Home

High Visibility Protection PPE

Highlighted words reveal
definitions when selected.

High-Visibility Personal Protective Equipment (High-Visibility PPE) is worn by workers when the worker may be exposed to one or more of the following types of hazards:

  • moving roadway traffic;
  • construction equipment;
  • large machinery;
  • nighttime work; or
  • environments where there is a lack of worker visibility.

Employers must first attempt to control these hazards by applying the hierarchy of controls prior to having workers wear high-visibility PPE. The hierarchy of controls requires employers to first consider alternative control measures, such as engineering controls (physical barriers and barricades) or administrative controls (re-organizing work, scheduling tasks during hours of increased daylight) instead of relying on PPE alone to protect workers. The employer must also consider other methods of illumination and use prescribed equipment (overhead or handheld lights) to improve visibility. Remember, PPE is the least effective control measure and should only be used as a last resort! See “PPE Basics” for further information on the hierarchy of controls.

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations require workers to use, properly care for, and inspect the PPE they are provided. The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations also require employers to provide PPE at no cost to the individual worker and provide training to the worker on how to use and inspect the PPE properly.

The High-Visibility PPE Code of Practice provides guidance and information about the regulatory requirements and applicable CSA standards, such as CSA Z96-09 (R2014) High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Z96.1-08(R2013) Guide on Selection, Use, and Care of High-Visibility Safety Apparel. In addition, the employer must determine the appropriate PPE based on a hazard assessment as the Code and CSA standards cannot predict every scenario/work task that may require high-visibility PPE. The hazard assessment should account for situations where a task involves many hazards, such as reduced visibility, moving equipment, large machinery and construction on a roadway still in use, etc.

Employers must:

  • educate and train workers on the proper use and care of high-visibility PPE, including the following information:
    • the results of the hazard assessment;
    • why high-visibility protection is necessary;
    • when workers must wear high-visibility protection;
    • how to use the high-visibility PPE properly;
    • how to inspect high-visibility PPE for signs of wear;
    • how to clean, care for, and use the high-visibility PPE;
    • what is considered misuse of high-visibility PPE (e.g. modifications); and
    • when high-visibility PPE must be returned and/or replaced.
  • provide and ensure workers wear approved and properly fitted high-visibility PPE including: a vest, armlets, or other clothing;
  • provide and ensure workers wear head PPE that meets high-visibility standards (e.g. fluorescent colour) when the visibility is poor (e.g. night work);
  • ensure workers are aware of the limitations of high-visibility PPE; and
  • immediately repair or replace defective high-visibility PPE;

Workers must:

  • use the required high-visibility PPE according to the instructions and training they receive;
  • inspect, clean, and store the high-visibility PPE according to the employer’s instructions and take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the PPE; and
  • return and notify the employer of any defects found in the PPE.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-039-2015

Part 9 SAFEGUARDS, STORAGE, WARNING SIGNS AND SIGNALS

Section 138 Designated Signallers

138. (1) If the giving of signals by a designated signaller is required by these regulations, an employer shall

(a) designate a worker to be the designated signaller;

(b) ensure that the designated signaller is trained to carry out his or her duties to ensure the signaller’s safety and the safety of other workers; and

(c) keep a record of the training provided and give a copy of the record to the designated signaller.

(2) An employer shall

(a) provide each designated signaller with, and require the signaller to use, a high visibility vest, armlets or other high visibility clothing; and

(b) provide each designated signaller with a suitable light to signal with during hours of darkness as defined in section 161 and in conditions of poor visibility.

(3) An employer shall

(a) install suitably placed signs to warn traffic of the presence of a designated signaller before the signaller begins work; and

(b) if reasonably possible, install suitable overhead lights to illuminate effectively a designated signaller.

(4) A designated signaller shall ensure that it is safe to proceed with a movement before signalling for the movement to proceed.

(5) If the giving of signals by a designated signaller is required by these regulations, an employer shall ensure that

(a) only a worker who is the designated signaller gives signals to an operator of any equipment other than in an emergency; and

(b) only one designated signaller gives signals to an operator at a time.

(6) If hand signals cannot be transmitted properly between a designated signaller and an operator, an employer shall ensure that additional designated signallers are available to make effective transmissions of signals, or some other means of communication is provided.

(7) If two or more designated signallers are used, an employer shall ensure that the designated signallers are able to communicate effectively with each other.

Section 139 Risk from vehicular traffic

139. (1) If a worker is at risk from vehicular traffic on a highway or at any other work site, an employer shall ensure that the worker is provided with and required to use a high visibility vest, armlets or other high visibility clothing.

(2) If a worker is at risk from vehicular traffic on a highway or at any other work site, an employer shall develop and implement a written traffic control plan to protect the worker from traffic hazards, using one or more of the following methods of traffic control:

(a) warning signs;

(b) barriers;

(c) lane control devices;

(d) flashing lights;

(e) flares;

(f) conspicuously identified pilot vehicles;

(g) automatic or remote-controlled traffic control systems;

(h) designated signallers directing traffic.

(3) An employer shall ensure that

(a) workers are trained in the traffic control plan developed under subsection (2); and

(b) the traffic control plan developed under subsection (2) is made readily available to workers at the work site.

(4) An employer shall not use designated signallers to control traffic on a highway unless those methods referred to in paragraphs (2)(a) to (g) are inadequate or unsuitable.

5) If designated signallers are used to control traffic on a highway, an employer shall provide

(a) not less than one designated signaller if

(i) traffic approaches from one direction only, or

(ii) traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would be clearly visible to one another; and

(b) not less than two designated signallers if traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would not be clearly visible to one another.

(6) A traffic control plan developed under subsection (2) must set out, if applicable,

(a) the maximum allowable speed of any vehicle or class of vehicles, including powered mobile equipment, in use at the work site;

(b) the maximum operating grades;

(c) the location and type of control signs;

(d) the route to be taken by vehicles or powered mobile equipment;

(e) the priority to be established for classes of vehicle;

(f) the location and type of barriers or restricted areas; and

(g) the duties of workers and the employer.

(7) A worker who operates a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment at a work site and who does not have a clear view of the path to be travelled shall not proceed until another worker, who has a clear view of the path to be travelled by the vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment, signals to the worker that it is safe to proceed.

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General duties of employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Section 94 Head protection

94. (1) If there is a risk of injury to the head of a worker, an employer shall

(a) ensure that the worker is provided with approved industrial head protection; and

(b) require a worker to use it.

(2) If a worker may contact an exposed energized conductor, an employer shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved industrial head protection that is of adequate dielectric strength to protect the worker.

(3) If a worker is required by these regulations to use industrial head protection, an employer shall provide the worker with

(a) a suitable liner if it is necessary to protect the worker from cold conditions; and

(b) a retention system to secure the industrial head protection firmly to the worker’s head if the worker is likely to work in conditions that could cause the head protection to dislodge.

(4) If visibility of a worker is necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker, an employer shall ensure that any industrial head protection provided to a worker under these regulations is fluorescent orange or some other high visibility colour.

(5) An employer shall not require or permit a worker to use any industrial head protection that

(a) is damaged or structurally modified;

(b) has been subjected to severe impact; or

(c) has been painted or cleaned with solvents.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations
R-003-2016

Part 9 SAFEGUARDS, STORAGE, WARNING SIGNS AND SIGNALS

Section 138 Designated Signallers

138. (1) If the giving of signals by a designated signaller is required by these regulations, an employer shall

(a) designate a worker to be the designated signaller;

(b) ensure that the designated signaller is trained to carry out his or her duties to ensure the signaller’s safety and the safety of other workers; and

(c) keep a record of the training provided and give a copy of the record to the designated signaller.

(2) An employer shall

(a) provide each designated signaller with, and require the signaller to use, a high visibility vest, armlets or other high visibility clothing; and

(b) provide each designated signaller with a suitable light to signal with during hours of darkness as defined in section 161 and in conditions of poor visibility.

(3) An employer shall

(a) install suitably placed signs to warn traffic of the presence of a designated signaller before the signaller begins work; and

(b) if reasonably possible, install suitable overhead lights to illuminate effectively a designated signaller.

(4) A designated signaller shall ensure that it is safe to proceed with a movement before signalling for the movement to proceed.

(5) If the giving of signals by a designated signaller is required by these regulations, an employer shall ensure that

(a) only a worker who is the designated signaller gives signals to an operator of any equipment other than in an emergency; and

(b) only one designated signaller gives signals to an operator at a time.

(6) If hand signals cannot be transmitted properly between a designated signaller and an operator, an employer shall ensure that additional designated signallers are available to make effective transmissions of signals, or some other means of communication is provided.

(7) If two or more designated signallers are used, an employer shall ensure that the designated signallers are able to communicate effectively with each other.

Section 139 Risk from vehicular traffic

139. (1) If a worker is at risk from vehicular traffic on a highway or at any other work site, an employer shall ensure that the worker is provided with and required to use a high visibility vest, armlets or other high visibility clothing.

(2) If a worker is at risk from vehicular traffic on a highway or at any other work site, an employer shall develop and implement a written traffic control plan to protect the worker from traffic hazards, using one or more of the following methods of traffic control:

(a) warning signs;

(b) barriers;

(c) lane control devices;

(d) flashing lights;

(e) flares;

(f) conspicuously identified pilot vehicles;

(g) automatic or remote-controlled traffic control systems;

(h) designated signallers directing traffic.

(3) An employer shall ensure that

(a) workers are trained in the traffic control plan developed under subsection (2); and

(b) the traffic control plan developed under subsection (2) is made readily available to workers at the work site.

(4) An employer shall not use designated signallers to control traffic on a highway unless those methods referred to in paragraphs (2)(a) to (g) are inadequate or unsuitable.

(5) If designated signallers are used to control traffic on a highway, an employer shall provide

(a) not less than one designated signaller if

(i) traffic approaches from one direction only, or

(ii) traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would be clearly visible to one another; and

(b) not less than two designated signallers if traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would not be clearly visible to one another.

(6) A traffic control plan developed under subsection (2) must set out, if applicable,

(a) the maximum allowable speed of any vehicle or class of vehicles, including powered mobile equipment, in use at the work site;

(b) the maximum operating grades;

(c) the location and type of control signs;

(d) the route to be taken by vehicles or powered mobile equipment;

(e) the priority to be established for classes of vehicle;

(f) the location and type of barriers or restricted areas; and

(g) the duties of workers and the employer.

(7) A worker who operates a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment at a work site and who does not have a clear view of the path to be travelled shall not proceed until another worker, who has a clear view of the path to be travelled by the vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment, signals to the worker that it is safe to proceed.

Part 3 GENERAL DUTIES

Section 12 General Duties of Employers

12. An employer shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) provide and maintain systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably possible, the health and safety of workers;

(b) arrange for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) provide information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers; and

(d) provide and maintain a safe means of entrance to and exit from the work site.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall, in respect of a work site,

(a) use safeguards, safety equipment and personal protective equipment required by these regulations; and

(b) follow safe work practices and procedures required by or developed under these regulations.

Part 7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Section 90 General responsibilities

90. (1) An employer who is required by these regulations to provide personal protective equipment to a worker shall

(a) provide approved personal protective equipment for use by the worker at no cost to the worker;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the worker;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the work site before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to the worker;

(e) ensure that the worker is

(i) aware of the location of the personal protective equipment, and

(ii) trained in its use;

(f) inform the worker of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to the worker is

(i) suitable and adequate and a proper fit for the worker,

(ii) maintained and kept in a sanitary condition, and

(iii) removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) If an employer requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time to do so during normal working hours without loss of pay or benefits.

(3) If reasonably possible, an employer shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce any danger or discomfort to the worker that could arise from the worker’s use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer shall

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) If personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it is intended for, the worker shall

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer; and

(b) inform the employer of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer under paragraph (5)(a).

Section 94 Head protection

94. (1) If there is a risk of injury to the head of a worker, an employer shall

(a) ensure that the worker is provided with approved industrial head protection; and

(b) require a worker to use it.

(2) If a worker may contact an exposed energized conductor, an employer shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved industrial head protection that is of adequate dielectric strength to protect the worker.

(3) If a worker is required by these regulations to use industrial head protection, an employer shall provide the worker with

(a) a suitable liner if it is necessary to protect the worker from cold conditions; and

(b) a retention system to secure the industrial head protection firmly to the worker’s head if the worker is likely to work in conditions that could cause the head protection to dislodge.

(4) If visibility of a worker is necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker, an employer shall ensure that any industrial head protection provided to a worker under these regulations is fluorescent orange or some other high visibility colour.

(5) An employer shall not require or permit a worker to use any industrial head protection that

(a) is damaged or structurally modified;

(b) has been subjected to severe impact; or

(c) has been painted or cleaned with solvents.

Accueil

EPI à haute visibilité

Sélectionnez les mots en surbrillance
pour obtenir la définition

L’équipement de protection individuelle à haute visibilité (EPI à haute visibilité) est porté par les travailleurs lorsque ceux-ci sont susceptibles d’être exposés à l’un ou plusieurs des types de dangers suivants :

  • circulation routière en mouvement;
  • équipement de construction;
  • grosses machines;
  • travail de nuit;
  • environnements où la visibilité des travailleurs est insuffisante.

Les employeurs doivent d’abord tenter de maîtriser ces dangers en recourant à la hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle avant d’exiger le port d’EPI à haute visibilité par les travailleurs. La hiérarchie des contrôles oblige les employeurs à envisager d’abord d’autres mesures de contrôle, telles que les contrôles techniques (barrières physiques et barrages) ou les contrôles administratifs (réorganisation du travail, planification des tâches pendant les heures de lumière du jour accrue) au lieu de se fier uniquement à l’EPI pour protéger les travailleurs. L’employeur doit également envisager d’autres méthodes d’éclairage et d’utiliser l’équipement prescrit (éclairage aérien ou à main) pour améliorer la visibilité. Rappelez-vous que l’EPI est la mesure de contrôle la moins efficace et ne devrait être utilisé qu’en dernier recours! Se reporter à « Rudiments de l’EPI » pour des renseignements plus détaillés sur la hiérarchie des mesures de contrôle.

Le Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail oblige les travailleurs à utiliser, à bien entretenir et à inspecter l’EPI qui leur est fourni. Le Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail oblige également les employeurs à fournir l’EPI sans frais à chaque travailleur et à lui donner une formation sur le mode d’emploi et d’inspection de l’EPI.

Le Code de pratique de l’EPI à haute visibilité fournit des directives et des renseignements sur les exigences réglementaires et les normes CSA applicables, comme la norme CSA Z96-F09 (C2014) - Vêtements de sécurité à haute visibilité et la norme Z96.1-F08(C2013) - Lignes directrices relatives à la sélection, à l’utilisation et à l’entretien des vêtements de sécurité à haute visibilité. En outre, l’employeur doit déterminer l’EPI en fonction d’une évaluation des dangers puisque le Code et la norme de la CSA ne peuvent pas prévoir tous les scénarios et tâches de travail qui pourraient nécessiter de l’EPI à haute visibilité. L’évaluation des dangers doit tenir compte des situations où une tâche présente de nombreux dangers, tels que la visibilité réduite, l’équipement en mouvement, les grosses machines et la construction sur une chaussée encore en usage, etc.

Les employeurs doivent :

  • éduquer les travailleurs et leur donner une formation sur l’utilisation et les soins appropriés de l’EPI à haute visibilité, y compris fournir les renseignements suivants :
    • les résultats de l’évaluation des dangers;
    • pourquoi l’EPI à haute visibilité est nécessaire;
    • quand les travailleurs doivent porter une protection à haute visibilité;
    • comment utiliser correctement l’EPI à haute visibilité;
    • comment inspecter l’EPI pour s’assurer qu’il n’y a pas de signes d’usure;
    • comment nettoyer, faire l’entretien et utiliser l’EPI à haute visibilité;
    • ce qui est considéré comme une mauvaise utilisation de l’EPI à haute visibilité (p. ex. modifications);
    • quand l’EPI à haute visibilité doit être retourné ou remplacé.
  • fournir et veiller à ce que les travailleurs portent un EPI à haute visibilité approuvé et correctement ajusté, incluant : un gilet, des brassards ou d’autres vêtements;
  • fournir et veiller à ce que les travailleurs portent un EPI pour la tête qui répond aux normes à haute visibilité (p. ex. une couleur fluorescente) lorsque la visibilité est médiocre (p. ex. travail de nuit);
  • s’assurer que les travailleurs sont conscients des limites de l’EPI à haute visibilité;
  • réparer ou remplacer immédiatement les EPI à haute visibilité défectueux.

Les travailleurs doivent :

  • utiliser l’EPI à haute visibilité requis conformément aux instructions et à la formation reçues;
  • inspecter, nettoyer et entreposer l’EPI à haute visibilité conformément aux instructions de l’employeur et prendre des mesures raisonnables pour prévenir les dommages à l’EPI;
  • retourner l’EPI et aviser l’employeur de tout défaut constaté dans l’EPI.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-039-2015

Part 9 DISPOSITIFS DE PROTECTION, ENTREPOSAGE, PANNEAUX ET SIGNAUX D’AVERTISSEMENT

Section 138 Signaleurs désignés

138. (1) Si le présent règlement exige qu’un signaleur désigné donne des signaux, l’employeur :

a) désigne un travailleur à titre de signaleur désigné;

b) veille à ce que le signaleur désigné soit formé pour exercer ses fonctions, afin d’assurer la sécurité du signaleur et celle des autres travailleurs;

c) tient un document sur la formation fournie et donne une copie de ce document au signaleur désigné.

(2) L’employeur :

a) fournit à chaque signaleur désigné et l’oblige à utiliser un gilet de haute visibilité, des brassards ou d’autres vêtements de haute visibilité;

b) fournit à chaque signaleur désigné une lumière convenable avec laquelle il peut donner des signaux pendant les heures d’obscurité au sens de l’article 161 et par mauvaise visibilité.

(3) L’employeur :

a) installe des panneaux convenablement placés pour avertir les conducteurs de la présence d’un signaleur désigné avant que celui-ci ne commence à travailler;

b) s’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, installe des lumières en plongée convenables pour éclairer efficacement le signaleur désigné.

(4) Le signaleur désigné s’assure qu’une manœuvre peut être effectuée en toute sécurité avant de signaler qu’elle peut être effectuée.

(5) Si le présent règlement exige qu’un signaleur désigné donne des signaux, l’employeur s’assure :

a) que seul le travailleur qui est le signaleur désigné donne des signaux à un conducteur de matériel, sauf dans une situation d’urgence;

b) qu’un seul signaleur désigné à la fois donne des signaux à un conducteur.

(6) Si des signaux manuels ne peuvent être transmis convenablement entre un signaleur désigné et un conducteur, l’employeur s’assure que des signaleurs désignés supplémentaires sont disponibles pour transmettre efficacement des signaux ou qu’un autre moyen de communication est fourni.

(7) Lorsqu’au moins deux signaleurs désignés sont utilisés, l’employeur s’assure que les signaleurs désignés sont capables de communiquer efficacement les uns avec les autres.

Section 139 Risque associé à la circulation routière

139. (1) Si un travailleur est vulnérable à la circulation routière sur une route ou dans tout autre lieu de travail, l’employeur s’assure que le travailleur se voit fournir et est tenu d’utiliser un gilet de haute visibilité, des brassards ou d’autres vêtements de haute visibilité.

(2) Si un travailleur est vulnérable à la circulation routière sur une route ou dans tout autre lieu de travail, l’employeur élabore et met en œuvre un plan écrit de contrôle de la circulation pour protéger le travailleur des dangers de la circulation au moyen d’une ou de plusieurs des méthodes de contrôle de la circulation suivantes :

a) des panneaux d’avertissement;

b) des barrières;

c) des dispositifs de contrôle des voies;

d) des lumières clignotantes;

e) des fusées éclairantes;

f) des véhicules d’escorte clairement désignés;

g) des systèmes de contrôle de la circulation automatiques ou télécommandés;

h) des signaleurs désignés qui dirigent la circulation.

(3) L’employeur s’assure :

a) que les travailleurs ont reçu une formation concernant le plan de contrôle de la circulation élaboré conformément au paragraphe (2);

b) que le plan de contrôle de la circulation élaboré conformément au paragraphe (2) est mis à la disposition des travailleurs dans le lieu de travail.

(4) L’employeur ne doit pas utiliser de signaleurs désignés pour diriger la circulation sur une route, sauf si les méthodes mentionnées aux alinéas (2) a) à g) sont insatisfaisantes ou contre-indiquées.

(5) Lorsque des signaleurs désignés sont utilisés pour diriger la circulation sur une route, l’employeur fournit ce qui suit :

a) au moins un signaleur désigné si, selon le cas :

(i) la circulation est à sens unique,

(ii) la circulation va dans les deux sens et que le signaleur désigné et le conducteur d’un véhicule qui approche seraient clairement visibles l’un pour l’autre;

b) au moins deux signaleurs désignés si la circulation va dans les deux sens et que le signaleur désigné et le conducteur d’un véhicule qui approche ne seraient pas clairement visibles l’un pour l’autre.

(6) Le plan de contrôle de la circulation élaboré conformément au paragraphe (2) doit établir, s’il y a lieu :

a) la vitesse maximale admissible de tout véhicule ou de toute catégorie de véhicules, y compris le matériel mobile motorisé, qui est utilisé dans le lieu de travail;

b) les pentes maximales où la circulation est permise;

c) l’emplacement et le type des panneaux de contrôle;

d) l’itinéraire que doivent suivre les véhicules ou le matériel mobile motorisé;

e) la priorité qui doit être établie pour les catégories de véhicule;

f) l’emplacement et le type des barrières ou des zones réglementées;

g) les fonctions des travailleurs et de l’employeur.

(7) Le travailleur qui conduit un véhicule ou une unité de matériel mobile motorisé dans un lieu de travail et qui ne voit pas clairement le chemin à emprunter ne peut circuler tant qu’un autre travailleur qui voit clairement le chemin que doit emprunter le véhicule ou l’unité de matériel mobile motorisé n’a pas signalé au travailleur qu’il peut circuler en toute sécurité.

Part 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES DES EMPLOYEURS

Section 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure du possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Section 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, le matériel de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques de travail et procédures sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou mises en place conformément au présent règlement.

Part 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Section 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ni d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur de la défectuosité ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).

Section 94 Casque protecteur

94. (1) S’il y a un risque de blessure à la tête d’un travailleur, l’employeur :

a) s’assure que le travailleur se voit fournir un casque protecteur pour l’industrie approuvé;

b) oblige le travailleur à l’utiliser.

(2) Si un travailleur risque d’entrer en contact avec un conducteur sous tension exposé, l’employeur fournit et oblige le travailleur à utiliser un casque protecteur pour l’industrie approuvé dont la rigidité diélectrique est suffisante pour protéger le travailleur.

(3) Si le présent règlement exige que les travailleurs utilisent un casque protecteur pour l’industrie, l’employeur leur fournit :

a) une doublure convenable, si celle-ci est nécessaire pour protéger les travailleurs des conditions froides;

b) un système de retenue pour fixer le casque protecteur pour l’industrie fermement sur la tête des travailleurs, si ceux-ci sont susceptibles de travailler dans des conditions qui pourraient faire détacher le casque protecteur.

(4) Si la visibilité d’un travailleur est nécessaire à la protection de sa santé et de sa sécurité, l’employeur s’assure que tout casque protecteur pour l’industrie fourni au travailleur conformément au présent règlement est de couleur orange fluorescent ou d’une autre couleur très visible.

(5) L’employeur ne peut obliger ni autoriser un travailleur à utiliser un casque protecteur pour l’industrie qui :

a) est endommagé ou dont la structure a été modifiée;

b) a été soumis à un fort impact;

c) a été peint ou nettoyé avec des solvants.

Règlement sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
R-003-2016

Partie 9 DISPOSITIFS DE PROTECTION, ENTREPOSAGE, PANNEAUX ET SIGNAUX D'AVERTISSEMENT

Article 138 Signaleurs désignés

138. (1) Si le présent règlement exige qu’un signaleur désigné donne des signaux, l’employeur :

a) désigne un travailleur à titre de signaleur désigné;

b) veille à ce que le signaleur désigné soit formé pour exercer ses fonctions, afin d’assurer la sécurité du signaleur et celle des autres travailleurs;

c) tient un dossier de la formation fournie et donne une copie de celui-ci au signaleur désigné.

(2) L’employeur :

a) d’une part, fournit à chaque signaleur désigné et l’oblige à utiliser un gilet de haute visibilité, des brassards ou d’autres vêtements de haute visibilité;

b) d’autre part, fournit à chaque signaleur désigné une lumière convenable avec laquelle il peut donner des signaux pendant les heures d’obscurité au sens de l’article 161 et par mauvaise visibilité.

(3) L’employeur :

a) d’une part, installe des panneaux convenablement placés pour avertir les conducteurs de la présence d’un signaleur désigné avant que celui-ci ne commence à travailler;

b) d’autre part, s’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, installe des lumières en plongée convenables pour éclairer efficacement le signaleur désigné.

(4) Le signaleur désigné s’assure qu’une manoeuvre peut être effectuée en toute sécurité avant de signaler qu’elle peut être effectuée.

(5) Si le présent règlement exige qu’un signaleur désigné donne des signaux, l’employeur s’assure :

a) d’une part, que seul le travailleur qui est le signaleur désigné donne des signaux à un conducteur d’équipement, sauf dans une situation d’urgence;

b) d’autre part, qu’un seul signaleur désigné à la fois donne des signaux à un conducteur.

(6) Si des signaux manuels ne peuvent être transmis convenablement entre un signaleur désigné et un conducteur, l’employeur s’assure que des signaleurs désignés supplémentaires sont disponibles pour transmettre efficacement des signaux ou qu’un autre moyen de communication est fourni.

(7) Lorsqu’au moins deux signaleurs désignés sont utilisés, l’employeur s’assure que les signaleurs désignés sont capables de communiquer efficacement les uns avec les autres.

Article 139 Risque associé à la circulation routière

139. (1) Si un travailleur est vulnérable à la circulation routière sur une route ou dans tout autre lieu de travail, l’employeur s’assure que le travailleur se voit fournir et est tenu d’utiliser un gilet de haute visibilité, des brassards ou d’autres vêtements de haute visibilité.

(2) Si un travailleur est vulnérable à la circulation routière sur une route ou dans tout autre lieu de travail, l’employeur élabore et met en oeuvre un plan écrit de contrôle de la circulation pour protéger le travailleur des dangers de la circulation au moyen d’une ou de plusieurs des méthodes de contrôle de la circulation suivantes :

a) des panneaux d’avertissement;

b) des barrières;

c) des dispositifs de contrôle des voies;

d) des lumières clignotantes;

e) des fusées éclairantes;

f) des véhicules d’escorte clairement désignés;

g) des systèmes de contrôle de la circulation automatiques ou télécommandés;

h) des signaleurs désignés qui dirigent la circulation.

(3) L’employeur s’assure :

a) d’une part, que les travailleurs ont reçu une formation concernant le plan de contrôle de la circulation élaboré conformément au paragraphe (2);

b) d’autre part, que le plan de contrôle de la circulation élaboré conformément au paragraphe (2) est rendu facilement accessible pour les travailleurs dans le lieu de travail.

(4) L’employeur ne doit pas utiliser de signaleurs désignés pour diriger la circulation sur une route, sauf si les méthodes mentionnées aux alinéas (2)a) à g) sont inadéquates ou ne conviennent pas.

(5) Lorsque des signaleurs désignés sont utilisés pour diriger la circulation sur une route, l’employeur fournit ce qui suit :

a) au moins un signaleur désigné si, selon le cas :

(i) la circulation est à sens unique,

(ii) la circulation va dans les deux sens et que le signaleur désigné et le conducteur d’un véhicule qui approche seraient clairement visibles l’un pour l’autre;

b) au moins deux signaleurs désignés si la circulation va dans les deux sens et que le signaleur désigné et le conducteur d’un véhicule qui approche ne seraient pas clairement visibles l’un pour l’autre.

(6) Le plan de contrôle de la circulation élaboré conformément au paragraphe (2) doit établir, s’il y a lieu :

a) la vitesse maximale admissible de tout véhicule ou de toute catégorie de véhicules, y compris le matériel mobile motorisé, qui est utilisé dans le lieu de travail;

b) les pentes maximales où la circulation est permise;

c) l’emplacement et le type des panneaux de contrôle;

d) l’itinéraire que doivent suivre les véhicules ou le matériel mobile motorisé;

e) la priorité qui doit être établie pour les catégories de véhicule;

f) l’emplacement et le type des barrières ou des zones réglementées;

g) les fonctions des travailleurs et de l’employeur.

(7) Le travailleur qui conduit un véhicule ou une unité de matériel mobile motorisé dans un lieu de travail et qui ne voit pas clairement le chemin à emprunter ne peut circuler tant qu’un autre travailleur qui voit clairement le chemin que doit emprunter le véhicule ou l’unité de matériel mobile motorisé n’a pas signalé au travailleur qu’il peut circuler en toute sécurité.

Partie 3 OBLIGATIONS GÉNÉRALES

Article 12 Obligations générales des employeurs

12. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, l’employeur :

a) met en place et maintient des méthodes de travail et un environnement de travail qui assurent, dans la mesure de ce qui est raisonnablement possible, la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs;

b) prend des mesures pour que l’utilisation, la manipulation, l’entreposage et le transport des articles et des substances se fassent de manière à assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

c) fournit les renseignements, les directives, la formation et la supervision nécessaires pour assurer la protection de la santé et de la sécurité des travailleurs;

d) fournit et maintient un moyen d’accès au lieu de travail et de sortie du lieu qui est sécuritaire.

Article 13 Obligations générales des travailleurs

13. En ce qui a trait au lieu de travail, le travailleur :

a) utilise les dispositifs de protection, l’équipement de sécurité et l’équipement de protection individuelle exigés par le présent règlement;

b) applique les pratiques et procédures de travail sécuritaires exigées par le présent règlement ou élaborées conformément au présent règlement.

Partie 7 ÉQUIPEMENT DE PROTECTION INDIVIDUELLE

Article 90 Responsabilités générales

90. (1) L’employeur que le présent règlement oblige à fournir de l’équipement de protection individuelle à un travailleur :

a) fournit l’équipement de protection individuelle approuvé qui est destiné au travailleur, sans frais pour celui-ci;

b) s’assure que le travailleur utilise l’équipement de protection individuelle;

c) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle se trouve dans le lieu de travail avant que le travail ne commence;

d) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle est entreposé dans un lieu propre et sûr auquel le travailleur peut facilement avoir accès;

e) s’assure que le travailleur :

(i) d’une part, sait où se trouve l’équipement de protection individuelle,

(ii) d’autre part, a reçu une formation quant à son utilisation;

f) informe le travailleur des raisons pour lesquelles l’équipement de protection individuelle doit être utilisé et des limites de sa protection;

g) s’assure que l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur est :

(i) convenable, en bon état et bien adapté au travailleur,

(ii) entretenu et maintenu dans de bonnes conditions d’hygiène,

(iii) mis hors usage ou hors service lorsqu’il est endommagé.

(2) L’employeur qui exige qu’un travailleur nettoie et entretienne de l’équipement de protection individuelle s’assure que le travailleur a suffisamment de temps pour le faire pendant les heures normales de travail, sans perte de salaire ou d’avantages.

(3) S’il est raisonnablement possible de le faire, l’employeur apporte les ajustements appropriés aux procédures de travail et au rythme de travail afin d’éliminer ou de réduire tout danger ou inconfort pour le travailleur qui pourrait résulter de son utilisation de l’équipement de protection individuelle.

(4) Le travailleur auquel l’employeur fournit de l’équipement de protection individuelle :

a) utilise cet équipement;

b) prend des mesures raisonnables pour éviter que l’équipement de protection individuelle soit endommagé.

(5) Si l’équipement de protection individuelle fourni au travailleur devient défectueux ou n’offre pas la protection qu’il devrait offrir, le travailleur :

a) le retourne à l’employeur;

b) informe l’employeur du défaut ou de toute autre raison pour laquelle l’équipement de protection individuelle n’offre pas la protection qu’il devait offrir.

(6) L’employeur répare ou remplace immédiatement tout équipement de protection individuelle qui lui est retourné conformément à l’alinéa (5)a).

Article 94 Casque protecteur

94. (1) S’il y a un risque de blessure à la tête d’un travailleur, l’employeur :

a) d’une part, s’assure que le travailleur se voit fournir un casque protecteur pour l’industrie approuvé;

b) d’autre part, oblige le travailleur à l’utiliser.

(2) Si un travailleur risque d’entrer en contact avec un conducteur sous tension exposé, l’employeur fournit et oblige le travailleur à utiliser un casque protecteur pour l’industrie approuvé dont la rigidité diélectrique est suffisante pour protéger le travailleur.

(3) Si le présent règlement exige que les travailleurs utilisent un casque protecteur pour l’industrie, l’employeur leur fournit :

a) d’une part, une doublure convenable, si celle-ci est nécessaire pour protéger les travailleurs des conditions froides;

b) d’autre part, un système de retenue pour fixer le casque protecteur pour l’industrie fermement sur la tête des travailleurs, si ceux-ci sont susceptibles de travailler dans des conditions qui pourraient faire détacher le casque protecteur.

(4) Si la visibilité d’un travailleur est nécessaire à la protection de sa santé et de sa sécurité, l’employeur s’assure que tout casque protecteur pour l’industrie fourni au travailleur conformément au présent règlement est de couleur orange fluorescent ou d’une autre couleur très visible.

(5) L’employeur ne peut obliger ni autoriser un travailleur à utiliser un casque protecteur pour l’industrie qui, selon le cas :

a) est endommagé ou dont la structure a été modifiée;

b) a été soumis à un fort impact;

c) a été peint ou nettoyé avec des solvants.