Home

Hand and Arm Protection PPE

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

Workers wear Hand and Arm Personal Protective Equipment (Hand and Arm PPE) to prevent exposure to one or more of the following types of hazards:

  • chemical (e.g. burns from acids, poisoning due to absorption of harmful substances);
  • biological (e.g. infection from viruses, bacteria);
  • environmental (e.g. extreme temperatures - frost bite due to exposure to cold weather, thermal burns from exposure to flames);
  • radiological (e.g. burns and other skin damage from exposure to ultraviolet, visible, or infrared radiation);
  • electrical dangers (e.g. burns and heart failure due to exposure to high current or voltages); and
  • other physical and mechanical hazards (e.g. flying objects, particles, sparks, and blades, which can cause lacerations, burns, abrasions, punctures, or loss of limbs).

Employers must first attempt to control these hazards by using the hierarchy of controls prior to having workers wear hand and arm PPE. The hierarchy of controls requires employers to first consider control measures such as substituting hazardous or harmful substances with less hazardous ones, or if possible  to engineer out hazards by installing shields or machine guards instead of relying on PPE alone to protect workers. Remember, PPE is the last line of safety!

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations require workers to use, properly care for, and inspect the PPE. They also require employers to provide PPE at no cost to the individual worker, and provide training to the worker on how to use and inspect the PPE properly. See “PPE Basics” for further information.

The Hand and Arm PPE Code of Practice provides instructions and information about regulatory requirements and safe practices. It is important to note that there is no CSA standard for the selection of hand and arm PPE. However, there may be CSA standards for specific tasks such as wood working (e.g. CSA Z114-M1977 Safety Code for the Woodworking Industry) and welding (e.g. CSA W117.2-12 Safety in welding, cutting, and allied processes). If there are no specific CSA standards for a task, then the employer must follow industry best practices such as the ones below:

In addition, the employer must determine the appropriate PPE based on a hazard assessment. The Hand and Arm PPE Code of Practice and industry best practices cannot anticipate every scenario that may require hand and arm protection. The hazard assessment should account for situations where there may be multiple hazards for a given task that could cause injuries such as abrasions, fractures, loss of limb, crushing, cuts, poisoning, burns, etc. It is also important that hand and arm PPE be flexible enough and properly fitted as to not limit hand and arm movement in the event of an emergency.

Employers must:

  • provide workers with appropriate and properly fitted hand and arm PPE to prevent injury from chemical or biological substances;
  • ensure workers wear appropriate and properly fitted hand or arm protection to prevent injury from chemical or biological substances;
  • provide workers with appropriate and properly fitted hand and arm PPE to prevent injury from exposure to extreme temperatures;
  • ensure workers wear appropriate and properly fitted hand and arm PPE to prevent injury from exposure to extreme temperatures;
  • provide and ensure workers use appropriate and properly fitted hand and arm PPE to protect them from injuries that may occur due to prolonged exposure to water;
  • supply and ensure workers use appropriate and properly fitted hand or arm protection to prevent puncture, abrasions, and irritations;
  • provide workers with approved and properly fitted rubber insulating gloves and sleeves to prevent exposure to energized conductors;
  • ensure workers wear approved and properly fitted rubber insulating gloves and sleeves when workers could be exposed to energized conductors;
  • follow industry best practices to select appropriate hand and arm protection by following standards issued by reputable organizations such as ACGIH and ANSI organizations (see above); and
  • prepare a hand and arm protection safety program to reduce the potential for skin and hand injury and to ensure compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, codes of practice, and standards.

Workers must:

  • test or visually inspect the equipment before each use according to employer’s instructions;
  • return defective PPE to the employer;
  • notify the employer of any defects found in the PPE; and
  • use and take reasonable steps to prevent damage to PPE.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 21 Occupational health and safety Program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Section 101 Hand and arm protection

101. (1) An employer shall provide, and require a worker to use, suitable and properly fitted hand or arm protection to protect the worker from injury to the hand or arm, including

(a) injury arising from exposure to chemical or biological substances;

(b) injury arising from exposure to work processes that result in extreme temperatures;

(c) injury arising from prolonged exposure to water; and

(d) puncture, abrasion or irritation of the skin.

(2) If a worker could contact an exposed energized high voltage conductor, an employer shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved rubber insulating gloves and mitts and approved rubber insulating sleeves.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 21 Occupational health and safety program

21. (1) An employer shall provide an occupational health and safety program under this section if

(a) there are 20 or more workers who work at the work site; or

(b) the employer is so directed by the Chief Safety Officer.

(2) An occupational health and safety program for a work site must include

(a) a statement of the employer’s policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of workers;

(b) an identification of hazards that could endanger workers at the work site, through a hazard recognition program;

(c) measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards identified under paragraph (b);

(d) an identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that could be required to respond to an emergency;

(e) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(f) a schedule for the regular inspection of the work site and inspection of work processes and procedures;

(g) a plan for the control of hazardous substances handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the work site and, if appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(h) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop;

(i) a procedure for the investigation of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act;

(j) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of refusals to work under section 13 of the Act; and

(k) a procedure to review and, if necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program not less than once every three years or whenever there is a change of circumstances that could affect the health or safety of workers.

(3) An occupational health and safety program must be implemented and updated in consultation with

(a) the Committee or representative; and

(b) the workers.

(4) An occupational health and safety program required under this section must be in writing and made available to the workers.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Section 101 Hand and arm protection

101. (1) An employer shall provide, and require a worker to use, suitable and properly fitted hand or arm protection to protect the worker from injury to the hand or arm, including

(a) injury arising from exposure to chemical or biological substances;

(b) injury arising from exposure to work processes that result in extreme temperatures;

(c) injury arising from prolonged exposure to water; and

(d) puncture, abrasion or irritation of the skin.

(2) If a worker could contact an exposed energized high voltage conductor, an employer shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved rubber insulating gloves and mitts and approved rubber insulating sleeves.

Accueil

Protection des mains et des bras

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

Les travailleurs portent un équipement de protection individuelle des mains et des bras (EPI des mains et des bras) afin de prévenir l’exposition à l’un ou plusieurs des types de dangers suivants :

  • chimique (p. ex. les brûlures à l’acide, l’empoisonnement dû à l’absorption de substances nocives);
  • biologique (p. ex. infection par des virus, des bactéries);
  • environnemental (p. ex. températures extrêmes : engelure due à l’exposition à des températures froides, brûlures thermiques dues à l’exposition aux flammes);
  • radiologique (p. ex. brûlures et autres dommages cutanés liés à l’exposition aux rayonnements ultraviolets, visibles ou infrarouges);
  • dangers électriques (p. ex. brûlures et défaillance cardiaque dues à l’exposition à des courants ou à des tensions élevés);
  • autres dangers physiques et mécaniques (p. ex. objets volants, particules, étincelles et lames, qui peuvent causer des lacérations, des brûlures, des abrasions, des piqûres ou la perte de membres).

Les employeurs doivent d’abord tenter de maîtriser ces dangers en recourant à la hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle avant d’exiger le port d’EPI des mains et des bras par les travailleurs. La hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle oblige les employeurs à considérer d’abord des mesures de contrôle telles que le remplacement des substances dangereuses ou nocives par des moins dangereuses, ou, si possible, à gérer les dangers en installant des boucliers ou des protections de machines au lieu de compter uniquement sur l’EPI pour protéger les travailleurs. Rappelez‑vous, l’EPI est une mesure de dernier recours en matière de sécurité!

Le Règlement canadien sur la santé et la sécurité au travail oblige les travailleurs à utiliser, à bien entretenir et à inspecter l’EPI. Il oblige également les employeurs à fournir l’EPI sans frais à chaque travailleur et à le former sur le mode d’emploi et d’inspection de l’EPI. Se reporter à « Rudiments de l’EPI » pour de plus amples renseignements.

Le code de pratique Équipement de protection individuelle: protection des mains et des bras donne des instructions et des renseignements sur les exigences réglementaires et les pratiques sécuritaires. Il convient de souligner qu’il n’existe aucune norme de la CSA pour la sélection de l’EPI des mains et des bras. Toutefois, il peut y avoir des normes de la CSA pour certaines tâches telles que le travail du bois (p. ex. CSA Z114-M1977 « Safety Code for the Woodworking Industry ») et le soudage (p. ex. CSA W117.2-12 Règles de sécurité en soudage, coupage et procédés connexes). En l’absence de normes de la CSA précises pour une tâche, l’employeur doit suivre les pratiques exemplaires de l’industrie, comme celles ci-dessous :

 

En outre, l’employeur doit déterminer l’EPI approprié en fonction d’une évaluation des dangers. Le code de pratique Équipement de protection individuelle : protection des mains et des bras et les pratiques exemplaires de l’industrie ne peuvent pas prévoir tous les scénarios qui pourraient nécessiter une protection des mains et des bras. L’évaluation des dangers devrait tenir compte des situations où une tâche donnée pourrait comporter de multiples dangers susceptibles de causer des blessures telles que des abrasions, des fractures, la perte de membres, l’écrasement, des coupures, l’empoisonnement, des brûlures, etc. Il est également important que l’équipement de protection individuelle : protection des mains et des bras soit assez flexible et bien ajusté afin de ne pas gêner le mouvement des bras et des jambes en cas d’urgence.

Les employeurs doivent :

  • fournir aux travailleurs un EPI des mains et des bras approprié et bien ajusté afin de prévenir les blessures causées par des substances chimiques ou biologiques;
  • veiller à ce que les travailleurs portent un EPI des mains et des bras approprié et bien ajusté afin de prévenir les blessures causées par des substances chimiques ou biologiques;
  • fournir aux travailleurs un EPI des mains et des bras approprié et bien ajusté afin de prévenir les blessures causées par l’exposition à des températures extrêmes;
  • veiller à ce que les travailleurs portent un EPI des mains et des bras approprié et bien ajusté afin de prévenir les blessures causées par l’exposition à des températures extrêmes;
  • fournir aux travailleurs un EPI des mains et des bras approprié et bien ajusté afin de les protéger contre les blessures qui pourraient survenir en raison de l’exposition prolongée à l’eau, et veiller à ce qu’ils l’utilisent;
  • fournir aux travailleurs un EPI des mains et des bras approprié et bien ajusté afin de prévenir les piqûres, les abrasions et les irritations, et veiller à ce qu’ils l’utilisent;
  • fournir aux travailleurs des gants et des manches isolés en caoutchouc afin de prévenir l’exposition aux conducteurs sous tension;
  • voir à ce que les travailleurs portent des gants et des manches isolés en caoutchouc approuvés et bien ajustés lorsque les travailleurs pourraient être exposés à des conducteurs sous tension;
  • suivre les pratiques exemplaires de l’industrie afin de sélectionner une protection des mains et des bras appropriée en respectant les normes émises par des organisations réputées telles que l’ACGIH et l’ANSI (voir ci-dessus);
  • préparer un programme de sécurité de la protection des mains et des bras afin de réduire le risque de blessure de la peau et des mains et d’assurer la conformité au Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail, aux codes de pratique et aux normes.

Les travailleurs doivent :

  • mettre à l’essai ou inspecter visuellement l’équipement avant chaque utilisation selon les instructions de l’employeur;
  • retourner l’EPI défectueux à l’employeur;
  • aviser l’employeur de tout défaut constaté dans l’EPI;
  • utiliser l’EPI et prendre des mesures raisonnables pour prévenir les dommages à celui-ci.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) le Comité ou un représentant;

b) les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé au présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

Part 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Section 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ni d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur de la défectuosité ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).

Section 101 Protection des mains et des bras

101. (1) L’employeur fournit et oblige les travailleurs à utiliser une protection pour les mains ou les bras convenable et bien ajustée qui les protège contre toute blessure aux mains ou aux bras, y compris :

a) une blessure résultant d’une exposition à des substances chimiques ou biologiques;

b) une blessure résultant d’une exposition à des méthodes de travail qui produisent des températures extrêmes;

c) une blessure résultant d’une exposition prolongée à l’eau;

d) une perforation, éraflure ou irritation de la peau.

(2) Si un travailleur risque d’entrer en contact avec un conducteur à haute tension exposé sous tension, l’employeur fournit et oblige le travailleur à utiliser des gants et mitaines isolants de caoutchouc approuvés et des gaines isolantes de caoutchouc approuvées.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 21 Programme de santé et de sécurité au travail

21. (1) L’employeur offre un programme de santé et de sécurité au travail conformément au présent article dans les cas suivants :

a) le lieu de travail compte 20 travailleurs ou plus;

b) l’agent de sécurité en chef le lui enjoint.

(2) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit comprendre, pour le lieu de travail, les éléments suivants :

a) l’énoncé de la politique de l’employeur concernant la protection et le maintien de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) l’identification, dans le cadre d’un programme d’identification des dangers, des dangers susceptibles de compromettre la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail;

c) les mesures, notamment la procédure à suivre en cas d’urgence, qui seront prises pour réduire, éliminer ou maîtriser les risques relevés conformément à l’alinéa b);

d) l’identification des ressources internes et externes, y compris le personnel et l’équipement, qui pourraient être nécessaires à une intervention en cas d’urgence;

e) un énoncé des responsabilités de l’employeur, des superviseurs et des travailleurs;

f) un horaire des inspections régulières du lieu de travail et de l’examen des méthodes et procédures de travail;

g) un plan de contrôle des substances dangereuses manipulées, utilisées, entreposées, produites ou éliminées au lieu de travail et, le cas échéant, de surveillance de l’environnement de travail;

h) un plan de formation des travailleurs et des superviseurs sur les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires, y compris les procédures, plans, politiques ou programmes que l’employeur est tenu d’élaborer;

i) une procédure d’enquête lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

j) une stratégie permettant la participation des travailleurs aux activités touchant la santé et la sécurité au travail, notamment en ce qui a trait aux inspections de vérification et aux enquêtes tenues lorsqu’un travailleur refuse de travailler en vertu de l’article 13 de la Loi;

k) une procédure d’examen et, au besoin, de révision des programmes en matière de santé et de sécurité au travail, au moins une fois tous les trois ans ou chaque fois que survient un changement de circonstances susceptible d’avoir une incidence sur la santé ou la sécurité des travailleurs.

(3) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail doit être mis en oeuvre et mis à jour en consultation avec :

a) d’une part, le comité ou un représentant;

b) d’autre part, les travailleurs.

(4) Le programme de santé et de sécurité au travail exigé en vertu du présent article doit être établi par écrit et mis à la disposition des travailleurs.

Partie 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Article 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) d’une part, sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) d’autre part, a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur du défaut ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).

Article 101 Protection des mains et des bras

101. (1) L’employeur fournit et oblige les travailleurs à utiliser une protection pour les mains ou les bras convenable et bien ajustée qui les protège contre toute blessure aux mains ou aux bras, y compris :

a) une blessure résultant d’une exposition à des substances chimiques ou biologiques;

b) une blessure résultant d’une exposition à des méthodes de travail qui produisent des températures extrêmes;

c) une blessure résultant d’une exposition prolongée à l’eau;

d) une perforation, éraflure ou irritation de la peau.

(2) Si un travailleur risque d’entrer en contact avec un conducteur à haute tension exposé sous tension, l’employeur fournit et oblige le travailleur à utiliser des gants et mitaines isolants de caoutchouc approuvés et des manchettes isolantes de caoutchouc approuvées.