliter la détermination des causes de l’accident ou de l’événement;

c) l’identification des situations dangeureuses, actes, omissions ou procédures qui ont contribué à l’accident ou à l’événement;

d) une explication quant aux causes de l’accident ou de l’événement;

e) une description des mesures correctives prises sur-le-champ;

f) une description des mesures à long terme qui seront prises pour éviter que pareil accident ou événement dangereux ne se reproduise, ou les raisons pour lesquelles des mesures n’ont pas été prises.

Section 29 Maintien en l’état de la scène d’un accident ayant causé la mort

29. (1) Sauf si un texte législatif ou le paragraphe (2) ne l’autorise expressément, nul ne doit, si ce n’est pour sauver une vie ou soulager la souffrance humaine, perturber, détruire, déplacer ou emporter des débris, de l’équipement, des articles, des documents ou toutes autres choses soit sur la scène d’un accident ayant causé la mort soit qui est relié à l’accident, jusqu’à ce qu’un agent de sécurité ait mené une enquête sur les circonstances de l’accident.

(2) S’il survient un accident causant la mort et que l’agent de sécurité ne soit pas en mesure de compléter une enquête sur les circonstances de l’accident, l’agent peut, sauf si la loi le lui interdit, donner la permission de déplacer les débris, l’équipement, les articles, les documents ou autres choses visés au paragraphe (1), dans la mesure nécessaire pour permettre la poursuite des travaux, s’il est convaincu :

a) d’une part, que des éléments de preuve, notamment des illustrations, photographies, vidéos, fournissant des détails sur le lieu de l’accident ont été recueillis avant que la permission ne soit accordée;

b) d’autre part, qu’un membre du Comité ou le représentant, s’il y en a un de disponible, a inspecté les lieux de l’accident et convenu que les objets pouvaient être déplacés.

Section 30 Blessures nécessitant un traitement médical

30. L’employeur :

a) fait rapport au Comité ou à un représentant de toute blessure entraînant un arrêt de travail subie par un travailleur au lieu de travail et nécessitant un traitement médical;

b) donne au Comité ou à un représentant ou, si le Comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, aux travailleurs, l’occasion raisonnable d’examiner le rapport sur la blessure entraînant un arrêt de travail pendant les heures de travail normales et sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

Section 31 Travail en cas de visibilité réduite

31. Si la visibilité est, dans un secteur du lieu de travail, réduite en raison de la fumée, de la vapeur ou de la présence de toute autre substance et que cela met en danger tout travailleur, l’employeur n’autorise le travailleur à travailler dans ce secteur que s’il lui fournit un moyen de communication efficace avec un autre travailleur qui est facilement disponible pour lui prêter assistance en cas d’urgence.

Section 32 Travail sur une étendue d’eau englacée

32. (1) Le présent article ne s’applique pas :

a) aux routes construites et entretenues par le ministère des Transports;

b) aux chemins construits et entretenus conformément à une norme approuvée.

(2) Avant d’obliger ou d’autoriser un travailleur à travailler ou à se déplacer sur de la glace qui recouvre une étendue d’eau ou une autre matière dans laquelle le travailleur pourrait s’enfoncer de plus de 1 m, l’employeur fait vérifier l’épaisseur de la glace pour s’assurer que celle-ci peut supporter la charge qui y sera appliquée en raison du travail ou du déplacement.

(3) L’agent de sécurité en chef peut lever l’exigence prévue au paragraphe (1) si l’employeur ou le travailleur le convainc que d’autres mesures ont été prises pour éliminer ou réduire les risques auxquels le travailleur s’exposerait si la glace ne pouvait supporter la charge.

Section 33 Travail effectué seul ou dans un lieu isolé

33. (1) Dans le présent article, «travailler seul» se dit du fait de travailler comme seul travailleur dans un lieu de travail, dans des circonstances où il est impossible d’obtenir rapidement de l’aide en cas de blessure, de problème de santé ou d’urgence.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur travaille seul ou dans un lieu de travail isolé ou qui l’y autorise, en consultation avec le Comité ou un représentant ou, si le Comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, avec le travailleur et d’autres travailleurs, relève les dangers découlant des conditions et du milieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur prend des mesures raisonnables pour éliminer ou réduire les risques que présentent les dangers relevés conformément au paragraphe (2), notamment en créant un système de communication efficace qui repose, selon le cas :

a) sur des communications radio;

b) sur des communications par téléphone conventionnel ou par téléphone cellulaire;

c) sur tout autre moyen de communication efficace compte tenu des risques.

Section 34 Harcèlement

34. (1) Dans le présent article, «harcèlement» s’entend, sous réserve des paragraphes (2) et (3), de remarques ou de gestes vexatoires sur le lieu de travail :

a) d’une part, lorsque l’on sait ou que l’on devrait raisonnablement savoir que ces remarques ou ces gestes sont importuns;

b) d’autre part, lorsque ces remarques ou ces gestes constituent au lieu de travail une menace à la santé ou à la sécurité d’un travailleur.

(2) Il y a harcèlement pour l’application du paragraphe (1) si l’existence d’un des éléments suivants est établie :

a) une conduite, des propos, des démonstrations, des actes ou des gestes répétés;

b) une seule occurrence grave d’une conduite ou un propos, une démonstration, un acte ou un geste isolé et grave ayant des conséquences durables et préjudiciables à la santé ou à la sécurité du travailleur.

(3) La définition de «harcèlement» figurant au paragraphe (1) ne vise par les mesures raisonnables prises par l’employeur ou le superviseur relativement à la gestion et à la direction des travailleurs ou du lieu de travail.

(4) L’employeur, en consultation avec le Comité ou un représentant ou, si le Comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, avec les travailleurs, élabore et met en œuvre une politique écrite qui comprend les éléments suivants :

a) une définition de harcèlement qui est compatible avec les paragraphes (1), (2) et (3);

b) un énoncé portant que tout travailleur a le droit de travailler dans un lieu de travail exempt de harcèlement;

c) la mention du fait que l’employeur s’engage à déployer tous les efforts raisonnables pour s’assurer que les travailleurs ne font pas l’objet de harcèlement;

d) la mention du fait que l’employeur s’engage à prendre des mesures correctives à l’égard de tout travailleur qui harcèle un autre travailleur;

e) une indication de la façon dont les plaintes pour harcèlement peuvent être portées à l’attention de l’employeur;

f) un énoncé portant que l’employeur ne divulguera à quiconque le nom d’un plaignant ou d’un présumé harceleur, ni les circonstances de la plainte, sauf si la divulgation :

(i) soit est nécessaire aux fins de la tenue d’une enquête sur la plainte ou de la prise de mesures correctives au regard de la plainte,

(ii) soit est exigée par la loi;

g) une description de la procédure que l’employeur suivra pour informer le plaignant et le présumé harceleur des résultats de l’enquête;

h) un énoncé portant que la politique de l’employeur en matière de harcèlement ne vise aucunement à décourager ou à empêcher le plaignant d’exercer les autres droits reconnus par la loi.

(5) L’employeur fait en sorte que des copies de la politique exigée par le paragraphe (4) soient facilement accessibles aux travailleurs.

Section 35 Violence

35. (1) Dans le présent article, le terme «violence» vise toute tentative d’acte ou menace d’acte ou tout acte réel de la part d’un particulier, qui cause ou est susceptible de causer un préjudice corporel, tel qu’une déclaration ou un comportement menaçant qui donne à un travailleur des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’il risque de subir un préjudice corporel.

(2) Pour l’application du présent article, les lieux de travail où l’on peut raisonnablement s’attendre à ce que de la violence survienne sont notamment ceux qui offrent les services ou activités suivants :

a) services fournis par les établissements de soins de santé au sens de l’article 463;

b) services d’exécution d’ordonnances médicales;

c) services éducatifs;

d) services policiers;

e) services correctionnels;

f) autres services d’application de la loi;

g) services de sécurité;

h) services d’intervention et de counselling en cas de crise;

i) services financiers;

j) vente de boissons alcoolisées ou fourniture de locaux aux fins de consommation de boissons alcoolisées;

k) services de taxi;

l) services de transport.

(3) Lorsqu’un acte de violence est survenu ou risque vraisemblablement de survenir au lieu de travail, l’employeur, après avoir consulté le Comité ou un représentant ou, si le Comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, les travailleurs, élabore et met en œuvre une politique écrite traitant de la violence éventuelle sur le lieu de travail.

(4) La politique exigée au paragraphe (3) doit être établie par écrit et comprendre ce qui suit :

a) un énoncé portant que l’employeur s’engage à éliminer ou à réduire les risques de violence au lieu de travail;

b) la désignation du ou des lieux de travail où un acte de violence est survenu ou risque vraisemblablement de survenir;

c) la mention des postes dont les titulaires ont été ou risquent vraisemblablement d’être exposés à de la violence au lieu de travail;

d) la procédure que suivra l’employeur pour informer les travailleurs de la nature et de l’étendue des risques de violence, notamment la communication des renseignements que l’employeur possède au sujet des risques de violence associés aux personnes qui ont des antécédents de comportement violent et que les travailleurs sont susceptibles de cotoyer dans le cadre de leur travail, sauf si la loi interdit la communication de tels renseignements;

e) les mesures que l’employeur prendra afin d’éliminer ou de réduire les risques de violence, notamment l’utilisation d’équipment de protection individuelle, et les arrangements administratifs et les contrôles d’ingénierie;

f) la procédure que le travailleur exposé à la violence doit suivre pour signaler l’incident à l’employeur;

g) la procédure que suivra l’employeur pour documenter les actes de violence qui lui ont été signalés conformément à l’alinéa f) et pour effectuer une enquête à cet égard;

h) la recommendation que tout travailleur exposé à des actes de violence consulte son médecin aux fins soit de traitement soit d’aiguillage vers du counselling après incident;

i) l’engagement de l’employeur de fournir aux travailleurs des programmes de formation portant notamment sur les éléments suivants :

(i) les façons de reconnaître les situations susceptibles d’engendrer de la violence,

(ii) les procédures, méthodes de travail, arrangements administratifs et contrôles d’ingénierie visant à éliminer ou à réduire les risques de violence à l’endroit des travailleurs,

(iii) les comportements appropriés des travailleurs exposés à la violence, notamment la façon d’obtenir de l’aide,

(iv) la procédure à suivre pour signaler des actes de violence.

(5) Si un travailleur reçoit le traitement ou le counselling visés à l’alinéa (4)h) ou suit le programme de formation visé à l’alinéa (4)i), l’employeur s’assure que le temps que le travailleur consacre aux activités liées au traitement ou au counselling ou à la formation est considéré comme du temps passé au travail et veille à ce que le travailleur ne perde aucun salaire ni avantage.

(6) L’employeur fait en sorte que des copies de la politique exigée au paragraphe (3) soient facilement accessibles aux travailleurs.

(7) L’employeur s’assure que la politique exigée au paragraphe (3) est réexaminée et, au besoin, modifiée au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

Section 36 Établissement de vente au détail de nuit

36. (1) Dans le présent article, «établissement de vente au détail de nuit» s’entend d’un lieu de travail qui fait de la vente au détail aux clients et auquel le public a accès de 23 h à 6 h.

(2) L’employeur de travailleurs travaillant dans un établissement de vente au détail de nuit :

a) procède à une évaluation des risques au lieu de travail conformément à une norme de l’industrie approuvée;

b) réexamine et, au besoin, modifie l’évaluation des risques au lieu de travail au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) L’employeur de travailleurs travaillant dans un établissement de vente au détail de nuit met en place les mesures de sécurité suivante :

a) l’établissement d’une procédure écrite sur la manipulation sécuritaire de l’argent liquide, qui a pour objet de réduire au minimum les montants facilement accessibles aux travailleurs dans l’établissement;

b) l’utilisation de caméras vidéo qui filment les endroits importants du lieu de travail, notamment les caisses et les pompes à essence, s’il en est;

c) la mise en place de mesures visant à assurer une bonne visibilité à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur des locaux;

d) l’installation de panneaux indiquant :

(i) que les travailleurs ont un accès restreint à de l’argent liquide et à des objets de valeur,

(ii) que l’établissement est muni de caméras vidéo.

(4) L’employeur de travailleurs travaillant dans un établissement de vente au détail de nuit entre 23 h et 6 h :

a) met en place un système de contrôle à l’arrivée et au départ des travailleurs et fournit aux travailleurs une procédure écrite y relative;

b) fournit un transmetteur d’urgence personnel que les travailleurs doivent porter et qui, lorsqu’il est activé, réclame une intervention d’urgence.

Part 26 RISQUES D’INCENDIE ET D’EXPLOSION

Section 394 Plan de sécurité incendie

394. (1) L’employeur :

a) prend des mesures raisonnables pour prévenir les incendies sur le lieu de travail et assurer une protection efficace des travailleurs contre tout incendie susceptible de survenir;

b) rédige et applique un plan de sécurité incendie qui assure la sécurité des travailleurs en cas d’incendie.

(2) Tout plan de sécurité incendie élaboré conformément au paragraphe (1) doit comprendre :

a) des protocoles d’urgence à appliquer en cas d’incendie, notamment :

(i) le déclenchement d’une alarme sonore,

(ii) la notification du service des incendies,

(iii) l’évacuation des travailleurs en danger, et des dispositions particulières pour l’évacuation des travailleurs handicapés;

b) les quantités, les lieux d’entreposage et les méthodes d’entreposage des substances inflammables présentes sur le lieu de travail;

c) des dispositions permettant de désigner des personnes pour l’application du plan et de définir leurs tâches;

d) des dispositions établissant la formation que doivent avoir reçue les personnes désignées conformément à l’alinéa c) et les travailleurs en général relativement à leurs responsabilités en matière de sécurité incendie;

e) des dispositions indiquant à quel moment ont lieu les exercices d’évacuation en cas d’incendie;

f) des dispositions définissant les méthodes de contrôle des risques d’incendie.

(3) L’employeur s’assure :

a) que les personnes désignées conformément à l’alinéa (2)c) et les travailleurs auxquels on a assigné des tâches liées à la sécurité incendie obtiennent une formation convenable relativement au plan de sécurité incendie et l’appliquent;

b) que le plan de sécurité incendie est affiché à un endroit bien visible pour que les travailleurs puissent le consulter;

c) qu’un exercice d’évacuation en cas d’incendie a lieu au moins une fois l’ an.

Section 395 Extincteurs

395. (1) L’employeur s’assure que les extincteurs portatifs sont sélectionnés, situés, inspectés, entretenus et vérifiés de manière que la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs soient préservées sur le lieu de travail.

(2) L’employeur s’assure que des extincteurs portatifs sont placés à 9 m ou moins :

a) de tout dispositif de chauffage portatif industriel à flamme nue et de toute chaudière à goudron ou à asphalte qu’on utilise;

b) d’une activité de soudage ou de taillage en cours.

Part 5 PREMIERS SOINS

Section 54 Interprétation

54. Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent à la présente partie.

«éloigné» Se dit d’un lieu de travail étant au moins à 30 minutes mais au plus à deux heures de trajet d’un hôpital ou d’une installation médicale, dans des conditions normales de voyage et par les modes de transport disponibles.

«installation médicale» Clinique médicale ou cabinet médical où un professionnel de la santé est disponible à bref délai.

«rapproché» Se dit d’un lieu de travail étant au plus à 30 minutes de trajet d’un hôpital ou d’une installation médicale, dans des conditions normales de voyage et par les modes de transport disponibles. (close)

Section 55 Application

55. La présente partie ne s’applique pas à ce qui suit :

a) un hôpital, une clinique médicale, le cabinet d’un professionnel de la santé, une maison de soins infirmiers ou un autre établissement de soins de santé au sens de l’article 463, où un professionnel de la santé est disponible à bref délai;

b) un lieu de travail rapproché où le travail effectué est entièrement de nature administrative, professionnelle ou cléricale qui ne nécessite pas d’effort physique important ou d’exposition à des conditions, méthodes de travail ou substances éventuellement dangereuses.

Section 56 Prestation des premiers soins

56. Sous réserve de l’article 57, l’employeur :

a) fournit les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel, les installations et le transport exigés par la présente partie pour donner des premiers soins rapides et appropriés aux travailleurs dans un lieu de travail;

b) examine les dispositions de la présente partie en collaboration avec le Comité ou un représentant ou, si le Comité ou un ou représentant n’est pas disponible, avec les travailleurs;

c) si les dispositions de la présente partie ne sont pas adéquates pour répondre à un danger particulier dans un lieu de travail, fournit les secouristes, les fournitures, le m a tériel et l e s installations supplémentaires qui sont adaptés au danger;

d) lorsqu’un travailleur pourrait être emprisonné ou frappé d’incapacité dans une situation susceptible d’être dangereuse pour une personne qui participe à l’opération de sauvetage, s’assure que :

(i) d’une part, une procédure écrite efficace est établie pour le sauvetage du travailleur,

(ii) d’autre part, des secouristes et un matériel de sauvetage convenables sont fournis.

Section 57 Multiples employeurs

57. (1) S’il y a de multiples employeurs dans un lieu de travail :

a) soit les employeurs peuvent convenir par écrit de fournir collectivement les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel, les installations et le transport pour les travailleurs blessés qui sont exigés par la présente partie;

b) soit un agent de sécurité peut obliger les employeurs à fournir collectivement les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel, les installations et le transport pour les travailleurs blessés qui sont exigés par la présente partie.

(2) Si le paragraphe (1) s’applique, le nombre total de travailleurs de tous les employeurs dans le lieu de travail est réputé le nombre de travailleurs dans le lieu de travail. Secouristes

Section 58 Secouristes

58. (1) L’employeur fournit les secouristes et fournitures indiqués en résumé à l’annexe G :

a) d’une part, pour la distance entre le lieu de travail et l’installation médicale la plus proche;

b) d’autre part, pour le nombre de travailleurs se trouvant à tout moment dans le lieu de travail.

(2) L’employeur s’assure que tout secouriste exigé par le présent règlement possède, selon le cas :

a) la qualification de niveau 1 indiquée à l’annexe A;

b) la qualification de niveau 2 indiquée à l’annexe B.

(3) Si le présent règlement exige qu’un personnel de sauvetage soit fourni dans un lieu de travail, l’employeur s’assure qu’au moins un secouriste titulaire d’une qualification de niveau 1 est disponible à bref délai pendant les heures de travail, en sus de ce qui est exigé au paragraphe (1).

(4) Malgré toute autre disposition de la présente partie, l’employeur qui fournit un logement aux travailleurs dans un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé ou à proximité de celui-ci fournit les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel et les installations indiqués aux annexes G, H, I et J en fonction du nombre total de travailleurs dans le lieu de travail ou à proximité de celui-ci, que les travailleurs soient ou non tous au travail à un moment donné.

(5) L’employeur :

a) permet au secouriste, ainsi qu’à tout autre travailleur dont l’aide est requise par le secouriste, de donner des premiers soins rapides et adéquats à un travailleur qui a été blessé ou est tombé malade;

b) s’assure que le secouriste et tout autre travailleur qui l’aide disposent d’un temps adéquat pour donner les premiers soins, sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

Section 59 Certificats

59. (1) Un certificat délivré par un organisme agréé n’est pas valide pour l’application de la présente partie, sauf s’il précise un niveau de qualification et une date d’expiration.

(2) Le certificat visé au paragraphe (1) doit indiquer une date d’expiration qui ne tombe pas plus de trois ans après sa date de délivrance.

Section 60 Poste de premiers soins

60. (1) Dans chaque lieu de travail, l’employeur fournit et maintient un poste de premiers soins facilement accessible qui contient ce qui suit :

a) une trousse de premiers soins contenant les fournitures et le matériel indiqués à l’annexe H;

b) un manuel de premiers soins convenable;

c) toute autre fourniture et tout autre matériel qu’exige le présent règlement.

(2) L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) l’emplacement d’un poste de premiers soins est indiqué de façon claire et évidente;

b) à chaque poste de premiers soins, une procédure d’urgence appropriée est affichée bien en vue et comprend :

(i) d’une part, une liste de numéros de téléphone d’urgence, ainsi que d’autres instructions pour joindre le service d’incendie, de police ou d’ambulance ou l’hôpital le plus proche, ou un autre service approprié,

(ii) d’autre part, toute procédure de sauvetage écrite exigée par le sous-alinéa 56d)(i).

Section 61 Salle de premiers soins

61. S’il est probable qu’il y ait au moins 100 travailleurs au travail dans un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé à un moment donné, l’employeur fournit une salle de premiers soins qui, à la fois :

a) est de taille adéquate, propre et dotée d’un éclairage, d’une ventilation et d’un chauffage adéquats;

b) est dotée :

(i) d’un évier installé en permanence, avec eau chaude et eau froide,

(ii) des fournitures, des documents et du matériel de premiers soins exigés par la présente partie,

(iii) d’un lit pliant ou d’un lit avec oreillers;

c) est à la charge d’un secouriste qui possède les qualifications exigées par la présente partie et qui est facilement disponible pour donner les premiers soins;

d) est utilisée exclusivement pour l’administration des premiers soins.

Section 62 Registre de premiers soins

62. L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) il y a un registre de premiers soins à chaque poste de premiers soins et dans chaque salle de premiers soins;

b) les détails des premiers soins administrés ou des cas renvoyés à un médecin sont enregistrés dans le registre de premiers soins;

c) le registre de premiers soins est facilement disponible en vue de son inspection par le Comité ou un représentant;

d) un registre de premiers soins qui n’est plus utilisé est conservé pour une période d’au moins trois ans après le jour où il a cessé d’être utilisé.

Section 63 Travailleurs transportés

63. L’employeur qui transporte des travailleurs d’un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé à un poste de premiers soins, à une clinique médicale, au cabinet d’un professionnel de la santé, à un hôpital ou à un autre établissement de soins de santé au sens de l’article 463 fournit une trousse de premiers soins qui contient les fournitures et le matériel indiqués à l’annexe H et qui est facilement accessible pour les travailleurs transportés.

Section 64 Fournitures et matériel de premiers soins

64. (1) L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) les fournitures et le matériel de premiers soins sont protégés et maintenus propres et au sec;

b) aucune fourniture, aucun matériel ni aucune matière autres que les fournitures et le matériel de premiers soins ne sont conservés dans la trousse de premiers soins.

(2) Dans un lieu de travail où un secouriste est exigé à l’article 58, l’employeur fournit les fournitures et le matériel supplémentaires indiqués :

a) à l’annexe I, si le secouriste doit posséder une qualification de niveau 1;

b) à l’annexe J, si le secouriste doit posséder une qualification de niveau 2.

(3) Dans un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé, l’employeur fournit et met à la disposition des travailleurs deux couvertures, une civière et des attelles pour les membres supérieurs et inférieurs.

Section 65 Transport des travailleurs blessés

65. (1) L’employeur s’assure de la disponibilité d’un moyen de transport pour les travailleurs blessés vers une installation médicale ou un hôpital.

(2) Les moyens de transport suivants satisfont aux exigences du paragraphe (1) :

a) un service d’ambulance qui prend tout au plus 30 minutes pour se rendre de la base d’ambulance au lieu de travail dans des conditions normales de voyage;

b) un moyen de transport convenable, compte tenu de la distance à parcourir et des dangers auxquels les travailleurs sont exposés, qui offre une protection contre les intempéries et qui est doté, pour autant que ce soit raisonnablement possible, de moyens de communication permettant de communiquer avec l’installation médicale ou l’hôpital vers lequel le travailleur blessé est transporté et avec le lieu de travail.

(3) Si une civière est exigée au paragraphe 64(3), l’employeur s’assure que le moyen de transport fourni conformément à l’alinéa (2)b) peut recevoir et fixer solidement en place une civière occupée.

(4) L’employeur fournit des moyens de communication permettant de faire venir le moyen de transport exigé par le paragraphe (1).

(5) Si un travailleur est gravement blessé ou, de l’avis d’un secouriste, doit être accompagné pendant le transport, l’employeur s’assure qu’il est accompagné par un secouriste pendant le transport.

Section 66 Asphyxie et empoisonnement

66. Si un travailleur est exposé à un risque d’asphyxie ou d’empoisonnement, l’employeur s’assure que des dispositions d’urgence raisonnables sont prises, avant le début du travail, en vue du sauvetage du travailleur, de la fourniture rapide d’antidotes, de mesures de soutien, de premiers soins et de soins médicaux et de la prise de toute autre mesure appropriée pour éliminer ou réduire le risque pour la santé et la sécurité du travailleur.

Section 67 Dispositions supplémentaires

67. Un agent de sécurité peut obliger l’employeur à prendre des mesures supplémentaires, en sus de ce qu’exige la présente partie pour que les dispositions de premiers soins et d’urgence dans un lieu de travail soient adéquates, si, de l’avis de l’agent de sécurité, les dispositions de premiers soins et d’urgence dans un lieu de travail sont inadéquates.

LOI SUR LA SÉCURITÉ
L.R.T.N.-O. 1988, c. S-1

SANTÉ ET SÉCURITÉ

Section 4 Obligations de l'employeur

4. (1) Chaque employeur :

a) exploite son établissement de telle façon que la santé et la sécurité des personnes qui s'y trouvent ne soient vraisemblablement pas mises en danger;

b) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables et applique des méthodes et techniques raisonnables destinées à protéger la santé et la sécurité des personnes présentes dans son établissement;

c) fournit les services de premiers soins visés par les règlements applicables aux établissements de sa catégorie.

(2) Si deux ou plusieurs employeurs sont responsables d’un établissement, l’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y en a pas, le propriétaire de l’établissement, coordonne les activités des employeurs dans l’établissement pour veiller à la santé et la sécurité des personnes dans l’établissement.

[L.T.N.-O. 2003, c. 25, a. 3]

Section 5 Obligations de l'employé

5. Au travail, le travailleur qui est employé dans un établissement ou au service de celui-ci :

a) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables pour assurer sa sécurité et celle des autres personnes présentes dans l'établissement;

b) au besoin, utilise les dispositifs et porte les vêtements ou accessoires de protection que lui fournit son employeur ou que les règlements l'obligent à utiliser ou à porter.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure de ce qui est raisonnablement possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Article 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, l’équipement de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou élaborées conformément au présent règlement.

Article 14 Personnes mineures

14. (1) L’employeur s’assure qu’aucune personne âgée de moins de 16 ans n’est obligée ni autorisée à travailler, selon le cas :

a) sur un chantier de construction;

b) à un procédé de production dans une usine de pâte, une scierie ou une menuiserie;

c) à un procédé de production dans une fonderie ou une affinerie, dans le travail du métal ou dans des activités de fabrication;

d) dans un espace restreint;

e) dans des opérations forestières;

f) à titre d’opérateur de matériel mobile motorisé, de grue ou de monte-charge;

g) si l’exposition à un agent chimique ou biologique est susceptible de mettre en danger la santé ou la sécurité de cette personne;

h) à la construction ou à l’entretien de lignes électriques.

(2) L’employeur s’assure qu’aucune personne âgée de moins de 18 ans n’est obligée ni autorisée à travailler, selon le cas :

a) à titre de travailleur du secteur nucléaire au sens de l’article 339;

b) à des travaux d’amiante au sens de l’article 364;

c) à des travaux de silice au sens de l’article 380;

d) à une activité exigeant l’utilisation d’un appareil respiratoire à alimentation d’air.

Article 15 Obligation de l'entrepreneur principal de fournir des renseignements

15. L’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y a pas d’entrepreneur principal, l’employeur, remet à chaque autre employeur et à chaque travailleur se trouvant sur le lieu de travail un avis écrit indiquant :

a) le nom du particulier qui supervise les travaux pour le compte de l’entrepreneur principal ou de l’employeur;

b) les installations d’urgence qui sont à la disposition des travailleurs;

c) si un comité est créé en vertu de l’article 37, l’existence du comité au lieu de travail et les moyens de communiquer avec le comité;

d) si un représentant est désigné en vertu de l’article 39, l’identité du représentant se trouvant sur le lieu de travail et les moyens de communiquer avec ce dernier.

Article 16 Supervision des travaux

16. (1) L’employeur s’assure que, à tout lieu de travail :

a) les travaux sont supervisés de façon sécuritaire et compétente;

b) les superviseurs ont une connaissance suffisante de ce qui suit :

(i) tout programme de santé et de sécurité au travail applicable aux travailleurs supervisés sur le lieu de travail,

(ii) la manipulation, l’utilisation, l’entreposage, la production et l’élimination en toute sécurité des substances dangereuses,

(iii) la nécessité de disposer d’équipement de protection individuelle et d’utiliser cet équipement de manière sécuritaire,

(iv) les procédures d’urgence exigées par le présent règlement,

(v) toute autre mesure nécessaire pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) les superviseurs ont suivi un programme de familiarisation réglementaire approuvé;

d) les superviseurs se conforment à la Loi et au présent règlement.

(2) Le superviseur s’assure que les travailleurs se conforment à la Loi et au présent règlement dans la mesure où ceux-ci s’appliquent au lieu de travail.

Article 17 Obligation d’informer les travailleurs

17. L’employeur s’assure que les travailleurs :

a) d’une part, ont connaissance des dispositions de la Loi et du présent règlement qui s’appliquent au lieu de travail;

b) d’autre part, se conforment à la Loi et au présent règlement.

Article 18 Formation des travailleurs

18. (1) L’employeur veille à ce que tout travailleur ait obtenu une formation en ce qui a trait aux mesures nécessaires pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs au lieu de travail :

a) d’une part, lorsque le travailleur commence à travailler au lieu de travail;

b) d’autre part, lorsque le travailleur est affecté à une autre activité ou à un autre lieu de travail qui diffère du précédent en ce qui a trait aux dangers, à l’équipement, aux installations ou aux procédures.

(2) La formation exigée au paragraphe (1) doit notamment traiter des questions suivantes :

a) la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, notamment en cas d’incendie;

b) l’emplacement des installations de premiers soins;

c) l’identification des aires dont l’accès est interdit ou restreint;

d) les précautions à prendre en vue de protéger les travailleurs contre les substances dangereuses;

e) les procédures, plans, politiques et programmes applicables aux travaux dans le lieu de travail;

f) toute autre mesure nécessaire pour préserver la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs sur le lieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur s’assure que le temps que les travailleurs consacrent à la formation exigée par le paragraphe (1) est considéré comme du temps passé au travail et veille à ce que les travailleurs ne perdent aucun salaire ni avantage en conséquence.

(4) L’employeur s’assure qu’aucun travailleur n’est obligé ni autorisé à travailler sauf si le travailleur, selon le cas :

a) est un travailleur compétent;

b) fait l’objet d’une supervision étroite exercée avec compétence.

Article 19 Communication entre les travailleurs et les agents de sécurité

19. (1) Lorsqu’un agent de sécurité effectue une inspection ou une enquête sur le lieu de travail, l’employeur permet à l’une quelconque des personnes suivantes d’accompagner l’agent :

a) un membre du comité qui, en vertu de l’alinéa 38a), représente les travailleurs ou, si un tel membre n’est pas disponible, un travailleur désigné pour représenter les travailleurs par le comité;

b) le représentant ou, s’il n’est pas disponible, un travailleur désigné pour représenter les travailleurs par le représentant;

c) si aucun membre du comité ou représentant n’est disponible, un travailleur désigné par le syndicat représentant les travailleurs ou, si les travailleurs ne sont pas représentés par un syndicat, un travailleur désigné par un agent de sécurité.

(2) L’employeur permet à tous les travailleurs de consulter l’agent de sécurité effectuant une inspection ou une enquête sur le lieu de travail.

(3) L’employeur s’assure que le temps pendant lequel les travailleurs consultent ou accompagnent l’agent de sécurité est considéré comme du temps passé au travail et veille à ce que les travailleurs ne perdent aucun salaire ni avantage.

Article 20 Contrôle biologique

20. (1) Dans le présent article, « contrôle biologique » s’entend du fait de mesurer, par voie d’évaluation d’échantillons de matériel biologique recueillis d’un travailleur, l’exposition totale du travailleur à une substance dangereuse présente dans le lieu de travail.

(2) Si un travailleur fait l’objet d’un contrôle biologique, l’employeur s’assure que :

a) le travailleur est informé de l’objet et des résultats du contrôle biologique;

b) à la demande du travailleur, les résultats détaillés du contrôle biologique sont mis à la disposition d’un professionnel de la santé, ou d’une personne ayant un statut équivalent en vertu d’un texte législatif d’un ressort autre que le Nunavut, que le travailleur désigne;

c) les résultats d’ensemble du contrôle biologique sont remis au comité ou au représentant.

(3) Les résultats du contrôle biologique visé au paragraphe (2) sont réputés des renseignements personnels de nature médicale visés au paragraphe 10(1).

Article 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers, des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) d’une part, le comité ou un représentant;

b) d’autre part, les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé en vertu du présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

Article 22 Inspection des établissements

22. (1) L’employeur fait en sorte que les établissements soient régulièrement inspectés afin de s’assurer que, dans la mesure de ce qui est raisonnablement possible, ils sont capables :

a) d’une part, de soutenir les pressions qui sont susceptibles de leur être imposées;

b) d’autre part, de réaliser en toute sécurité les travaux pour lesquels ils sont utilisés.

(2) L’employeur corrige dès que cela est raisonnablement possible, toute situation dangereuse relevée dans un établissement et, dans l’intervalle, prend des mesures raisonnables pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs susceptibles d’être exposés au danger.

Article 23 Marque d’identification de l'équipement approuvé

23. (1) Le présent article s’applique à l’équipement et à l’équipement de protection individuelle qui doivent être approuvés par un organisme en application du présent règlement.

(2) L’employeur ou le fournisseur s’assure que l’approbation de l’équipement et de l’équipement de protection individuelle prévue au paragraphe (1) est étayée par le sceau, timbre, logo ou toute autre marque d’identification semblable de l’organisme indiquant l’approbation, qui est apposé :

a) soit sur l’équipement ou l’équipement de protection individuelle;

b) soit sur l’emballage accompagnant l’équipement ou l’équipement de protection individuelle.

Article 24 Entretien et réparation de l'équipement

24. (1) L’employeur s’assure que l’équipement est entretenu à intervalles suffisamment rapprochés pour en assurer le fonctionnement en toute sécurité.

(2) Si l’équipement s’avère défectueux, l’employeur s’assure que dès que cela est raisonnablement possible :

a) d’une part, des mesures sont prises, jusqu’à ce que le défaut soit corrigé, pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs susceptibles d’être exposés au danger;

b) d’autre part, soit le défaut est corrigé par un travailleur compétent, soit l’équipement est remplacé.

(3) Le travailleur qui sait ou a des raisons de croire que l’équipement dont il est responsable présente un danger doit, dès que cela est raisonnablement possible :

a) d’une part, faire rapport à l’employeur sur l’état de l’équipement;

b) d’autre part, réparer l’équipement, s’il y est autorisé et s’il a la compétence voulue, ou remplacer l’équipement ou le mettre hors service.

Article 25 Chaudières et appareils à pression

25. L’employeur s’assure que les chaudières et appareils à pression utilisés au lieu de travail ont été convenablement fabriqués et sont convenablement entretenus, même si la Loi sur les chaudières et appareils à pression n’exige pas qu’ils soient inspectés ou enregistrés.

Article 26 Utilisations interdites de l'air comprimé

26. L’employeur s’assure que de l’air comprimé n’est pas dirigé vers les travailleurs :

a) aux fins du nettoyage de vêtements ou d’équipements de protection individuelle;

b) à quelque autre fin si l’utilisation d’air comprimé est susceptible d’entraîner la dispersion dans l’air de contaminants qui pourraient être nocifs aux travailleurs.

Article 27 Inspection des lieux de travail

27. (1) L’employeur permet aux membres du comité ou à un représentant d’inspecter le lieu de travail aux intervalles raisonnables fixés par le comité et l’employeur ou par le représentant et l’employeur.

(2) Dès que cela est raisonnablement possible après la réception d’un avis écrit du comité ou d’un représentant faisant état d’une situation dangereuse ou d’une violation de la Loi ou du présent règlement, l’employeur :

a) prend des mesures, jusqu’à ce qu’il soit remédié à la situation dangereuse ou qu’il ait été mis fin à la violation, pour protéger la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs susceptibles d’être exposés au danger;

b) prend les mesures voulues pour remédier à la situation dangereuse ou à la violation;

c) informe le comité ou un représentant par écrit :

(i) soit des mesures qu’il a prises ou qu’il prendra conformément aux alinéas a) et b),

(ii) soit, s’il n’a pas pris les mesures exigées par les alinéas a) et b), des motifs de son inaction.

Article 28 Enquête relative à certains accidents

28. (1) Sous réserve de l’article 29, l’employeur s’assure que tout accident causant des lésions corporelles graves ou tout événement dangereux fait, dès que cela est raisonnablement possible, l’objet d’une enquête menée :

a) par le comité et l’employeur ou par le représentant et l’employeur;

b) par l’employeur lorsque le comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible.

(2) Après l’enquête relative à un accident causant des lésions corporelles graves ou à un événement dangereux, l’employeur, en consultation avec le comité ou un représentant ou, si le comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, avec les travailleurs, établit un rapport écrit comprenant ce qui suit :

a) une description de l’accident ou de l’événement;

b) des illustrations, photographies, vidéos ou autres éléments de preuve susceptibles de faciliter la détermination des causes de l’accident ou de l’événement;

c) l’identification des situations dangereuses, actes, omissions ou procédures qui ont contribué à l’accident ou à l’événement;

d) une explication quant aux causes de l’accident ou de l’événement;

e) une description des mesures correctives prises sur-le-champ;

f) une description des mesures à long terme qui seront prises pour éviter que pareil accident ou événement dangereux ne se reproduise, ou les raisons pour lesquelles des mesures n’ont pas été prises.

Article 29 Maintien en l'état de la scène d'un accident ayant causé la mort

29. (1) Sauf si une loi ou le paragraphe (2) ne l’autorise expressément, nul ne doit, si ce n’est pour sauver une vie ou soulager la souffrance humaine, perturber, détruire, déplacer ou emporter des débris, de l’équipement, des articles, des documents ou d’autres choses se trouvant sur la scène d’un accident ayant causé la mort ou qui y est relié , jusqu’à ce qu’un agent de sécurité ait mené une enquête sur les circonstances de l’accident.

(2) S’il survient un accident causant la mort et que l’agent de sécurité ne soit pas en mesure de mener une enquête sur les circonstances de l’accident, l’agent peut, sauf si la loi le lui interdit, donner la permission de déplacer les débris, l’équipement, les articles, les documents ou les autres choses se trouvant sur la scène de l’accident ou reliés à celui-ci, dans la mesure nécessaire pour permettre la poursuite des travaux, s’il est convaincu :

a) d’une part, que des éléments de preuve, notamment des illustrations, photographies ou vidéos, fournissant des détails sur la scène de l’accident ont été recueillis avant que la permission ne soit accordée;

b) d’autre part, qu’un membre du comité ou le représentant, s’il y en a un de disponible, a inspecté les lieux de l’accident et convenu que les choses pouvaient être déplacées.

Article 30 Blessures nécessitant un traitement médical

30. L’employeur :

a) d’une part, fait rapport au comité ou à un représentant de toute blessure entraînant un arrêt de travail subie par un travailleur au lieu de travail et nécessitant un traitement médical;

b) d’autre part, donne au comité ou à un représentant ou, si le comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, aux travailleurs, l’occasion raisonnable d’examiner le rapport sur la blessure entraînant un arrêt de travail pendant les heures de travail normales et sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

Article 31 Travail en cas de visibilité réduite

31. Si la visibilité est, dans un secteur du lieu de travail, réduite en raison de la fumée, de la vapeur ou de la présence d’une autre substance et que cela met en danger tout travailleur, l’employeur n’oblige ni n’autorise le travailleur à travailler dans ce secteur que s’il lui fournit un moyen de communication efficace avec un autre travailleur qui est facilement disponible pour lui prêter assistance en cas d’urgence.

Article 32 Travail sur une étendue d'eau englacée

32. (1) Le présent article ne s’applique pas :

a) aux routes construites et entretenues par le ministère du Développement économique et des Transports;

b) aux chemins construits et entretenus conformément à une norme approuvée.

(2) Avant d’obliger ou d’autoriser un travailleur à travailler ou à se déplacer sur de la glace qui recouvre une étendue d’eau ou une autre matière dans laquelle le travailleur pourrait s’enfoncer de plus de 1 m, l’employeur fait analyser la glace de la glace pour s’assurer que celle-ci peut supporter la charge qui y sera appliquée en raison du travail ou du déplacement.

(3) L’agent de sécurité en chef peut lever l’exigence prévue au paragraphe (2) si l’employeur ou le travailleur le convainc que d’autres mesures ont été prises pour éliminer ou réduire les risques auxquels le travailleur s’exposerait si la glace ne pouvait supporter la charge.

Article 33 Travail effectué seul ou dans un lieu de travail isolé

33. (1) Dans le présent article, « travailler seul » s’entend du fait de travailler comme seul travailleur dans un lieu de travail, dans des circonstances où il est impossible d’obtenir rapidement de l’aide en cas de blessure, de problème de santé ou d’urgence.

(2) L’employeur qui oblige ou autorise un travailleur à travailler seul ou dans un lieu de travail isolé, en consultation avec le comité ou un représentant ou, si le comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, avec le travailleur et d’autres travailleurs, relève les dangers découlant des conditions et des circonstances relatives au travail.

(3) L’employeur prend des mesures raisonnables pour éliminer ou réduire les risques que présentent les dangers relevés conformément au paragraphe (2), notamment en créant un système de communication efficace qui repose, selon le cas :

a) sur des communications radio;

b) sur des communications par téléphone conventionnel ou par téléphone cellulaire;

c) sur tout autre moyen de communication efficace compte tenu des risques.

Article 34 Harcèlement

34. (1) Dans le présent article, « harcèlement » s’entend, sous réserve des paragraphes (2) et (3), de propos ou de conduites vexatoires sur le lieu de travail :

a) d’une part, lorsque l’on sait ou que l’on devrait raisonnablement savoir que ces propos ou ces conduites sont importuns;

b) d’autre part, lorsque ces propos ou ces conduites constituent, au lieu de travail, une menace à la santé ou à la sécurité d’un travailleur.

(2) Pour qu’il y ait harcèlement aux fins du paragraphe (1), l’un quelconque des éléments suivants doit s’être produit :

a) une conduite, des propos, des démonstrations, des actes ou des gestes répétés;

b) une seule occurrence grave d’une conduite, ou un propos, une démonstration, un acte ou un geste isolé et grave, ayant des conséquences durables et préjudiciables à la santé ou à la sécurité du travailleur.

(3) La définition de « harcèlement » figurant au paragraphe (1) ne vise par les mesures raisonnables prises par l’employeur ou le superviseur relativement à la gestion et à la direction des travailleurs ou du lieu de travail.

(4) L’employeur, en consultation avec le comité ou un représentant ou, si le comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, avec les travailleurs, élabore et met en oeuvre une politique écrite qui comprend les éléments suivants :

a) une définition de harcèlement qui est compatible avec les paragraphes (1), (2) et (3);

b) un énoncé portant que tout travailleur a le droit de travailler dans un lieu de travail exempt de harcèlement;

c) la mention du fait que l’employeur s’engage à déployer tous les efforts raisonnables pour s’assurer que les travailleurs ne font pas l’objet de harcèlement;

d) la mention du fait que l’employeur s’engage à prendre des mesures correctives à l’égard de toute personne qui harcèle un travailleur;

e) une explication de la façon dont les plaintes pour harcèlement peuvent être portées à l’attention de l’employeur;

f) un énoncé portant que l’employeur ne divulguera à quiconque le nom d’un plaignant ou d’un présumé harceleur, ni les circonstances de la plainte, sauf si la divulgation :

(i) soit est nécessaire aux fins de la tenue d’une enquête sur la plainte ou de la prise de mesures correctives au regard de la plainte,

(ii) soit est exigée par la loi;

g) une description de la procédure que l’employeur suivra pour informer le plaignant et le présumé harceleur des résultats de l’enquête;

h) un énoncé portant que la politique de l’employeur en matière de harcèlement ne vise aucunement à décourager ou à empêcher le plaignant d’exercer les autres droits reconnus par la loi.

(5) L’employeur fait en sorte qu’une copie de la politique exigée par le paragraphe (4) soit facilement accessible aux travailleurs.

Article 35 Violence

35. (1) Dans le présent article, « violence » s’entend de toute tentative d’acte ou menace d’acte ou de tout acte réel de la part d’une personne, qui cause ou est susceptible de causer une blessure, tel qu’une déclaration ou un comportement menaçant qui donne à un travailleur des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’il risque de subir une blessure.

(2) Pour l’application du présent article, les lieux de travail où l’on peut raisonnablement s’attendre à ce que de la violence survienne sont notamment ceux qui offrent les services ou activités suivants :

a) services fournis par les établissements de soins de santé au sens de l’article 463;

b) services d’exécution d’ordonnances médicales;

c) services éducatifs;

d) services policiers;

e) services correctionnels;

f) autres services d’application de la loi;

g) services de sécurité;

h) services d’intervention et de counselling en cas de crise;

i) services financiers;

j) vente de boissons alcoolisées ou fourniture de locaux aux fins de consommation de boissons alcoolisées;

k) services de taxi;

l) services de transport en commun.

(3) Lorsqu’un acte de violence est survenu ou risque vraisemblablement de survenir au lieu de travail, l’employeur, après avoir consulté le comité ou un représentant ou, si le comité ou un représentant n’est pas disponible, les travailleurs, élabore et met en oeuvre une politique écrite traitant de la violence éventuelle.

(4) La politique exigée au paragraphe (3) doit être établie par écrit et comprendre ce qui suit :

a) l’engagement de l’employeur à éliminer ou à réduire les risques de violence au lieu de travail;

b) la désignation du ou des lieux de travail où un acte de violence est survenu ou risque vraisemblablement de survenir;

c) la mention des postes dont les titulaires ont été ou risquent vraisemblablement d’être exposés à de la violence au lieu de travail;

d) la procédure que suivra l’employeur pour informer les travailleurs de la nature et de l’étendue des risques de violence, notamment la communication des renseignements que l’employeur possède au sujet des risques de violence associés aux personnes qui ont des antécédents de comportement violent et que les travailleurs sont susceptibles de côtoyer dans le cadre de leur travail, sauf si la loi interdit la communication de tels renseignements;

e) les mesures que l’employeur prendra afin d’éliminer ou de réduire les risques de violence, notamment l’utilisation d’équipement de protection individuelle, les arrangements administratifs et les contrôles d’ingénierie;

f) la procédure que le travailleur exposé à la violence doit suivre pour signaler l’incident à l’employeur;

g) la procédure que suivra l’employeur pour documenter les actes de violence qui lui ont été signalés conformément à l’alinéa f) et pour effectuer une enquête à cet égard;

h) la recommandation que tout travailleur exposé à des actes de violence consulte son médecin aux fins soit de traitement soit d’aiguillage vers du counselling après incident;

i) l’engagement de l’employeur de fournir aux travailleurs des programmes de formation portant notamment sur les éléments suivants :

(i) les façons de reconnaître les situations susceptibles d’engendrer de la violence,

(ii) les procédures, pratiques de travail, arrangements administratifs et contrôles d’ingénierie visant à éliminer ou à réduire les risques de violence à l’endroit des travailleurs,

(iii) les réactions appropriées des travailleurs en cas de violence, notamment la façon d’obtenir de l’aide,

(iv) la procédure à suivre pour signaler des actes de violence.

(5) Si un travailleur reçoit le traitement ou le counselling visés à l’alinéa (4)h) ou suit le programme de formation visé à l’alinéa (4)i), l’employeur s’assure que le temps que le travailleur consacre aux activités liées au traitement, au counselling ou à la formation est considéré comme du temps passé au travail et veille à ce que le travailleur ne perde aucun salaire ni avantage en conséquence.

(6) L’employeur fait en sorte qu’une copie de la politique exigée au paragraphe (3) soit facilement accessible aux travailleurs.

(7) L’employeur s’assure que la politique exigée au paragraphe (3) est examinée et, au besoin, révisée au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

Article 36 Établissement de vente au détail de nuit

36. (1) Dans le présent article, « établissement de vente au détail de nuit » s’entend d’un lieu de travail qui fait de la vente au détail aux clients et auquel le public a accès de 23 h à 6 h.

(2) L’employeur de travailleurs travaillant dans un établissement de vente au détail de nuit :

a) procède à une évaluation des risques au lieu de travail conformément à une norme de l’industrie approuvée;

b) examine et, au besoin, révise l’évaluation des risques au lieu de travail au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) L’employeur de travailleurs travaillant dans un établissement de vente au détail de nuit met en place les mesures de sécurité suivante :

a) l’élaboration d’une procédure écrite sur la manipulation sécuritaire de l’argent liquide, qui a pour objet de réduire au minimum les montants facilement accessibles aux travailleurs dans l’établissement;

b) l’utilisation de caméras vidéo qui filment les endroits importants du lieu de travail, notamment les caisses et les pompes à essence, s’il en est;

c) la mise en place de mesures visant à assurer une bonne visibilité à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur des locaux;

d) l’installation de panneaux indiquant :

(i) que les travailleurs ont un accès restreint à de l’argent liquide et à des objets de valeur,

(ii) que l’établissement est muni de caméras vidéo.

(4) L’employeur de travailleurs travaillant dans un établissement de vente au détail de nuit entre 23 h et 6 h :

a) met en place un système de pointage et une procédure écrite relative au pointage pour les travailleurs;

b) fournit un transmetteur d’urgence personnel que les travailleurs doivent porter et qui, lorsqu’il est activé, réclame une intervention d’urgence.

Partie 26 RISQUES D’INCENDIE ET D’EXPLOSION

Article 394 Plan de sécurité incendie

394. (1) L’employeur :

a) d’une part, prend des mesures raisonnables pour prévenir les incendies sur le lieu de travail et assurer une protection efficace des travailleurs contre tout incendie susceptible de survenir;

b) d’autre part, élabore et applique un plan de sécurité incendie écrit qui assure la sécurité des travailleurs en cas d’incendie.

(2) Tout plan de sécurité incendie élaboré conformément au paragraphe (1) doit comprendre :

a) des protocoles d’urgence à appliquer en cas d’incendie, notamment :

(i) le déclenchement d’une alarme sonore,

(ii) la notification du service des incendies,

(iii) l’évacuation des travailleurs en danger, et des dispositions particulières pour l’évacuation des travailleurs handicapés;

b) les quantités, les lieux d’entreposage et les méthodes d’entreposage des substances inflammables présentes sur le lieu de travail;

c) des dispositions qui désignent des personnes responsables de l’application du plan et définissent leurs tâches;

d) des dispositions établissant la formation que doivent avoir reçue les personnes désignées conformément à l’alinéa c) et les travailleurs en général relativement à leurs responsabilités en matière de sécurité incendie;

e) des dispositions indiquant à quel moment ont lieu les exercices d’évacuation en cas d’incendie;

f) des dispositions définissant les méthodes de contrôle des risques d’incendie.

(3) L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) les personnes désignées conformément à l’alinéa (2)c) et les travailleurs auxquels on a assigné des tâches liées à la sécurité incendie obtiennent une formation convenable relativement au plan de sécurité incendie et l’appliquent;

b) le plan de sécurité incendie est affiché à un endroit bien visible pour que les travailleurs puissent le consulter;

c) un exercice d’évacuation en cas d’incendie a lieu au moins une fois l’an.

Article 395 Extincteurs

395. (1) L’employeur s’assure que les extincteurs portatifs sont sélectionnés, situés, inspectés, entretenus et mis à l’essai de manière que la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs soient protégées sur le lieu de travail.

(2) L’employeur s’assure que des extincteurs portatifs sont placés à 9 m ou moins :

a) d’une part, de tout dispositif de chauffage portatif industriel à flamme nue et de toute chaudière à goudron ou à asphalte qu’on utilise;

b) d’autre part, d’une activité de soudage ou de taillage en cours.

Partie 5 PREMIERS SOINS

Article 54 Définitions

54. Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent à la présente partie.

« éloigné » Se dit d’un lieu de travail étant au moins à 30 minutes mais au plus à deux heures de trajet d’un hôpital ou d’une installation médicale, dans des conditions normales de voyage et par les modes de transport disponibles.

« installation médicale » Clinique médicale ou cabinet médical où un professionnel de la santé est disponible à bref délai.

« rapproché » Se dit d’un lieu de travail étant au plus à 30 minutes de trajet d’un hôpital ou d’une installation médicale, dans des conditions normales de voyage et par les modes de transport disponibles. (close)

Article 55 Application

55. La présente partie ne s’applique pas à ce qui suit :

a) un hôpital, une clinique médicale, le cabinet d’un professionnel de la santé, une maison de soins infirmiers ou un autre établissement de soins de santé au sens de l’article 463, où un professionnel de la santé est disponible à bref délai;

b) un lieu de travail rapproché où le travail effectué est entièrement d’une nature administrative, professionnelle ou cléricale qui ne nécessite pas d’effort physique important ou d’exposition à des conditions, méthodes de travail ou substances éventuellement dangereuses.

Article 56 Prestation des premiers soins

56. Sous réserve de l’article 57, l’employeur :

a) fournit les secouristes, les fournitures, l’équipement, les installations et le transport exigés par la présente partie pour donner des premiers soins rapides et appropriés aux travailleurs dans un lieu de travail;

b) examine les dispositions de la présente partie en collaboration avec le comité ou un représentant ou, si le comité ou un ou représentant n’est pas disponible, avec les travailleurs;

c) si les dispositions de la présente partie ne sont pas adéquates pour répondre à un danger particulier dans un lieu de travail, fournit les secouristes, les fournitures, l’équipement et les installations supplémentaires qui sont adaptés au danger;

d) lorsqu’un travailleur pourrait être emprisonné ou frappé d’incapacité dans une situation susceptible d’être dangereuse pour une personne qui participe à l’opération de sauvetage, s’assure que :

(i) d’une part, une procédure écrite efficace est établie pour le sauvetage du travailleur,

(ii) d’autre part, des secouristes et le matériel de sauvetage convenables sont fournis.

Article 57 Multiples employeurs

57. (1) S’il y a plusieurs employeurs dans un lieu de travail :

a) soit les employeurs peuvent convenir par écrit de fournir collectivement les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel, les installations et le transport pour les travailleurs blessés qui sont exigés par la présente partie;

b) soit un agent de sécurité peut obliger les employeurs à fournir collectivement les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel, les installations et le transport pour les travailleurs blessés qui sont exigés par la présente partie.

(2) Si le paragraphe (1) s’applique, le nombre total de travailleurs de tous les employeurs dans le lieu de travail est réputé le nombre de travailleurs dans le lieu de travail.

Article 58 Secouristes

58. (1) L’employeur fournit les secouristes et fournitures indiqués en résumé à l’annexe G :

a) d’une part, pour la distance entre le lieu de travail et l’installation médicale la plus proche;

b) d’autre part, pour le nombre de travailleurs se trouvant à tout moment dans le lieu de travail.

(2) L’employeur s’assure que tout secouriste exigé par le présent règlement possède, selon le cas :

a) la qualification de niveau 1 indiquée à l’annexe A;

b) la qualification de niveau 2 indiquée à l’annexe B.

(3) Si le présent règlement exige que du personnel de sauvetage soit fourni dans un lieu de travail, l’employeur s’assure qu’au moins un secouriste titulaire d’une qualification de niveau 1 est disponible à bref délai pendant les heures de travail, en sus de ce qui est exigé en vertu du paragraphe (1).

(4) Malgré toute autre disposition de la présente partie, l’employeur qui fournit un logement aux travailleurs dans un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé ou à proximité de celui-ci fournit les secouristes, les fournitures, le matériel et les installations indiqués aux annexes G, H, I et J en fonction du nombre total de travailleurs dans le lieu de travail ou à proximité de celui-ci, que les travailleurs soient ou non tous au travail à un moment donné.

(5) L’employeur :

a) permet au secouriste, ainsi qu’à tout autre travailleur dont l’aide est requise par le secouriste, de donner des premiers soins rapides et adéquats à un travailleur qui a été blessé ou est tombé malade;

b) s’assure que le secouriste et tout autre travailleur qui l’aide disposent d’un temps adéquat pour donner les premiers soins, sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

Article 59 Certificats

59. (1) Un certificat délivré par un organisme approuvé n’est pas valide pour l’application de la présente partie, sauf s’il précise un niveau de qualification et une date d’expiration.

(2) Le certificat visé au paragraphe (1) doit indiquer une date d’expiration qui ne tombe pas plus de trois ans après sa date de délivrance.

Article 60 Poste de premiers soins

60. (1) Dans chaque lieu de travail, l’employeur fournit et maintient un poste de premiers soins facilement accessible qui contient ce qui suit :

a) une trousse de premiers soins contenant les fournitures et le matériel indiqués à l’annexe H;

b) un manuel de premiers soins convenable;

c) toute autre fourniture et tout autre matériel qu’exige le présent règlement.

(2) L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) l’emplacement d’un poste de premiers soins est indiqué de façon claire et évidente;

b) à chaque poste de premiers soins, une procédure d’urgence appropriée est affichée bien en vue et comprend :

(i) d’une part, une liste de numéros de téléphone d’urgence, ainsi que d’autres instructions pour joindre le service d’incendie, de police ou d’ambulance ou l’hôpital le plus proche, ou un autre service approprié,

(ii) d’autre part, toute procédure de sauvetage écrite exigée par le sous-alinéa 56d)(i).

Article 61 Salle de premiers soins

61. S’il est probable qu’il y ait au moins 100 travailleurs au travail dans un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé à un moment donné, l’employeur fournit une salle de premiers soins qui, à la fois :

a) est de taille adéquate, propre et dotée d’un éclairage, d’une ventilation et d’un chauffage adéquats;

b) est dotée :

(i) d’un évier installé en permanence, avec eau chaude et eau froide,

(ii) des fournitures, des documents et du matériel de premiers soins exigés par la présente partie,

(iii) d’un lit pliant ou d’un lit avec oreillers;

c) est dirigé par un secouriste qui possède les qualifications exigées par la présente partie et qui est facilement disponible pour donner les premiers soins;

d) est utilisée exclusivement pour l’administration des premiers soins.

Article 62 Registre de premiers soins

62. L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) il y a un registre de premiers soins à chaque poste de premiers soins et dans chaque salle de premiers soins;

b) les détails des premiers soins administrés ou des cas renvoyés à un médecin sont consignés dans le registre de premiers soins;

c) le registre de premiers soins est facilement disponible en vue de son inspection par le comité ou un représentant;

d) un registre de premiers soins qui n’est plus utilisé est conservé pour une période d’au moins trois ans après le jour où il a cessé d’être utilisé.

Article 63 Travailleurs transportés

63. L’employeur qui transporte des travailleurs d’un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé à un poste de premiers soins, à une clinique médicale, au cabinet d’un professionnel de la santé, à un hôpital ou à un autre établissement de soins de santé au sens de l’article 463 fournit une trousse de premiers soins qui contient les fournitures et le matériel indiqués à l’annexe H et qui est facilement accessible pour les travailleurs transportés.

Article 64 Fournitures et matériel de premiers soins

64. (1) L’employeur s’assure de ce qui suit :

a) les fournitures et le matériel de premiers soins sont protégés et maintenus propres et au sec;

b) aucune fourniture, aucun matériel ni aucune matière autres que les fournitures et le matériel de premiers soins ne sont conservés dans la trousse de premiers soins.

(2) Dans un lieu de travail où un secouriste est exigé à l’article 58, l’employeur fournit les fournitures et le matériel supplémentaires indiqués :

a) à l’annexe I, si le secouriste doit posséder une qualification de niveau 1;

b) à l’annexe J, si le secouriste doit posséder une qualification de niveau 2.

(3) Dans un lieu de travail éloigné ou isolé, l’employeur fournit et met à la disposition des travailleurs deux couvertures, une civière et des attelles pour les membres supérieurs et inférieurs.

Article 65 Transport des travailleurs blessés

65. (1) L’employeur s’assure de la disponibilité d’un moyen de transport pour les travailleurs blessés vers une installation médicale ou un hôpital.

(2) Les moyens de transport suivants satisfont aux exigences du paragraphe (1) :

a) un service d’ambulance qui prend tout au plus 30 minutes pour se rendre de la base d’ambulance au lieu de travail dans des conditions normales de voyage;

b) un moyen de transport convenable, compte tenu de la distance à parcourir et des dangers auxquels les travailleurs sont exposés, qui offre une protection contre les intempéries et qui est doté, pour autant que ce soit raisonnablement possible, de moyens de communication permettant de communiquer avec l’installation médicale ou l’hôpital vers lequel le travailleur blessé est transporté et avec le lieu de travail.

(3) Si une civière est exigée en vertu du paragraphe 64(3), l’employeur s’assure que le moyen de transport fourni conformément à l’alinéa (2)b) peut recevoir et fixer solidement en place une civière occupée.

(4) L’employeur fournit des moyens de communication permettant de faire venir le moyen de transport exigé par le paragraphe (1).

(5) Si un travailleur est gravement blessé ou, de l’avis d’un secouriste, doit être accompagné pendant le transport, l’employeur s’assure qu’il est accompagné par un secouriste pendant le transport.

Article 66 Asphyxie et empoisonnement

66. Si un travailleur est exposé à un risque d’asphyxie ou d’empoisonnement, l’employeur s’assure que des dispositions d’urgence raisonnables sont prises, avant le début du travail, en vue du sauvetage du travailleur, de la fourniture rapide d’antidotes, de mesures de soutien, de premiers soins et de soins médicaux ainsi que de la prise de toute autre mesure appropriée pour éliminer ou réduire le risque pour la santé et la sécurité du travailleur.

Article 67 Dispositions supplémentaires

67. Un agent de sécurité peut obliger l’employeur à prendre des mesures supplémentaires, en sus de ce qu’exige la présente partie, pour que les dispositions de premiers soins et d’urgence dans un lieu de travail soient adéquates, si, à son avis, les dispositions de premiers soins et d’urgence dans un lieu de travail sont inadéquates.

LOI SUR LA SÉCURITÉ
L.R.T.N.-O. 1988, c. S-1

SANTÉ ET SÉCURITÉ

Article 4 Obligations de l’employeur

4. (1) Chaque employeur :

a) exploite son établissement de telle façon que la santé et la sécurité des personnes qui s’y trouvent ne soient vraisemblablement pas mises en danger;

b) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables et applique des méthodes et techniques raisonnables destinées à protéger la santé et la sécurité des personnes présentes dans son établissement;

c) fournit les services de premiers soins visés par les règlements applicables aux établissements de sa catégorie.

(2) Si plusieurs employeurs sont responsables d’un établissement, l’entrepreneur principal ou, s’il n’y en a pas, le propriétaire de l’établissement, coordonne les activités des employeurs dans l’établissement afin de veiller au respect du paragraphe 4(1).

[L.Nun. 2003, c. 25, a. 4]

Article 5 Obligations de l’employé

5. Au travail, le travailleur qui est employé dans un établissement ou au service de celui-ci :

a) prend toutes les précautions raisonnables pour assurer sa sécurité et celle des autres personnes présentes dans l’établissement;

b) au besoin, utilise les dispositifs et porte les vêtements ou accessoires de protection que lui fournit son employeur ou que les règlements l’obligent à utiliser ou à porter.