Home

Thermal Conditions

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

Physical hazards include hazards related to extreme heat and cold. Outdoor workers are commonly exposed to thermal hazards; however, it is important to remember some indoor environments (such as cold storage facilities or processing plants) present similar risks. It is important to identify, assess, and control these hazards.

The approach to minimize the risk is the same hazard assessment process used for any other hazards in the workplace and the hierarchy of controls should be applied as with any other workplace hazard. While outdoor weather conditions are beyond the employer’s control, employers still have a responsibility to protect workers. WSCC has a Code of Practice for Thermal Conditions to assist employers with controls in these environments. While low temperature hazards are the most common in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, heat exposures can also be dangerous to workers. The code of practice outlines potential thermal exposures and control methods for temperature extremes along with case studies, heat and cold stress policies, and weather data.

At indoor worksites, employers are required to maintain conditions in a manner that:

  • is appropriate for the work;
  • protects the health and safety of workers; and
  • provides reasonable comfort for workers.

If the indoor thermal conditions are likely to be a health and safety concern to workers, the employer must have equipment on hand to measure the thermal conditions.

For outdoor environments, or where the conditions are not reasonably possible to control, employers must provide measures to maintain:

  • effective protection for the health and safety of workers;
  • reasonable thermal comfort for workers; and
  • provide suitable clothing and PPE for conditions outside the worker’s normal duties.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 21 Occupational health and safety Program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

Part 6 GENERAL HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

Section 74 Thermal conditions

74. (1) Subject to subsection (3), at an indoor work site, an employer shall provide and maintain thermal conditions, including air temperature, radiant temperature, humidity and air movement, that

(a) are appropriate to the nature of the work performed;

(b) provide effective protection for the health and safety of workers; and

(c) provide reasonable thermal comfort for workers.

(2) If the thermal environment at an indoor work site is likely to be a health or safety concern to workers, an employer shall provide and maintain an appropriate and suitably located instrument for measuring the thermal conditions.

(3) If it is not reasonably possible to control thermal conditions or if work is being performed outdoors, an employer shall provide and maintain measures for

(a) the effective protection of the health and safety of workers; and

(b) the reasonable thermal comfort of workers.

(4) If a worker is required or permitted to work in thermal conditions that are different from those associated with the worker’s normal duties, an employer shall provide and require the worker to use suitable clothing or other personal protective equipment necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 21 Occupational health and safety program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

Part 6 GENERAL HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

Section 74 Thermal conditions

74. (1) Subject to subsection (3), at an indoor work site, an employer shall provide and maintain thermal conditions, including air temperature, radiant temperature, humidity and air movement, that

(a) are appropriate to the nature of the work performed;

(b) provide effective protection for the health and safety of workers; and

(c) provide reasonable thermal comfort for workers.

(2) If the thermal environment at an indoor work site is likely to be a health or safety concern to workers, an employer shall provide and maintain an appropriate and suitably located instrument for measuring the thermal conditions.

(3) If it is not reasonably possible to control thermal conditions or if work is being performed outdoors, an employer shall provide and maintain measures for

(a) the effective protection of the health and safety of workers; and

(b) the reasonable thermal comfort of workers.

(4) If a worker is required or permitted to work in thermal conditions that are different from those associated with the worker’s normal duties, an employer shall provide and require the worker to use suitable clothing or other personal protective equipment necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker.

Accueil

Conditions thermiques

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

Les dangers physiques comprennent les risques liés à la chaleur et au froid extrêmes. Les personnes qui travaillent à l’extérieur sont couramment exposées à des dangers thermiques; toutefois, il est important de se rappeler que certains environnements intérieurs (tels que les entrepôts frigorifiques ou les usines de transformation) présentent des dangers semblables. Il est important de déterminer, d’évaluer et de maîtriser ces dangers.

L’approche visant à minimiser le risque est le même processus d’évaluation des dangers utilisé pour tout autre danger dans le milieu de travail et la hiérarchie des mesures de maîtrise devrait être appliquée comme pour tout autre danger en milieu de travail. Bien que les conditions météorologiques extérieures soient indépendantes de la volonté de l’employeur, les employeurs doivent tout de même protéger les travailleurs. La Commission de la sécurité au travail et de l’indemnisation des travailleurs a un code de pratique intitulé Conditions de chaleur et de froid extrêmes pour aider les employeurs à maîtriser ces environnements. Bien que les dangers liés aux basses températures soient les plus courants dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Nunavut, les expositions à la chaleur peuvent également s’avérer dangereuses pour les travailleurs. Le code de pratique présente les expositions thermiques possibles et les méthodes de contrôle pour les températures extrêmes ainsi que des études de cas, des politiques sur le stress causé par la chaleur et le froid.

Dans les lieux de travail intérieurs, les employeurs doivent préserver les conditions d’une manière qui :

  • est appropriée pour le travail; 
  • protège la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs; 
  • offre un confort raisonnable aux travailleurs.

Si les conditions thermiques intérieures sont susceptibles d’être un risque pour la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs, l’employeur doit avoir à portée de main l’équipement nécessaire pour mesure les conditions thermiques. 

Pour les environnements extérieurs, ou dans les endroits où les conditions ne peuvent pas être raisonnablement maîtrisées, les employeurs doivent prévoir des mesures pour maintenir :

  • une protection efficace de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs; 
  • un confort thermique raisonnable pour les travailleurs;
  • fournir des vêtements adéquats et de l’équipement de protection individuelle pour les conditions qui ne cadrent pas avec les fonctions habituelles des travailleurs. 

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) le Comité ou un représentant;

b) les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé au présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

Part 6 EXIGENCES GÉNÉRALES EN MATIÈRE DE SANTÉ

Section 74 Conditions thermiques

74. (1) Sous réserve du paragraphe (3), dans un lieu de travail intérieur, l’employeur fournit et maintient des conditions thermiques, y compris la température de l’air, la température de rayonnement, l’humidité et le mouvement de l’air, qui :

a) sont adaptées à la nature du travail effectué;

b) protègent efficacement la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) offrent un confort thermique raisonnable aux travailleurs.

(2) Si l’environnement thermique dans un lieu de travail intérieur est susceptible de présenter un risque pour la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs, l’employeur fournit et maintient un instrument approprié et convenablement placé permettant de mesurer les conditions thermiques.

(3) S’il n’est pas raisonnablement possible de contrôler les conditions thermiques, ou si le travail est effectué à l’extérieur, l’employeur met en place et maintient des mesures visant :

a) la protection efficace de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) le confort thermique raisonnable des travailleurs.

(4) Si un travailleur doit ou peut travailler dans des conditions thermiques différentes de celles qui sont associées à ses fonctions normales, l’employeur fournit des vêtements convenables ou tout autre équipement de protection individuelle nécessaire pour protéger la santé et la sécurité du travailleur, et oblige celui-ci à les utiliser.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers, des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) d’une part, le comité ou un représentant;

b) d’autre part, les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé en vertu du présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

Partie 6 EXIGENCES GÉNÉRALES EN MATIÈRE DE SANTÉ

Article 74 Conditions thermiques

74. (1) Sous réserve du paragraphe (3), dans un lieu de travail intérieur, l’employeur fournit et maintient des conditions thermiques, y compris la température de l’air, la température de rayonnement, l’humidité et le mouvement de l’air, qui :

a) sont adaptées à la nature du travail effectué;

b) protègent efficacement la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) offrent un confort thermique raisonnable aux travailleurs.

(2) Si l’environnement thermique dans un lieu de travail intérieur est susceptible de présenter un risque pour la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs, l’employeur fournit et maintient un instrument approprié et convenablement placé permettant de mesurer les conditions thermiques.

(3) S’il n’est pas raisonnablement possible de contrôler les conditions thermiques, ou si le travail est effectué à l’extérieur, l’employeur met en place et maintient des mesures visant :

a) d’une part, la protection efficace de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) d’autre part, le confort thermique raisonnable des travailleurs.

(4) Si un travailleur est obligé ou autorisé à travailler dans des conditions thermiques différentes de celles qui sont associées à ses fonctions normales, l’employeur fournit des vêtements convenables ou tout autre équipement de protection individuelle qui sont nécessaires pour protéger la santé et la sécurité du travailleur, et oblige celui-ci à les utiliser.